Tips for pigtailing / wirenutting outlets with 12AWG wire

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Howdy all.
Since I will be pigtailing in about 20 outlets and I know 12AWG can be kind of stiff to work with, I thought I would ask if anyone here has any tips to make the job easier ?
I have already pre-wired the pig-tails to the outlets since it's something that could easily be done from the comfort of my couch while watching the basketball game. The pigtails for the hots, neutrals and grounds are all about 6 inches long and I just made them from some existing 12AWG NM/B wire I had (si they're pretty straight right now).
I have the red wing-nut style wire-nuts and will have to joint (3) 12AWG wires into each nut.
Any tips to make the job easier or better would be appreciated!
Thanks, Kevin
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The best tip is to use large enough boxes, so you don't have to cram the wires into them. Some wire nuts require twisting the wires (clockwise) and some do not, just make them tight

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wrote:

Fiberglass ladders have aluminum components. I've used both that have lived on top of bucket trucks for years on end. I have a 28' glass ladder at home. It's heavy as hell. As I get older I regret the weight. A Little Giant 22 can be a 19', class 1A straight ladder and fit in your closet.
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Some recessed fixtures and under cabinet fixtures are coming with back stab connectors. Personally I love them, but like you said, they're too new on the market to know if they'll hold up long term

http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/prodcat.nsf/Tables/Push-In%20Connectors?OpenDocument

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VERY INTERESTING! Looks like what I need if I go that route. I will see if I can find them locally to give them a try.
http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/products.nsf/ItemMasterLookup/p30-085J?OpenDocument
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Let me be real clear. When I say I love them, I'm referring to their use in things like fixtures, where, if one fails, it will be easy to find and fix the open circuit. As far as power, outlet splices, I want a hard bodied wirenut and a nine inch lineman's pliers

http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/products.nsf/ItemMasterLookup/p30-085J?OpenDocument
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RBM wrote:

For me they leave a little nagging in the back of my head. Fortunately I know they are there, why they are there and what each of them connects. If one ever goes bad I know I can easily snip it off and replace with a regular wire nut.
To all - Another benefit. Its easy to add things if you leave an extra spot or two. I had a situation where I wanted to tap into a location for a fan/light. It was very easy just to stab into the connector I wanted to add this leg. The connectors used have 6 positions IIRC. Only 3 were used in the case of the one I tapped into. http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/products.nsf/ItemMasterLookup/p30-088J?OpenDocument
I suspect these were used by my contractor because they were probably virtually the same price as the smaller ones yet more flexible in their applications.
Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
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(snip)

http://www.idealindustries.com/IDEAL-EZ/prodcat.nsf/Tables/Push-In%20Connect ors?OpenDocument
Sure those are back-stab, and not just pre-made pigtails? Local big-box has those, where the spring inside the nut is connected to a wire leading out the hole in the back. Looks like it would be a real time-saver for production installs, if local codes allows it. Or were you talking about some sort of flat crimp connector, where you shove all three wires in seperate holes, and squeeze a blade down on them? I've never seen those used for a.c. lines before.
aem sends...
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For connections that you're pretty sure will be permanent, or where there's enough extra wire to make cutting and resplicing feasible, use crimp connectors (barrels). If you use the correct kind of crimping tool, these connections are far stronger than wire nuts.
These are about the best you can buy:
http://www.panduit.com/search/search_results.asp?NP00001+151&Ne=1&region=USA&Nu=P_RollupKey
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Thanks for the feedback but the connectors you link to look like they're only good for joining 2 wires, not the three wires I mentioned below. Or did I miss somethin'?
Thanks, Kevin
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No - you're right. I *believe* they make a 3 wire connector. Call them.
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In addition to what others have said, stranded wire pigtails are easier to push into the box than solid wire.
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snipped-for-privacy@blah.com wrote:

If you had a Buchanan C-24 and the proper sleeves (3M S60 have the capacity as I recall but they are uninsulated and would require shrink boots or tape) you could do each join in maybe 20 seconds and they would _never_ come apart even if you wanted them to.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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wrote:

Si, muchacho. BTW, it's little mistakes like this that will keep you from passing.

Kevin is a good name. No one will suspect it.
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
wrote:

One thing to watch, you just can't use a regular wire nut to bond the ground as you would hot and neutral. The ground circuit to other outlets/fixtures must be configured such that it is not disconnected as you work with the outlet/fixture. That means you can't remove whatever is bonding the ground circuit to attach a pigtail from the outlet.
The ground circuit must be crimped or something like the green wire nuts that allow a grounding pigtail to stick out from the end of the nut.
Thus I don't see how you planned on connecting the ground pigtail you already attached to the outlets. Perhaps you have thought this through and can do so without disconnecting the existing grounds while connecting on the outlet.
gerry
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gerry wrote:

Code citation?
bud--
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
wrote:

NEC 250.148 (B)
(B) Grounding Continuity. The arrangement of grounding connections shall be such that the disconnection or the removal of a receptacle, lunimaire (fixture), or other device fed from the box does not interfere with or interrupt the grounding continuity.
Can be read at
http://nfpa-acs-01.gvpi.net:8080/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7005SB
As an example, that's why the green wire nuts that let a pigtail stick trough the end without removing the wire nut exist. Other means are crimped on jumper which forces the grounding pigtail to be disconnected from the fixture. Taking a wire nut off the grounds to service a fixture is prohibited since it interrupts grounding continuity.
gerry
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gerry wrote:

In the case of a receptacle, a receptacle always has only one ground screw, so the ground is never wired through the receptacle. Detaching the ground wire from a receptacle will never interrupt the ground continuity. I see nothing that a green wirenut with a built-in pigtail adds to the ground continuity over a standard wirenut with a pigtail wire coming out of it.
Pigtailing out a ground wire with a standard wire nut also works for a fixture. If the fixture has its own ground wire it can be wirenutted to the pigtail ground wire.
The green wirenuts subract one from the number of wires spliced but have no other effect. Wiring can easily be done without using crimps.
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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth]
wrote:

Clearly you have never used them and had such work inspected. Certainly the last outlet in a chain is an exception UNLESS it is something like a metallic box which needs grounding.

Pigtailing from the ground bundle with a standard wire nut does not meet code and won't pass inspection where NEC used. (most locations)

Chose to ignore the NEC code if you wish. The green nuts have a hole to extend one of the existing ground wires for use as a fixture ground. This forces the ground to be disconnected from the fixture, taking the green wire nut off doesn't help when servicing the fixture since it's still connected, not a pigtail.
You asked for the code citation, got it.
gerry
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gerry wrote:

Explain how removing a single wire from a receptacle ground connection screw will "interfere with or intrerrupt the ground continuity" of grounds to parts of the circuit downstream from the receptacle.
Clearly I have never used green wire nuts and have had my work inspected.

It will meet the code anywhere the NEC (not local opinion) is enforced.

A wire pigtailed out from a standard wirenut can be disconnected from the fixture in the same way. The code does not mandate that installations be idiot-proof.

Thanks for the cite.
bud--

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