tile - changing color via a newer process?

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I have some lovely 70's light green tile in a shower that a Realtor indicator could be changed to a more neutral color with a new process that's inexpensive, fast to do and you can use the same day after it's processed.
I _think_ this may be known as reglazing, but I'm not certain.
Anyone have any more info on that? I've googled and found some refereences to a Glasstech 9000 process, but remarkably little seems to be said about this process as a whole. I'm considering it as a means to dress up a bathroom in preparation for home sale and would welcome any further to educate myself on choosing refinishers to do this work.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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it's a paint, and no, it's not worth it. give the buyer a tile allowance or price the house less to start with.
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The only "reglazing" that I have seen is for bathtubs. A friend checked into it and it was more expensive than replacing the tub... which we did.
Put the home on the market and see what happens. Clean and uncluttered works for me. If the home does not sell or offers are way below what your asking then consider spending the money
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Todd H. wrote:

WTF does a realtor know???
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G Henslee wrote:

What superficial cosmetics cab make a house sell faster, maybe???
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Ding! :-)
This is a quite updated yet 1970 construction home, and the blue/green aquamarine tile color is the last vestige of anything predating the last decade, so this tile is begging for an update. When I found out I could get it turned white and have it still look like tile for about $400 I was pretty intrigued.
This process seems interesting because so few folks--including some very experienced pro's I've talked to in my neighborhood, and pro-sumer grade rehabber types--seem to be informed about it.
I've had 2 estimates on the job from tub/tile reglazing guys today--both within about $15 of each other. Neither mentioned a franchise or anything--one mentioned that he uses 2 different suppliers of tile reglazing materials, so it didn't seem like super secret hush hush stuff. He'll be able to match my bathtub color as he has several shades of white available. Both were independent 1-man operations in the yellow pages under "bathroom updating" or some such. Barring anything new here, I'm inclined to work with the first guy that's available.
Anyone else with any direct experience with the process I'd welcome any insights!
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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"Todd H." wrote:

No direct experience -- my experience has been that all the providers I've been aware of were either franchises or guys who had bought the initial training then went on their own. There was a big stink in E TN over this when the franchiser tried to sue/close down a couple of guys there for "trade secret" infringement. There's a new service here in town who just started up--bought the training from an outfit online like the "Make A Million In Real Estate" and "Refinish Furniture for Mucho Moolah" or "Be A Quantum Mechanic--Eat Steak!" shills. What success he's had I don't know.
I really don't know how successful the rework is for more than a short time--I have doubts that it would be a good investment in the long run but might pay in a short-term scenario such as yours although it could turn out to be a disservice to the new owner. That could get into some nebulous areas re: disclosure, etc.
Curiousity--did either of these guys provide a longevity warranty?
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

Specifically, WTF does a realtor know about a tile reglazing technique. Answer is they don't know shit about it. Most realtors know 2 things. Charge 6% or more to list the property and then turn it all over to a title company to process when a buyer comes along. Secondly they know how to keep their license to steal current with the state.
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This particular realtor I spoke with appears to know more than most here on the subject at hand--i.e. that the process exists and does deliver a neutral color on existing tile in good condition for about $400. The more I talk to the reglazing guys (I've spoken with 3 now), they all say "Yeah I hear 'i didn't know that was possible' at least once a day."
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Todd H. wrote:

If you consider this you should contact a licensed pro. It's a process that takes careful thorough preperation and application.
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Oh absolutely! I wouldn't dare deal with some of the fairly nasty chemicals here myself. Thanks for the reply.
Here's a web page of a place that appears to use the Kott system that one of the folks I'm considering uses. It appears to have lower toxicity and better adhesion than competing processes, but has a longer drying time (72 hrs). http://www.customglaze.com/about_resurfacing.html
I need to circle back and find out more details on the process used by the other folks I've talked to.
Thanks all for the input. -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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from web page supplied " If you would like a complete copy of the testing reports as well as a specially prepared report on the dangers of urethane paints, ask Custom Glaze for the details, we will be happy to forward those reports to you. "
http://www.ecohome.org/ecolution/eco_renovation/6eco_ren.html
My searches with Google seem to indicate that the product has been around for some time. (Unbeknownst to me) Kott franchises the products so your left with the installer. $400 bucks for a tile tub surround seems cheap to me. But what do I know.
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Correct. The Kott dudes don't use the urethane paints, so they're marketing to highlight dangers of the competing process.

Yeah, I guess it's been around for 15 years or more.

Yes it does seem very cost effective, hence the appeal!
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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snipped-for-privacy@toddh.net (Todd H.) writes:

Ah, here's the manufacturer's page: http://www.kottkoatings.com/koated_gallery.html
Durability appears to be the only outstanding concern. The franchisee I talked to guarantee for 90 days, but mentioned apartment clients, and satisfaction, and the usual stuff.
-- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Tile is created from clay and then baked in a kiln once for color and then again for the glaze. Anything that can take that out and still meet the EPA guidelines for $400, I am interested in.
$400 says to me epoxy paint.
I am in suspenders, post the information from the realtor. Phone number, address, name, web page etc... Me thinks that when the request for info comes there will be a stalling tactic or "that is not what I meant."
--------snipped----------------------
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SQLit wrote:

"Reglazing" is misleading, even though the guys that do their finish's glaze. I would hope that most people understand they are not getting their tile actully 'reglazed'. Refinishing would be a better term.
Depends upon what the definition of is, is I spose.
The 'refinishing' process as stated by one contractor goes:
Step 1: Strip out the old caulk form around the tub and unscrew the overflow plate (when possible) Step 2: Set-up our powerful negative ventilation system & chemically clean the tub and lightly sand it. Step 3: Remove the drain cover, clean & sand the area. Step 4: Acid etch the tub removing the old finish leaving it dull and ready to prime. This step is key! Step 5: Repair most chips 100% free using a special patching compound. Step 6: Sand and blend the patched areas and sterilize the entire tub. Step 7: Mask off the entire room including the floor. Step 8: Set-up our hot turbine air compressor & remote air supply Step 9: Apply the chemical primer including a powerful bonding agent designed to bond to ceramic. Step 10: Spray 2-3 coats of primer and allow it to dry. Step 11: Tac-cloth and smooth the tub and install your free glazed in anti-slip grip base. Step 12: Mix our 2 part top coat consisting of a catalyst & resign, let it induct & prepare to spray the top coat. Step 13: Spray the tub giving you a total of 6+ coats leaving you with amazing like new results. Step 14: Clean up and remove the masking and pack up our equipment. Step 15: Caulk the tub & put back any hardware that was removed
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G,
This is indeed what the process I had done by a franchiee of Kott Koatings http://kottkoatings.com/ did for my bathroom described above, and it was a fantastic success. A 2 person team came with one focusing on the labor intensive prep work and the other doing the coating itself and donning the big honkin respirator. The friggin tile looks brand new, a brilliant white, and all the icky green of the old tile and the stained grout are now a lovely uniform shade of white. For a whopping $375.
This process took 72 hours to be ready for showering. This is by no means a low odor process--it stinks to high heaven, but is habitable within an hour after they're done. I'd give a solid 2 days before showing the place to anyone though. For showering, I gave it 72 hours, caulked the area with 100% silicone caulk, and gave it another 24 hours for the caulk to cure and it has been a joy to look at versus the old green aquamarine eyesore tile. It literally looks brand new--and surely looks a better than I could've done retiling, that's for damned sure.
Thumbs up--the process works, and is pretty amazing. Interesting how so few people know about it.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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refinishing processes for hard surfaces- tile, tub, siding, your car, whatever. A fresh paint job on anything usually looks better- the trick is putting on a finish that holds up. Hope your refinish job holds up, but I still have my doubts about durability. Seen too many failed tub 'reglaze' jobs.
aem sends...
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Even if it's total crap in 5 years, it's still 5 years where it's NOT blue/green aquamarine. :-)
But according to this individual's references which I checked, he's been doing their rental unit tubs/tiles for over 8 years and they haven't had any problems.
Durability is the concern, of course, but on the bang/buck scale, it's very hard to argue against the aesthetic bang you get out of this process, even if it only lasts 5 years.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Dear Todd, I just want to let you know about Hard Tops, a company specializing in refinishing for over 15 years. The owner formulated his own methods and products, and are proving to be the best in the world. The products and processes are exclusive to Hard Tops + Affiliates. The life expectancy of the polymerized acryllic urethane coatings are over 15 years, and you get a 1-year warranty on the work. Check out the website to find a refinisher near you: http://www.hardtops.com/affiliates.asp Also, feel free to give Hard Tops a call @ 1-800-687-7188 if you would like to know more about the company. Todd H. wrote:

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