Tiles - anti-slip - DIY products?

I live in Australia, and I've got some slippery ceramic tiles in my bathroom and shower, and I'm sick of using the shower mat because it causes mould. I've been looking at these various types of non-slip treatments about, and there are so many to choose from, I don't know which is best. When I made some phone calls, most companies offer an anti-slip service for your tiles, not a DIY product. From what I've found, most of these anti-slip products are made from some type of acid or another which mildly etches the surface of the tile, creating a very slightly rough surface. Can anyone offer any advice as to which type of acid or product is best? Ideally, I'd like to know what specific acid/active ingredient is best, which I can then source. The whole idea is to minimise the cost.
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Gas Bag wrote:

Assuming these are glazed tiles, the glaze is glass. The acid that eats glass is hydrofluoric. It isn't something I recommend you use. Instead, get one of the glass etching kits - DAGS - which also contain hydrofluoric acid but with other materials and are usually in a cream form. Be careful with them too.
Another way is physical etching; i.e., light sand blasting.
A third way is to embed something like pumice in a clear coat on top of the tiles. That will ultimately wear off but is easy to redo.
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dadiOH
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I suppose you've seen this - http://www.globalsafe.com.au/polyurethane.php . Seems several websites make mention of this product. There should be a way of finding a distributor (call and ask) or buying direct from the company.
This site mentions free samples for their anti-slip product (top right of page). http://www.slipstop.com.au /
Sonny
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Thanks for the reply. This is the stuff I've recently used:
http://www.dta-aus.com.au/products/AS1L - I'm fairly sure the active ingredient is Sulfonic Acid.
I've used it on some modern ceramic tiles in the bathroom and shower, and also on some (very) old outdoor ceramic or cement tiles with some sort of glaze or polish on them. It has worked incredibly well on the bathroom tiles - even better than I thought it would. But it has only had a tiny non-slip effect on the old, glazed, outdoor tiles. Do you know of any other products (or active ingredients) that work well on cement or ceramic tiles that have been glazed? I don't care if the stuff is corrosive, as I can always dilute it, but if it's toxic (e.g. Hydrofluoric Acid)....not happening. Sand blasting? Just not practical.
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On 8/16/2012 1:04 AM, Gas Bag wrote:

they make in-place sandblasting that have integrated suction, so they can be used in-home. contact a place that does shower doors and ask them if they have one.
hydroflouric acid isn't toxic. it just goes through your skin like it's not there, you can't feel it, and your bones dissolve (THAT is the painful part).
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email.me:
[...]

Wrong. HF is considered a contact poison.
From http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/073646799290211B
"Hydrofluoric acid is a toxic substance used widely in both industrial and domestic settings. It can cause severe burns, as well as systemic toxicity. Death has been reported from as little as 2.5% body surface area (BSA) burn involving concentrated acid. Topical and parenteral calcium salts have proven effective therapy for both dermal and systemic manifestations. All emergency physicians should be aware of the unique complications and treatment of these injuries."
Information from other sources, including MSDS documents, is easily available on the Web.
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