Timers for electric range top burners ???

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Is anyone aware of an electric range that has timers which can be set for the electric burners on the cooktop ??
Thanks ...
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Never seen one. Only for ovens. Probably doesn't exist because of the obvious safety implications. Even with an oven there is some risk, but with a stove top, I think it would be so risky that manufacturers would not make it.
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On Mon, 10 Jun 2013 10:01:45 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I asked this question a month or so ago. I think he is talking about a "turn off" timer, not a "turn on" timer. Basically you could limit the length of time a "left on" burner would burn.
I had a spring wound timer on the front 2 burners of my stove for years when my kid was just learning about cooking. She had to come back and check on what she was cooking every 15 minutes. Most of the time it was done by then anyway.
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On Jun 10, 12:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You are correct. I have no interest in turning the thing on when I'm not around, but if I get busy and forget about a pot on the stove, I'd rather it shut off, uncooked, than turn everything to carbon... The older I get, the more likely it is to happen. However , reading the various answers here, it looks like there isn't one available. I'm not interested in motion detectors, unless it is paired with a timer. Thanks for your reply.
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This is also an issue, surprisingly frequent, for persons with Narcolepsy a nd Cataplexy. So many times the food was burned, and way too many times al so, I have managed to regain function/wakefulness in the nick of time befo re fire resulted. Sad to say my only cooking resource is to 'nuke' everyth ing. Does anyone know of a 200V relay with adequate Amperage rating to set up as a timed "kill" switch for electric stoves?
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On Sun, 17 Apr 2016 10:17:03 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Get a 40a SSR. https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13015
That will run directly off of a solid state timer like a 555 or you can run it off a wall wart plugged into any small spring wound timer. I had one on our cook top when our daughter was learning to use the stove. I used a 15 minute spring wound timer.
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On Sun, 17 Apr 2016 10:17:03 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Forget that, what about plain old forgetfulness? As the population ages, more and more of us will soon be suffering more from various dementias.
Given that almost all modern ranges have electronic controls, I am at a loss to understand why safety regulators have not imposed timeouts on all stovetop controls. Each and every control should have a default (10 minute?) timeout which can be easily bumped up again by pushing an 'increment' button before it times out.
--
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On Monday, June 10, 2013 1:01:45 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've always thought that stove/ranges should have an auto shutoff timer fea ture. If the over/burners are on without any changes to the total power dr aw for more than 4 hours the whole thing should shut off. Bet that would p revent a fair number of house fires.
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in theory my induction cooktop has this feature, but I've never tried it out
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news:d36a80f8-3be9-4e82-91cf-'
<stuff snipped>
<I've always thought that stove/ranges should have an auto shutoff timer feature. If the over/burners are on without any changes to the total power draw for more than 4 hours the whole thing should shut off. Bet that would prevent a fair number of house fires.>
I think you're absolutely correct, so much so that I put my toaster oven on a 30 minute spring-wound timer outlet after it failed to shut off and nearly did burn the house down. I had put some english muffins in and went downstairs to look for something and when I heard the smoke detector, the kitchen was already engulfed in thick smoke and the muffins were little black hockey pucks. Of course, a 220VAC oven would harder to wire up that way, but I agree that such a fail-safe would likely prevent at least a few fires.
Cooking fires that start with left-on burners happen with alarming frequency to people suffering from diseases that affect cognitive functioning and often are the trigger for children moving their elderly parents into assisted living.
http://www.firesafetyfoundation.org/fire-safety-for-the-elderly.html
<<Americans over the age of 65 are one of the groups at greatest risk of dying in a fire. On average, more than 900 Americans age 65 and over die in fires. People over the age of 85 die in fires at a rate five times higher than the rest of the population. However, there are a number of precautionary steps older Americans can take to dramatically reduce their chances of becoming a fire casualty . . . Cooking accidents are the leading cause of fire related injuries for older Americans. The kitchen is one of the most active and potentially dangerous rooms in the home.>>
--
Bobby G.



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On 6/10/2013 1:59 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I think the reason that you don't see auto-shut-offs on cook tops is that appliance manufacturers don't want consumers using such a device as a timer rather than as a fail-safe shut-off. There would almost certainly be liability issues the first time someone had a fire and insisted that the auto-shut-off timer should have prevented it.
The motion sensor device to shut off the electricity after a short period of time does make some sense because it requires that the stove top be attended. A 15 minute manual timer connected to a relay that's connected to the cook top power would also be okay because it would constantly have to be reset. Ovens are less of an issue if it's left on unattended because a fire is much less likely.
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I suppose you're right. It does seem odd that people would find fault with a device that automatically shuts off the burners/range top since there isn't any sort of safety shutdown on them now. In addition to an auto-timer, ranges should have a remotely locatable temperature sensor that would shut down the burners if the temperature in the cabinets or range hood directly over the burners/heating elements reached a critical level. Considering all the safety devices that are developed for the electrical "grid" in the house (AFCI, breakers, GFCI's, etc) ranges and toaster-ovens seem pretty far behind the times.

Thanks for the idea, Steven. I could easily hook up the electric toaster oven to an X10 motion sensor and have it shut off the toaster oven if it's unattended for more than 10 minutes. Might even be possible to create a photocell sensor that detects when the inside of the toaster oven is too bright thus indicating it's on fire inside.
Since the toaster oven has a mechanical switch that has to be depressed to start the cycle I am not too worried about the X10 system inadvertently turning the unit on and starting a fire. It would take both the activation of the appliance module AND a press of the "start" button to turn it on. The motion sensor system would do away with having to start the separate timer for each use. Putting the toaster on an X10 module would be I could use a number of conditions to evaluate when to turn off power to the unit. I could even use a smoke detector to activate the shut-down sequence with a little soldering. I already have X10 compatible heat detectors that can be used to sense when the area above the toaster over is warm enough to indicate a potential problem.
I wish I could implement the same system to monitor the gas range. I suppose I could try to find an electronically controllable gas valve and install it on the gas line going to the stove. That way I could interrupt the gas flow to the stove when a hazard was detected just like I can control the toaster oven.
Not sure that would pass muster with the codemeisters but it should since the goal is to reduce the chance of a fire started by the range top. The biggest problem I can see is that the stove is pilot-lighted and when gas is restored, the pilot light must be relit. I suppose that's only a problem for devices with pilot lights since there's no "vampiric" gas flow to keep the pilot light going on piezo-starter equipped stoves.
It's easy to get distracted from cooking (like when I heard the neighbor's dog chewing up the mailman) long enough for disaster to strike.
--
Bobby G.




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On Mon, 8 Jul 2013 08:44:49 -0400, "Robert Green"

Yes I would probably use it all the time, the same way I use the sleep switch on my radio most of the time, not just when I'm intending to go to sleep but during the day too, so I don't have to remember to turn the radio off.

Good point. You've got my vote.

Except when there's a pan full of grease in the oven. Maybe when it's only 1/4 full.

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Trader4 is probably right. An oven bake element gets red hot, but it's hidden away inside the oven where it's not going to unintentionally start a fire. A burner element could easily do that if there are overhanging drapes from a window.
You could make such a thing with an electric hot plate and a digital timer.
Nowadays digital timers come with up to 20 ON-OFF cycles that can be set independantly throughout the day. A digital timer with a single on/off cycle would be all you'd need to turn on the electric hot plate for an hour or two each day.
But I've never seen a range timer control any surface elements either.
--
nestork


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On 6/10/2013 9:43 AM, Robert wrote:

It's a great idea, and it's been patented <http://www.google.com/patents/US5693245 but I've never actually seen one.
There's this unit: <http://www.cookstop.com/about_product.html but it's rather expensive and it turns off the whole cooktop and oven, not individual burners.
Now if you were willing to turn off the whole cook top (for a separate cook top anyway) you could have a timer connected to one of these <http://www.pool-spa-supplies.com/index.php/electrical/relays-contactors/contactor-3-pole-240v-50a-410305.html down where the cook top plugs in.
The reluctance on the part of appliance manufacturers to provide auto-shutoff timers on individual burners probably relates to legal issues. It might encourage people to leave cook tops unattended. OTOH, an automatic shut-off of the entire unit based on motion sensing might be okay.
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I looked up the "Cookstop" and it looks like it might do the job, but it costs more than the oven..... VERY pricey........
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On 6/10/2013 11:43 AM, Robert wrote:

There's an aftermarket device for ranges that sounds like it might fit the bill:
Stove Guard The Best Stovetop Fire Prevention System
http://stoveguard.ca/ or http://www.stoveguardintl.com/
For electric or gas ranges and cooktops. It's not cheap, but it's designed to automatically shut off when it detects no motion in the vicinity of the range after a certain period of time. It also has a programmable lockout mode to prevent people with cognitive disabilities from turning the stove on.
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On Monday, June 10, 2013 12:43:28 PM UTC-4, Robert wrote:

We bought an old house that had an old stove. We used the stove for years. It was an RCA and had only one of its burners controlled by a timer. It worked great and my wife loved it. Nothing since has been as good as the old RCA. And nothing has the great timer feature on a burner. It would se em that a lot of practical ideas of the past have been dispensed with now a nd people are unaware of an era when things had more good functions and le ss gimmicks. And lasted and were designed to be fixed. My Dad had a Cro sley Shelvedoor Refrig that was still working after 50 yrs. The door hinge pins were wearing out.
On Monday, June 10, 2013 12:43:28 PM UTC-4, Robert wrote:

We
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It probably resulted in people leaving there burners unattended. You could always wire a timer to a 110v burner.
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On Thursday, January 30, 2014 10:38:13 PM UTC-5, Bill wrote:

ars. It was an RCA and had only one of its burners controlled by a timer. It worked great and my wife loved it. Nothing since has been as good as the old RCA. And nothing has the great timer feature on a burner.

If you mean he could use a plug-in timer with a 110V hot plate, yes he could do that. If you mean actually re-wiring some appliance burner then that would mean it's no longer UL listed and code compliant.
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