Tire pressure

Page 4 of 5  
On Fri, 9 Jan 2015 10:51:08 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You can do better than the 25% but it takes work. Pump the tires up to a value that is higher than your desired pressure and then press the recalibrate button. Then reduce the pressure to your desired pressure. In your case, you said that a setting of 41 causes the warning at 32 - roughly 25% low. Just recalibrate the system at 38 or 39 in order to get a warning at <30.
You make a good point that these systems are not required. I have always had a good gauge and used it regularly but as I get older I like that if I get lazy and don't check for a while, it still warns me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat:
On the Kias at least the tpms needs to be dealer reset. And since I've had a dashlight since 2012, I suspect one of the units might be damaged or mala djusted. If I inflate my tires to at least 35psi, the light goes out. So it may not be a battery in one of the modules.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vic Smith wrote:

Motorcycle Consumer News, an ad free magazine, did a test of tire gauges a couple of years ago. There were several fancy ones but the $3 Slime pencil type did as well as any.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I actually adjust my pressure down to 1/10th PSI. Yeah, it matters that much. ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/9/2015 9:19 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I adjust to 1/100 PSI and stop every ten miles to adjust. In really cold weather I can go 15 miles before they get too high.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote: "I adjust to 1/100 PSI and stop every ten miles to adjust. In really cold weather I can go 15 miles before they get too high. "
Sarcasm unnecessary. If I notice a difference, then it has worked for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Placebos work just fine...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/2015 2:43 PM, rbowman wrote:

Yes, but the prescription ones work better than the OTC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
rbowman, Ed Pawlowski:
I check my tires on a time basis and in a manner that satisfies ME. Some drivers never check them.
I'm proud not to be in the latter category. Think about how you would feel if someone else made the same comments about you that you did about me. Treat others the way you would like to be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/2015 5:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wow, you were serious about 1/10 of a pound???? I know some serious car guys but never heard of anyone be that anal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote: "- show quoted text - Wow, you were serious about 1/10 of a pound???? I know some serious car guys but never heard of anyone be that anal. "
How about the way you arrange all the socks in your drawer by color?
Seriously, before you call someone anal, think about how you'd feel if someone called YOU anal.
Like I said, for every one of me, there are 100 who don't even TOUCH their tires. Think about that next time you're on the highway - how many adjacent vehicles are riding 10psi above or below their recommended pressures.
Back to topic, people: TIRE PRESSURES - not how "anal" someone is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/2015 7:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have a few pairs of black socks in the back of the drawer. I have a bunch of white socks in the front of the drawer. All the same brand,same everything. Makes life simple.

I've been called worse. Most of us are probably anal about something. Go ahead, call me what you want. If you've not already called me an a-hole I'd be disappointed.

You said 1/10th. If you would say 10# that is opposite overboard, but I agree, many are =/- that much. If you said you keep your tires within 1#, I'd believe you and say, very good.

OK, your not anal (maybe), but at 1/10th PSI you are not believable. Was that a typo? You have to pull your car into a science lab, not use garage tools. You can get a $90 digital gauge that reads to 0.10 but typical tire gauges a +/- 2 psi. By the time you get the 4th tire as close as you say, the first will have changed 1/10th.
I'd put money on it. At any given time if I went to your car and checked the tires, they would be out more than that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote: "I've been called worse. Most of us are probably anal about something. Go ahead, call me what you want. If you've not already called me an a-hole"
I'll call you by your given name. I've been called too many names and adjectives in my life to not know how it feels. Ergo the little scriptural above about doing to others as you would like done to yourself.
And yes, I am very precise about tire pressures. On my large dial gauge I can adust to exactly the 30, 32, or 34psi tick mark and be satisfied with the result. Call that anal - I call it common sense.
People also tend to criticize what they don't understand or are ignorant of. And that leads to name-calling or adjectives (such as 'weird' or 'anal'). It's hunan nature. I can forgiveyou if that's genuinely the case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/2015 8:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I agree that is common sense. Going back to the original statemnt I saw, it read 1/10 of a pound. That is far different that using the tick marks of a normal tire gauge.

Not a matter of understanding. When I read 1/10 of a pound, I honestly thought it was a joke. Really. Your present statement is very believable. The best driver in the world could not tell if three tires were inflated to 32# and one was 32.1#.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/2015 7:56 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My goodness, how....
Oh, nevermind.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I don't know about anal but I see some serious technical problems with measuring pressure that accurately including ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, the A/D conversion, and so forth. But if it makes the OP feel good...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The vast majority of pressure guages don't have repeatability within 2/10, much less accuracy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2015 16:56:39 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

OK - on RECOMMENDED pressures - I generally run at least 5 psi higher than the sticker pressure on the car. Stock tire size. Tires wear better, and handle a LOT better - no "tucking in" on hard corners.Rides a wee bit harsher, but that can be an advantage when a car rides like it's on a cloud.
And what pressure to you run an a lightly loaded pickup that came from the factory on little 14 inch tires when you put larger 15 inch snow tires on it? Or even bigger 16 inch LT tires on the summer mags??? The "recommended" pressure goes right out the window. (HInt - you do NOT use the pressure stamped on the sidewalls or you might as well be running on steel trolley wheels!!!)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/11/2015 9:52 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Agree on that. Added benefit is the TPMS light does not go on if the weather turns cold. I happened to be at the dealer's service area on a day we had the first cold snap. Sure enough, a couple of people cam in to have tires checked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll take it one step farther. On a common vehicle with a street suspension setup I defy ANYONE to tell if one tire is off by 1 full PSI from 32 - either up or down by driving it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.