Thunder

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On 1/8/2016 10:01 AM, KenK wrote:

A lot depends on how the services (phone, electric, etc.) get to/into your house. The rest depends on the proximity of any strikes! :>
Here, our services are entirely below grade (we don't even have street lights) so we see very little ill effects from storms. I have ~15 (?) PC's plugged in all the time (usually behind outlet strips or UPS's) with at least 3 running at any given moment. Five printers, four scanners, 9 monitors plus a slew of oddball "peripherals".
And, that doesn't count the TV's and other bits of kit littered around the house.
Only time I can recall a problem was living in Denver with overhead services. A nearby lightning strike (close enough to "magnetize" the TV!) fried the protection diodes in the no-name telephone. (aside from the TV needing a wicked degaussing, nothing else in the house was affected)
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KenK expressed precisely :

I unplug My power to My radio equipment, and unplug the coax.
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I've probably lost at least 10 modems over the years from lightning. Some were even killed when my computer and modem turned off. I began unplugging the phone line at all times when the modem is not in use, and shutting off the computer whenever I hear thunder coming close. Three years ago, I lost one, just because I was loading the weather reports when I should have shut off the system sooner.
I'm in the country, and at the end of the power and phone lines. I have everything well grounded. I only have dialup via buried copper wire. I now know that there is no solution except unplugging the phone line. Those modems just cant handle the surges. I have never had a phone or answering machine ruined.
My biggest problem is remembering to unplug it. Sometimes I forget and am not home when a storm hits.... However I have been pretty good at unplugging it these days, automatically whenever I shut off the computer.
In my opinion, those surge protectors are worthless for lightning.
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On 1/9/2016 7:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

must be inexpensive. I have at least one modem on the shelf I can't stand to throw away. Though I doubt i'll need it again.
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On Sat, 9 Jan 2016 20:26:25 -0500, Stormin Mormon

but they will protect quite effectively against induced surges from near misses (or even long distance misses) which used to kill modems regularly. Later modems were a LOT more resistant to those induced spikes.
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On Saturday, January 9, 2016 at 8:32:13 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Unrelated technology changes or spike specific design improvement?
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

digital? Post modem? What does that mean? Talking about early acoustic modem at like 300 baud? If you get direct hit, pretty well every thing is toast.
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On Sat, 9 Jan 2016 18:11:46 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Integrated circuits instead of discrete circuitry likely helped., but they added much better surge protection on the boards as well.
"software modems" which offloaded a lot of processing from the modem to the computer may have also helped.
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On Sat, 09 Jan 2016 20:32:12 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Direct lightning strikes are actually pretty rare, even here in Florida where we have thunderstorms all the time. We had one today. Good surge protection DOES work but it is not just plugging in a protector and calling it a day. You need to have layers of protection connected to a good grounding system. I have a weather station, connected to a PC and the sensors are on a pole with a lightning rod on top. It has been hit twice that I know of for sure. The first time I lost a serial port. After working on the protection more, the second hit just caused a reboot on the PC and all was OK. I have a dish, TV antenna, 5 TVs, 8 PCs and nothing ever gets unplugged. It is all about protection.
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I wonder if there is some sort of auto disconnect that would unhook the phone line. Could it tied into a light switch, for example? There must be something available with all these wireless gizmos nowadays.
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When lightning travels over 1000 feet in the air, a simple short throw switch is not going to do much.
Just turning off a device is almost no protection. It must be unpluged and the plug moved away from the source.
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On 1/9/2016 9:17 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

No, it really only needs to be farther than the next lower impedance path. Like the issue of being chased by a bear in the woods: you don't need to be able to outrun the BEAR, you just need to be able to outrun at least ONE of your COMPANIONS! ;-)
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Best defense is to unplug. If you can't do that, next best is a combined surge protection device that combines the phone line and power line so that they share the same protection ground as the PC. This minimizes the transient difference between the power line and thehone line. M
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Best defense is to unplug. If you can't do that, next best is a combined surge protection device that combines the phone line and power line so that they share the same protection ground as the PC. This minimizes the transient difference between the power line and thehone line. M
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Oren posted for all of us...

He needs a different kind of "protection" or maybe we do-from him.
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On 1/8/2016 12:01 PM, KenK wrote:

There are surge protectors that include phone line protection.
I'm on cable but have UPS and surge protector on computer and a few years ago surge from high tension line falling on low tension line blew out all my home surge protectors but only loss of equipment was a microwave oven not on one.
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