Tiles fell off in shower

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All it took was a little water to re-liquify the drywall mud and the tile drops off. I know, this happened to my shower that was built in the early 70s. Ripped it all out, javexed the mold, and rebuilt the shower with Wonderboard then installed new tiles with thinset. Lasted over 20 years, no signs of any failure.
wrote:

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any estimate on how long this kind of work may take. I am moderately handy in general. I am more disposed towards electrical stuff or carpenting though.
i
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wrote:

Avoid using real silicone on anything you won't in the future repair by completely removing. "Paintable silicone" caulk is not as strong, but may somewhat adhere to "real" silicone caulk.
Here's how I fixed the exact same trouble in a rental (green drywall over tarpaper over studs. tile adhesive to drywall): Condition: Edge of tub at corner (faucet and exterior walls), tiles falling off, drywall soggy. Remove exposed. Drywall let area dry. Insert 1-by-3 across behind drywall (in the hole) I think I glued it to the back of the drywall, and maybe adhesive to studs? I don't recall. I may have used drywall piece to replace the removed area (since I didn't expect the repair to last long). Be sure the drywall piece does not extend down to the ledge of the tub, else it will soak up water. Prime with good sealer shellac-based should be good (I don't recall if I used oil-based primer or shellac based).
This repair lasted for 3? 5 years? More? I don't recall. Place was sold within 10 years later.
Reset cleaned tile and simultaneously "re-grout" with lots of two-part epoxy, paste-type. Original grout had been white. The epoxy cures to somewhat pale greenish color and semi- gloss. Not worth worrying about, imo.
I did a lesser repair where the same green crap under a small window had become soaked underneath the tile. In that case I simply let the greencrap dry, since it was still strong (and well-backed since it had been laid over the sill framing). Then prime the crap, re attached the tile, and replaced the caulk in the window area.
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i forgot a step. i emulated the tarpaper vapor barrier somehow. overlapped with existing tarpaper, I slipped pieces either of tarpaper, or aluminum "flashing"
also forgot the last step. recaulk bottom edge of tiles at tub ledge.
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forgot to mentipn another rental tile on drywall (same era, 70's) soap dish was loose. i dried the drywall, primed, same paste epoxy. it's been good at least 7 years. (i check it often). the rest of the tile is ok, but someone used silicon along the bottom (ledge not aluminum doorframe) so i'm now dealing with that shit.
tile on anything but concrete and silicon (on anything but windows?) should be banned, imo
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Do yourself a huge favor. Carefully remove all the tile from all walls. Be careful not to break any. Lay down a drop cloth and maybe some cardboard to protect any that you may drop. Once you pull one or two off the wall, seven or eight will follow and you'll be wishing you had 4 hands. Maybe get an assistant to help you.
After all the tile is off, pull off all that drywall. Drywall in wet locations like showers or tub surrounds is a big No-No. Tiling 101. Replace anything that was behind the drywall that has been comprised by moisture (i.e. insulation). Let that area dry completely before moving on.
As mentioned in the quality post above, install cement board. This is the proper tile substrate for what you need. Do not use green board!!!
Reinstall tile, using a quality thinnest. Grout and finally seal your tiles.
If you need to use the shower during this project (form pulling the drywall to regrouting the newly reinstalled tile), install heavy plastic around the shower to prevent water from penetrating your work. Only remove the plastic once the grout as cured.
If done right, you will do this once.
Don't try and band aid this problem; you're only going to have huge headaches.
If you don't know how to install cement board, or do tiling do some research. There are plenty of great resources at your fingertips. There are way to many scenarios to speculate about here.
Good Luck.
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On 21 Feb 2006 13:26:33 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net

Thanks... I am leaning in this direction myself. I will be sure to ask for help with specifics. I think that my wife will want new tile, so, we'll destroy the old one with sledgehammer.
i
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Ignoramus15467 wrote:

You won't need a sledgehammer. Bust a hole with a hammer and then grab the edges and pull.
R
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As others have said, there's a reason those tiles fell off. Probably the most likely reason is water got through the grout or there's a leak behind the wall somewhere. You can glue em back on but you're only postponing the inevitable. Putting them back up there will just prolong the problem which ultimately needs to be fixed. I had a similar problem and ripped out the entire wall where the leak was and replaced the "green" drywall with durock. Took a few weekends to do it all but I'm confident it isn't coming down any time soon..... Cheers, cc
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enclosures and/or solid surface or faux marble panels, as an alternative to tile. No, not the thin flimsy ones installed as bandaids over rotted walls, the real thick ones designed for retrofits. Still need to do demo to make sure the walls are dry inside, and install whatever is called for behind to support the panels, but it could all be done and usable in one day. Yes, a quality tile job is prettier, but this is a basement shower, and one-piece walls will be more durable and easy to keep clean. And they are a lot easier for a non-expert to install than tile. Measure twice, cut once, etc.
aem sends...
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