Tightening dryer hose

Looking for a more secure way to tighten the dryer hose to the dryer.
The bottom part of the dryer hose comes out from time to time. I rely on the friction between the dryer receptor and the hose's plastic sheathing to hold it in place. I thought of putting in a clamp, but the hose goes in too far into the dryer. Thus, it would be too difficult or impossible for me to tighten.
I thought of drilling a small hole in the plastic sheathing and dryer receptor. Then putting a pointed screw in at an angle. I can't put it straight in as the receptor is somewhat inset into the dryer.
Any ideas on how to secure this better?
Please note, this plastic sheathing is not very flexible. I even have trouble from time to time with the other end of the hose coming out. It has a clamp. I tightened it pretty good today. Hopefully, it will hold.
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If you come up with a product that will cure this, please let me know. I will back you financially 100%. I have never seen anything that works worth a darn. Big hose clamps. Pull ties. Big snap rings.
And then, you have to pull the washer out to get back there to the dryer, climb in, get on your knees, work in a confined space, leave enough on there so you can pull out the dryer to work but not so much so when you push the dryer back that it crimps the hose.
SHEESH! Hasn't any of those engineers considered a top exhaust? Living with that and the looks of it is a heck of a lot easier than putting on the hose and keeping it on. I'd definitely buy one. TODAY!
Steve
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Perhaps epoxy glue - either metal to plastic or glue a metal extension onto the drier and then clamp the hose onto the extension.
Charlie S. wrote:

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I have put an aluminum 90 degree elbow on the end of the vent hose where it goes into the dryer. Just push the other end of the elbow into the dryer. No need to use a clamp. When you push the dryer back in place, the elbow stays there. They only way it can come out is to move the dryer out again. The elbow is from any hardware store and is made for a solid pipe system.

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John Lawrence wrote:

A variation on this method........I use aluminum duct tape to tape a 90 onto the dryer outlet. There is "supposed" to be enough clearance between te dryer & the wall to make room for the vent hose.
I hose clamp the alluminum flex hose to the 90 on the dryer and the vent in the wall or floor.
To get over the "how do I have room to work & how keep the hose out of the way".
I crreate "sevice loop" with the aluminum hose that goes straight up off the dryer 90 & then a gentle 180 back onto the wall or floor outlet.
This arrangement adds about 4 or 5 feet of hose & the joints (not great) but it sure beats the "crushed hose" & allows the dryer to be moved easily for cleaning the vent & laundry room.
cheers Bob
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snip
I have a very low-tech solution that works well for me, but it's far from elegant. I duct tape over the connection. ( The hose clamps don't work worth a damn for me, either. )
I can't figure out what no one has come up with a better attachment, either.
Donna
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The PLASTIC hose is a severe fire hazard, just take a little piece and try sertting it on fire, you much better off with the flexible metal type
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(I think). The connecting unit is a hard plastic.

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Screws in a dryer vent can catch lint and build up a big gob over time.
Clamps and/or duct tape is your best bet. Yes, all dryer connection pretty much are a PITA.
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But you (he) should not use the cheap fabric duct tape but the stuff made from Al foil. It doesn't "dry out." It's so thin that if you make a mistake you just cut the joint and put another layer on.
The fabric "Duct Tape" is worse than useless. It sticks well enough to leave a mess but not well enough to do the job.
In our place, I replaced the flexible Al duct with sections of standard metal duct made from plated steel (which I held together at most connections with the Al duct tape.) I kept one (and only one) connection "loose" so that I could move the dryer if I had to get behind it or the washing machine. The only problem with the metal stuff is cutting it to length: you need some good quality "tin snips" but MAYBE a fine tooth blade in a "jig saw" might work.

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Never knew about this type of tape. Thanks.
I may have inadvertantly solved the problem tonight. I am not sure. I took the hose off and pushed it in again. Seems this time the unit went in a bit further asI felt it click into place. Don't know if that happened before or not. Have the feeling it's in there pretty securely. Time will tell.
Thanks everyone for your help. Hopefully the other end won't come out either.

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The "standard" size (2"?) is stocked by HD. It's always found in the insulation section where it is used to cover joints in that fancy aluminized mylar bubble insulation. Sometimes it finds itself among the duct sections.
The "pros" use wider versions of the same stuff and I have seen it used is new(er) HVAC installations. It's definitely "gud enuf" for dryers and HVAC stuff. For stove/water heater flue I suspect it would fail but that's where your are SUPPOSED to use the sheet metal screws.
Once you have a roll of the stuff you quickly find other uses for it. After all, it is DUCT TAPE!

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Charlie S. writes:

Vinyl duct hose is a fire hazard and does not meet code in many jurisdictions. Use aluminum.
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The hose is aluminum.
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glad to hear its not plastic hose. I have a friend with that and her hubby is a volunteer fireman, thought he would know better.....
that whte plastic duct hose with metal ring in it was awesome, except it burns so easy. not a good combo around a dryer
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