Tips for arthritic repair people

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On 3/8/2014 9:07 PM, joevan wrote:

What about lots of garlic and extra virgin olive oil? I use enough garlic when cooking to run off all the roaches in the house and the olive oil is one of the "good" oils you can consume. When I have olive oil, I use it instead of margarine on pasta to keep it from sticking together and cook with olive oil whenever I can substitute it in a recipe that calls for butter or margarine. I like garlic bread and usually spread butter/margarine on the bread the sprinkle garlic powder on it so I've got to figure out a way to do it with olive oil. I wonder if there is an olive oil spread produced by anyone? ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 09 Mar 2014 09:25:51 -0500, The Daring Dufas

They have figured out butter may be better for you than margarine.
If you want olive oil garlic bread, mince/crush garlic in a pan with a little olive oil and cook it until the garlic has started to brown, then spread that on your bread or just use it to dip the bread in. You can also put some italian herb/spice in there for another little bump.
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On Sun, 09 Mar 2014 09:25:51 -0500, The Daring Dufas

I use evoo on a lot of things. I also use garlic and janes garlic salt sometimes. I won't use margarine for anything but use butter on bread and in foods that I cook. If I use bread it is usually gluten free from whole foods or I make cornbread.
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On Thursday, 6 March 2014 10:15:46 UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

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Get a pair of high-grip gloves, the ones with the rubberized palms, and wea r 'em. Greatly reduces the muscle force you need to exert to grasp things. Less force on the joints and less fatigue. You'll notice the difference at the end of the day.
Use a cordless driver instead of a hand screwdriver for any job that requir es more than half a turn. Or find bit holder with a t-handle or ratchet han dle that you can operate with motions other than twisting your wrist.
Avoid lazy-man loads of multiple tools and parts crammed in one hand while you use the other one to open doors or climb a ladder. Use a tool apron tha t keeps both hands free, or a tool tray that you can carry comfortably and put down easily.
Minimize exposure to vibration from reciprocating tools, or shock forces fr om hammering. If you can't avoid forces, try the gel-padded shock-absorbing gloves.
Re-think tasks that require sustained static force from the affected joints . Use clamps, locking pliers, straps, bungees, cable ties, blocks and shims -- whatever -- for those loads, and save your hands for the skills that ne ed them. Engineer each job so that you can let go and give your hands a res t at any point; don't try to hold something in a difficult position with on e hand while you put the bolts on it with the other. Even if you expect the weight to be manageable, if the job takes longer than you expected you cou ld be stuck in a spot that gets less and less comfortable, and if that heav y thing starts to slip, it can take your hand or wrist into an angle you re ally don't want it to go.
Chip C Toronto
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On Thursday, 6 March 2014 10:15:46 UTC-5, Robert Green wrote:

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Chip, these are precisely the sorts of suggestions I was looking for. THANKS!
<Get a pair of high-grip gloves, the ones with the rubberized palms, and wear 'em. Greatly reduces the muscle force you need to exert to grasp things. Less force on the joints and less fatigue. You'll notice the difference at the end of the day.>
I have a 6" round textured rubber mat I got from a local plumber that helps in all sorts of jar opening and similar situations. FWIW, it was from "Joe the Plumber" - just not the famous one.
<Use a cordless driver instead of a hand screwdriver for any job that requires more than half a turn. Or find bit holder with a t-handle or ratchet handle that you can operate with motions other than twisting your wrist.>
Gave up manual screwdrives a long time ago. Wrist twisting has turned into agony at times. Got an assortment of electric screwdrivers, from pistol-gripped to tubular to a tiny one that takes jeweler's screwdriver tips.
<Avoid lazy-man loads of multiple tools and parts crammed in one hand while you use the other one to open doors or climb a ladder. Use a tool apron that keeps both hands free, or a tool tray that you can carry comfortably and put down easily.>
I have regrettably found that with arthritis, the old ways of being able to hold things like screws in my hand while I operate a tool are over. It's sort of like drinking water after your mouth is numbed with Novocaine. (-:
<Minimize exposure to vibration from reciprocating tools, or shock forces from hammering. If you can't avoid forces, try the gel-padded shock-absorbing gloves.>
Never heard of those but I think I will search Google for them. Thanks!
<Re-think tasks that require sustained static force from the affected joints. Use clamps, locking pliers, straps, bungees, cable ties, blocks and shims -- whatever -- for those loads, and save your hands for the skills that need them. Engineer each job so that you can let go and give your hands a rest at any point; don't try to hold something in a difficult position with one hand while you put the bolts on it with the other. Even if you expect the weight to be manageable, if the job takes longer than you expected you could be stuck in a spot that gets less and less comfortable, and if that heavy thing starts to slip, it can take your hand or wrist into an angle you really don't want it to go.>
Yeah, sadly I know all about pushing limits with bad results. I pushed too hard when cooking and a skillet filled with hot oil just fell out of my hand - fortunately no serious consequences but a reminder that a joint failure or a spasm can occur at the worst of times. I try to lay out all the tools I think I will need and then work out the job in my head to see if there are going to be any rough spots.
Thanks again for your input, Chip. It has been most helpful!
--
Bobby G.



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