To OSB or Not to OSB

That is the question.
I'm going to take out the carpet from our living room and install tile. The subfloor is 3/4 OSB. Can I just put tile backer board on top of this or no t? If so, should I go 1/2 inch instead of 1/4? I see a lot of conflicting i nformation about this. Most say it's ok, but we talked with the Home Depot guy and he insisted it needs to be plywood. What thoughts?
Thanks!
Mike
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On Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 4:01:13 PM UTC-4, Michael Wilson wrote:

he subfloor is 3/4 OSB. Can I just put tile backer board on top of this or not? If so, should I go 1/2 inch instead of 1/4? I see a lot of conflicting information about this. Most say it's ok, but we talked with the Home Depo t guy and he insisted it needs to be plywood. What thoughts?

if your installing ceramic tile use concrete board and mortar the joints. b e sure the cement board joints arent the same as the underlying osb joints
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On Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 4:43:37 PM UTC-5, bob haller wrote:

The subfloor is 3/4 OSB. Can I just put tile backer board on top of this o r not? If so, should I go 1/2 inch instead of 1/4? I see a lot of conflicti ng information about this. Most say it's ok, but we talked with the Home De pot guy and he insisted it needs to be plywood. What thoughts?

be sure the cement board joints arent the same as the underlying osb joint s
We saw some porcelain tile we liked, but it's ok to use concrete board over OSB? I'm not sure why the Home Depot guy was so insistent that that was a bad idea.
Thanks,
Mike
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On Sat, 2 Jul 2016 14:57:45 -0700 (PDT), Michael Wilson

Because it's a bad idea. Not saying your installation WILL fail, but the chances of success using OSB will be significantly lower rhan with plywood - and just putting plywood over the OSB is not quite as effective as replacing the OSB and doesn't raise the floor level as much.
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On 7/2/2016 10:04 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd talk to a real tile guy, not the Home Depot guy.
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I did when I tiled my foyer.
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On Saturday, July 2, 2016 at 10:43:33 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

over OSB? I'm not sure why the Home Depot guy was so insistent that that w as a bad idea.

Or just google. Did that and there is plenty of information there from credible sources to figure it out, including this from HD:
"Tip: Make sure the subfloor will not deteriorate when it gets wet. Particl eboard is not an acceptable subfloor material for tiling projects. Oriented strand board, or OSB, and exterior-grade plywood will work if first covere d with a latex-modified mortar and a tiling backerboard. "
And did he ask the HD tile guy what the specific problem with OSB is?
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On Sunday, July 3, 2016 at 12:19:52 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

rd over OSB? I'm not sure why the Home Depot guy was so insistent that that was a bad idea.

h

cleboard is not an acceptable subfloor material for tiling projects. Orient ed strand board, or OSB, and exterior-grade plywood will work if first cove red with a latex-modified mortar and a tiling backerboard. "

not all particle board is damaged by water. I once got a machine shipped to me in a particle board crate......
it was late fall and i didnt get around to getting rid of the crate..... i used it to store some yard stuff, it had no protection from the rain and sn ow...... i put it behind the house and it was out there for 6 years perhaps more.
after wife wanted yard cleaned up i thought i could smash it but had to use a circular saw to cut it up in small enough pieces for the trash
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On 7/2/2016 4:01 PM, Michael Wilson wrote:

The tile manufacturer usually specifies the maximum allowable deflection. Sometimes larger tiles require a stiffer floor.
For example, my floor trusses were 24" OC and 28' long (28'x28' room) so I had to have 1.875" of combined plywood thickness. My wife and I were screwing on the floor for days...and then we had to lay the tile.
http://tiledoctor.com/how-to-tile/deflection/
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