tires in storage

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wrote:

And as much or more than even the tire, all the other peripheral conditions that are too numerous and variable to control to be able to generalize.
My general feeling is that for local, low- to mid-speed driving, as long as the tire has been maintained at proper inflation, etc., and shows no visible signs of _extreme_ UV damage, etc., they're "safe enough". I would be somewhat nervous about taking that same tire and start cross-country on an interstate trip, especially in hot weather. Might be fine, but I'd far prefer to be safe than sorry. Before I started in a case like that, I'd put a new set on. Otherwise, I'd run them until something happened...
Obviously, ymmv... :)
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Covered you could keep them completely out of sunlight. Don't really have any feel other than "quite a long time" -- guess how comfortable I'd be driving on them would depend on what kind of tire and on what kind of vehicle and driving they were used eventually.
I hadn't heard the Bonneville story -- I'd worry in that use! :)
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Like Joseph, I also have a "meant to" to add... :)
I think temperature control, especially excessive heat, is important, too....if the garage isn't climate-controlled and gets quite hot during the summer months, I'd expect that to shorten expected lifetime significantly as well.
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wrote:

Doesn't sound like storing tires in the garage is a smart idea. In fact it doesn't sound like storing tires is a good idea at all - unless you have 2 sets you routinely change at the seasons.
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I don't know what the maximum is, but I've used tires that were over five years old, driven on tires that were well over 10 years old. and have seen cars with tires that were 15+ years old. You may get more detailed information on an automotive newsgroup, especially if one is devoted to classics or antiques.
http://www.goodyear.com/rv/tirecare/tire_storage.html
also on another page TIRE AGE A number of RV owners have established their own removal policy, averaging seven years
From Bridgestone
If it is any help, Bridgestone's warranty expires (6) years after the date of manufacture
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Oh, yes...
I have numerous tires on farm equipment that are easily 15-20 years old and quite servicable, for the use. Don't think I'd put one back on the pickup and take off across country with one, however! :)
The old (1958) grain truck which is only used for very local light hauling any more has tires that are easily 20 years old on it, best as I could guess based on the manufacturer info (they bear an old Co-op logo from at least two reorginizations prior to final dissolution of the Farmland and I can vaguely recall when those logo shifts occurred as I can remember some of those changes and what was going on at the time. I have no qualms driving it at country road speeds and w/ moderate loads but again I'd not put 600 bu of grain on it and start off on a long distance haul, either!
I'm thinking it depends a whole lot on the circumstances but in general I'd think 10 years would be pretty safe in reasonable storage conditions...
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Makes one wonder about these independent tire stores & Co-ops. How long have some of the more uncommon sizes been sitting in storage waiting for a buyer?
-Red
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wrote:

at maufacturer/wholesale/retail levels, I wouldn't lose sleep over it. Even for somewhat common sizes, in recent years I have been told a couple of times that I will have to come back Thursday, when the truck comes in. Like any other retail chain for consumers, they only stock what history shows they can sell quickly.
Of course, if you are talking real oddball stuff, like licensed 3rd-party repro Polyglas GT redline Bias Plies for your '69 'cuda show car, where they only dig out the molds and run a batch every five years, yeah, there might be cause for concern. 'NOS' is not a good thing for shelf-life parts.
aem sends...
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five years from date of mfg. Like if they were being used. Five years, then done.
--
Steve Barker





"Eigenvector" <m44 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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On Sat, 2 Jun 2007 16:38:38 -0700, "Eigenvector"

The best tire is a newly-made one, best safety factor too. Tires laying around attract varmints.
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