Three-way switch with on/off indicator

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Are there three-way switches that have indicators (e.g. a light) that tells you whether the circuit is on or not?
I checked a couple of stores online, and there are lighted three-way switches, but they don't say that they are the type I need.
The reason is that there are two three-way switches on an outside light, and you can't see the outside light from one of the switches so you don't know whether it is on or off.
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On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 00:22:13 -0400, Jan Philips

Please give urls for the ones you found.
What's the difference between the type you need and other types?

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wrote:

Lighted switches are NOT indicators. If you need a pilot on a 3 way you are going to need to add it as an extra switched load. Absolutely no other way around it. (other than fiber optics or a mirror mounted on a post that you can see from the window or door where the switch is located)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nope.
If you connect a neon lamp (inside the switch) between the traveler terminals on a 3-way switch, the neon lamp will be on (for both 3-way switches) when the load is turned off. I assume they do the same thing on 4-way switches.
There is a little more complicated indicator lamp in 3-way (and probably 4-way) switches where the indicator is on when the load is on. Probably requires a neutral connection to the switches.
It is not rocket science - they are readily available.
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Somewhat OT. I have a regular switch for my outside light that lights when the outside light is on. The curious thing is that my electrician put it in using existing wiring and there is no neutral in the box. The house is 70 years old and there are only 2 wires in the box and the box is not grounded.. How is that possible?
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On Sat, 3 Jul 2010 01:35:13 -0700 (PDT), Michael

If there are only two wires in that box one wire is hot and one wire is common. You have no ground in that box. That's the way houses were wired 70 years ago.
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On 07/03/2010 08:12 AM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

or one wire is hot and one is a switch leg, which IMHO is more common.
nate
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wrote:

Either way, his question was how does the light switch light when the outside light is on?
Clare mentions a neon light, but they light when the outside light is off.
I can't answer Michael's question. Maybe someone can.
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mm wrote:

How about a PR2 flashlight bulb: 500ma at 2.38V. In series with a 60W load, it would take 2% of the power.
To avoid exposing the flashlight bulb to the starting surge, you could bypass it with a thermistor having a positive temperature coefficient.
If the load drew more current than the indicator bulb, you could bypass the indicator bulb with a resistor. In that case, a thermistor with a negative temperature coefficient in series with the bulb (but not the resistor) would protect it from starting surges.
Another approach might be to use a step-up transformer with a low primary impedance in series with the load to provide voltage for a neon indicator across its secondary.
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On 7/3/2010 2:36 PM, J Burns wrote:

There are light switches that have a separate light. They fit a duplex outlet plate and I believe the switches are available in three way.
http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU212933
TDD
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On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 20:13:24 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Cooper Wiring Devices 294LA-BOX Three Way Switch & Red Neon Pilot Light
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On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 20:13:24 -0500, The Daring Dufas

But isn't this two separate things on one strap and it's up to the user to make sure it works the way he wants it to?
Three Way Switch & Red Neon Pilot Light No promises. No statement that the neon light goes on when the circuit is on.

Break off provision for wiring on same circuit or separate circuits

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The Daring Dufas wrote:

As quoted above, Michael says his switch box is not grounded and has only two wires. He says the indicator light is on when the outdoor light is on. With only a hot wire and a load wire, how would you connect your neon indicator light to come on when the outdoor light came on?
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On 7/4/2010 11:36 AM, J Burns wrote:

Perhaps I'm suffering from premature postification again? 8-)
TDD
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No, the OP's question was:
"Are there three-way switches that have indicators (e.g. a light) that tells you whether the circuit is on or not?"

It still "tells you whether the circuit is on or not". The neon is lit when "not".

Maybe if you read the question as asked...
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Why bring the OP into it? Michael's question is quoted above.
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Because I'm getting lost in references?
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On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 19:27:45 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

The neon light I was talking about lighted with the light on - but I was under the impression it required a separate dedicated neutral. Apparently just a ground is legal.

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On Sat, 03 Jul 2010 23:04:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's as I understand it too, as long as it's in the leakage range.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

As RBM wrote "Pilot light switches are lit when the circuit is on, and illuminated switches are lit when the circuit is off." Both of these have the light in the handle of the switch (not a separate pilot light).
"Illuminated switches" are easy - as I said before you connect a neon lamp between the traveler terminals If you work out the circuit, this is the same as connecting a neon lamp across a single-pole switch.
"Pilot light switches" from Leviton require a neutral connection - I believe that is true for all of them. They don't use a ground connection. The circuit for one that I saw had resistors from each traveler terminal to a common point. A neon lamp connected from that point to a neutral.
Both of these use current through the load to light the neon lamp. If a light bulb is burned out they will not work. They may or may not work with fluorescents (CFLs).
------------------------- All switch straps that are metal these days have a ground screw. If the switch is not installed in a metal box you have to ground the strap. The strap is grounded so any metal plate - present or future - will be grounded.
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