Tie to attach joist to beam above it

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Could you explain what the advantage is to putting the new beam on top of the joists instead of in line with the joists (so the bottoms are lined up)? The latter seems much simpler in a variety of ways, but perhaps I'm missing something.
Thanks, Wayne
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One advantage is not having to build shoring walls to carry the load while you cut the joists to be able to struggle, and I do mean struggle, to get the beam up between the cuts and then install the joist hangers. Depending on the length involved and the clearance you are willing to allow on the joist hangers, you are asking a lot to have a beam straight enough to slide right up. You need to have the new beam in location under the cut before you install the shoring walls.
If it is going to be an attic space or other use where the beam on the "floor" won't create a problem, it can be an elegant solution.
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The guy I used to work for had the exact same thing done in his house. They had part of a load bearing wall opened up and did not want the supporting beam it required to be in the room, so it was installed in the attic, just as the OP is wanting to do. However. if I ever saw how it was attatched to the joists, I do not remember. Larry
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This is a perfect topic. I'm in the midst of doing this right now. Heres what Im up against
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c172/jetmech727/scan-1.jpg
I'm removing the wall in question. The joists that span over it are 2x5's I think. They run 10 feet and sit on top of the wall in question, then continue on another foot and are face nailed to a 2X5 joist running from an inside load bearing wall to the back wall. I cut the sheetrock from under that joist and slipped in a joist hangar on each joist. Then i went up and installed two 2x12's that also sit on the middle load wall and span over to the back wall. I then nailed and screwed the original 2x5 joist to the sistered 2x12. Do you think this will be enough support? The 2x12 witht he 2x5 nailed to it span 11 feet. When I ripped the plaster off the wall to expose the studs, I noticed that all the studs were pretty loose. I figured if there was a big weight load on them, then would they not be under compression? I can see the nail shanks on some of them coming through the top plate.
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

You did, see quote below my comment. He is taking out a load bearing wall below and wants a flat ceiling it seems. I have the same type thing in my home, but mine has an overhead engineered truss through the center instead of the overhead beam that uses angle iron straps like I suggested. Quote "I don't want to just hang the beam, I want it on top (because I am removing a wall below and don't want it to show). The beam will be supported with blocking at both ends, so the beam will still support the joists. I looked through the simpson site and didn't see anything that jumped out at me for this." End Quote
Tom J
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wrote:

If he puts it above, I'm curious how he plans to get the beam up there. Poke a hole in the outside wall above the ceiling line? Unless the space is wider than it is long, or there is access from another floor into one end of the space, it is gonna be hard getting it up there through a joist space.
aem sends...
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I don't really understand your project, but welding is a lot cheaper than I imagine it. The guy around here is in a suburban, neighborhood welding shop. I don't know what the bulk of his work is, but the last pair of things he welded together for me cost about 10 dollars. Another guy on the opposite side of town was going to charge about the same, but I didn't have the parts with me. In my case, the two parts belonged to me. I suppose he'll charge a bit to provide the steel.
It's good for you to look into this. Maybe you are like me. I always imagine that something I have never bought before, and that my parents had never bought, is very expensive. Lucite, foam rubber, welding were all much cheaper than I imagined. The 6 x 12 piece of lucite I wanted was a dollar! I thought it would be much more.
Of course in this case, I don't know how complicated the bracket is, and I could be wrong. :) but check.

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replying to Ed, Raquesh wrote: Hi Ad, Just wondering if you found a solution yet. I know exactly what you are talking about because I am faced with the same problem - Beam above the joists. How to hang the joists. I do know it is being done when they do not want to expose the beams, but no one will tell me how
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