Tinning Flux vs. regular flux for sweating copper

Awl--
I've always used "regular" flux for sweating, but the wife brought home, by accident, Oatey #95 *tinning flux*, which seems it might actually be a good idea, perhaps helping solder flow into the joint by "pre-wetting" it a little. I also have the Oatey #5 regular solder paste. Any opinions on which would better facilitate a fairly lengthy plumbing job I have ahead of me?
Any other tips? For example, is emery better than steel wool for cleaning joints? Is one solder better than another? etc. I'll be using a prestolyte-type setup w/ an acetylene B tank, doing mostly 1/2", but also some 3/4, 1", 1.25". I tend to be liberal w/ threaded adapters, for things like valves, check valves, and other stuff, as I'm more comfortable w/ the threaded versions of those, and have actually screwed a few up in the sweating process.
Also, any opinions on joint compound for threaded joints? I don't know if it's cheap fittings or just me getting old, but I've actually had to use plumber's string and dope to get rid of stubborn leaks. Someone recommended RectoSeal, which I bought but have not used yet. Pretty expensive.
TIA. -- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 12 Apr 2006 21:35:50 -0400, "Proctologically Violated©®"

I like the tinning flux...it flashes silver when the joint reaches temperature so it helps me not overheat the joint. Other than that, I don't notice much difference.
Personally, I prefer plumber's cloth to steel wool by far. And I don't try to use a single piece for more than a few joints. It cuts better when fresh, and it's cheap.
Other tips? Clean, clean, clean. After cleaning the pipe with plumber's cloth or the fitting with an inside brush, I give it a quick wipe with a clean rag to remove the grit and loosened grime. Then I flux imediately. I don't like to leave cleaned pieces sitting around for a long time before sweating them. I also like to clean the end of the fitting. I think it helps the solder form a smooth fillet.
If you have a lot of fittings to clean, cut the handle off a fitting brush and chuck it in a drill.
Take the time to remove the melted flux with a damp rag after the joints cool. And a piece of scotchbrite pad cleans the joint up nice after the wet rag.
Rectorseal's good stuff. Since I hate leaks, I use teflon tape AND rectorseal on threaded joints. Tape first, then the dope. Haven't had one leak in a very long time with that combo. But if you have a big job, get over your tendency to go with threaded versions and adaptors when sweat versions are available. It will save you a lot of pieces and a lot of joints.
Good luck with your project.
Paul
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good advice. Will check out plumber's cloth today. Esp. like the observation on cleaning the ends of fittings. I might get real stupid and touch them on a belt sander! Scotchbrite after sweating??? Beyond my psychological capacity! :)
I'll try to minimize adapters, to where I think I might change my mind about something or other later--easier to undo a threaded cap than sweat, etc. But indeed, straight sweating would save time.
I have put fitting brushes in a drill, but never used them on fittings!! Another good idea.
Greatly appreciate the input. -- Mr. P.V.'d formerly Droll Troll
wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have bought some wire cleaning brushes with the hexagon screwdriver base on them so they can fit the screwdriver fittings, etc. Better than trying to chuck a twisted piece of wire from a cut off handle -- cheaper too.
wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with Paul totally but he mentioned something you might not know what he was talking about, I didnt' at first. They make copper connectors with the solder already in them. Since I'm not a pro I had much better luck with those type. I added a little bit more solder even though you probably don't have to, but none of those leaked for me.
J
Paul Franklin wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to Joey, Thomas wrote:

I was wondering where to find these copper with solder in them. I've looked around and can not locate them. Thanks.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use the old 50/50 tin/lead mix instead of the new lead free stuff. Make sure the pipe and fitting are both clean and bright.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 13 Apr 2006 23:41:56 +0000, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Oh, good idea. That way when you sell your house the PC police can force you to replumb the entire house when you've been found to have "non-conforming" plumbing. No, I don't think there is anything wrong with Pb Plumbing, but it's simply not done anymore.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.