Tile Saw Question


I have a table saw style tile saw I've used for years and recently purchased a Husky tile saw with the motor mounted above. My question involves the water supply that wets (or in this case does not) the blade. The table saw style saws blade ran through a tub of water wetting the blade, and slinging water at me. The Husky saws water supply is behind and above the blade and does not, even after several modifications wet the blade. The RPM of the blade "blows" the water into the blade guard and it drips onto the tile, essentially dry cutting the tile. Any ideas? Should I just return it to HD? What model/brand over arm saw would you reccommend?
Thanks
Scot
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Hi all. I'm re-doing floor tiles in 2 bathrooms and was thinking about buying a small tile saw. There is one at a local hardware store for $150. It cuts tile and marble, is a 3/4 hp, includes a 7" diamond blade, rip fence and mitre gauge. I figure it will costs me almost as much to rent one on 2 occasions. I have a cheap manual tile cutter but it wopn't cut the porcelain tiles i'm installing. Oh yeah, the brand is Bolton Pro -7?? Anyhow any opinions appreciated. kudos Steve
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You might look into renting a water saw.

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steve wrote:

Any opinions, or any reasonable opinions? ;)
Your idea of buying one instead of renting makes sense. You might also want to think about turning around and selling it on eBay or Craigslist when you're done with it. That way you can get a better saw and still have it end up costing you about the same amount of money.
I'm not familiar with the tile saw you mentioned, but I would be cautious about the lower end saws. I don't know what size saw you need, but keeping in the 7" range...
MK is a good name - here's one on eBay with free shipping, a seller with perfect feedback and less expensive than the one you were looking at: http://tinyurl.com/68t2a
Here's another good brand - different type of saw, more like a table saw, and a bit more money: http://tinyurl.com/6ts4k
R
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While I'm a proponent of buying the best quality tools you can afford, unless you're planning on taking up tiling for a vocation those cheap wet saws work well enough. The $90 wet saw I bought from Lowes did my kitchen floor, kitchen extension floor, two full baths (including a zirconia tile shower enclosure... very tough stuff), an exterior deck (slate), a 3/8" marble tile entry floor, a kitchen backsplash and two end table tops (slate):
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/basement/IMAGE120.jpg
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/miscellaneous/tile002.jpg
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/kitchen/image031.jpg
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/bathroom/bathbuild8.jpg
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/kitchen/kitchen01.jpg
http://www.magpie.com/house/photos/miscellaneous/image011.jpg
I've changed the blade twice (~$20). While higher-end saws are more precise, the kitchen tile floor is 1.5" hex tiles and it worked fine for that.
The main downside with cheap wet saws is that they're messy as hell. Either do your cutting outside or protect the walls and floors with plastic sheets.
Steve Manes Brooklyn, NY http://www.magpie.com/house/bbs
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Steve Manes wrote:

I like the entry.
R
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steve wrote:

I'm in the middle of several small tile projects. The cheap score and snap tool I have works as long as I'm taking off a large enough section of tile. For smaller and other difficult cuts I thought about buying a wet saw and called the place I bought my tile from to ask for advice. They offered to cut them for me (no charge). Lowe's around here will also cut tile for .25/cut (came in handy on a sunday when the tile shop was closed). It's a small hassle to drive somewhere but worth it. Not only the money, but the potential trouble and mess of using a low-end saw.
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Charles Spitzer wrote:

Hi charlie.
Interesting site. Do you have art displayed there?
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I most likely would return it. What you describe can not be proper.
My el cheapo, blade above a sliding table from Harbor Fright uses a fork like affair to deposit the water onto both sides of the moving blade at something between the 4 and 5 clock position. It does sling water forward and away from the user.
Colbyt
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Don't know about the Husky but check the water pump and the water line. Disconnect the line at the pump and see if the pump is primed and then blow through the line to clear it - that always work for me and then you should have a strong spray at the cutting edge.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)65285059/ref=sr_1_4/102-0191549-5968138?ie=UTF8&s=hi
I have a 10", 2hp, QEP like the above except single speed and its a workhorse. If I had more money to burn, I would have gone for a MK Diamond.
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What's wrong with the water-tub style? I've used one for some time, and i love it... Well, except for combing the chunks of glazing out of my hair... ya, i see your point now.
For sale, one tub-style water saw. ;-)
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