tiling problem - curved wall

Hi, My bathroom has two wall joins that aren't at right angles to each other and almost constitute a curved wall. A builder tiling my walls has solved this problem by bringing both parts of a cut tile together at the "curve" without using spacers. I don't see how this can be grouted or sealed as there is virtually no spaces between the 2 pieces of tile. Before I ask him to do this part over, this time using spacers between the 2 pieces of tile, I need to feel confident that what he is doing is wrong. He says he can seal the join with mastic or other filler used over the top of the tiles, but this sounds messy and against the tile/grout ethic! I searched the group to see if this question had been asked before, but couldn't find an answer. Thanks and best wishes, Julie
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Your description as I understand it, does sound wrong to me. But is this area going to be wet? Floor or wall? inside the shower?
Mastic is an adhesive not a water proofing product.
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Sorry about this, I got my terms wrong. The builder is suggesting using either a thin batch of grout, or a silicon sealant. Unfortunately, my concern is that the space which he has allowed is too narrow to allow either of these substances to attach securely.
The areas in question are all over the bathroom - in the shower and in other areas where condensation is likely.
thanks for replying - your suggestions would be appreciated.
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Corners and bottoms of tile wall sections should never be grouted. They should have an 1/8 to 1/4" gap that needs to be caulked with a good grade of caulk. This allows for expansion/contraction/wall movement/tub flex, etc.
I don't understand how you have a tile wall that is not flat. It should have been straightened with mud or framing and wonder board before tile application.
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Julie wrote:

We had something similar sounding done when our living/dining rooms were tiled. I may have misunderstood what you describe, but here goes:
We have "sunken" living room, with about an 8" step the length of the rooms, and rail anchored into the face of the step most of the length (concrete slab floors). The plan, as described by the contractor, worried me but turned out beautifully. Where the square anchor meets the face of the step, he cut the (porcellain) tile in two, cut out the notches to fit around the anchor, then bedded the two parts as if one tile. Can't see it, even knowing it is there, but the rail helps conceal it. I had been shopping around for a small deco tile that could be placed along the face without any cutting, but the contractor's solution is fine. He tiled the face of the step before the top, so bullnose makes the top corner. He solved several worriesome issues that we would not have thought of if we had done the tile install ourselves.
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Julie wrote:

From my experience this is the way it's done. How wet will this area be? If the joint is tight mastic will seal it. Or maybe a nonsanded grout should work too.
Rich
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Rich, thanks for response. The areas in question are spread throughout the bathroom walls. Though none are within direct range of the shower or taps, all are prone to condensation (it's a small bathroom, without a window).
The builder has spoken in terms of 'making the grout into a paste' for this purpose - could be that he's thinking of the nonsanded option. I'll ask him - thanks for your suggestions.
Julie
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Julie wrote:

I'd use an acrylic caulk in such an application--it'll go into very small cracks much easier than a grout mixture (unless it's mixed so thin it'll be very prone to shrinking as it dries) and will be quite water-tight.
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It sounds like the same situation when the wall tile meets the floor tile in a shower. Usably the tile is butted without a gap and then caulk added. If your tile is in a wet situation there should be a water barrier under the tile. ( tar paper then floated or cement board then tile) Grout is not a water barrier, if there is no water proof membrane under the tile and it is wet area you have a problem. If the joint you are talking about is just a butt joint on a angle ( how I read it) I would do it the same way as the installer is. He might be worried the joint if grouted, the grout would crack. It's hard to say without seeing it and there is always deferent ways of doing things.
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