threaded wire connectors

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wrote:

You've just done a great job of proving your lack of logic, forethought and perception. Perhaps you need to stop doing anything for anyone but yourself.
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wrote:

for anyone but myself before you get your whole leg in your mouth.
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JC wrote:

were close to the surface, but how would I know it was the right box?
How would I locate a hidden junction box with just a multitester? How much damage would I do if I cut my way to it? How could I be sure the hidden box I found wasn't live?
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Don't how *you* would. Perhaps you would call an electrician.
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Or perhaps you're just making stuff up. Do tell -- how do *you* locate a hidden plastic junction box with just a multitester?
This oughta be amusing...
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I'm not interested in amusing you. Try it and maybe you can figure it out.
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your time trying to claim that plastic junction boxes cannot be found with a multi tester. I suppose there are hundreds of different kinds of multi testers and perhaps that's why you just don't get it.
The SureTest Circuit Tracers are powerful, versatile, easy-to-use troubleshooting test tools for finding breakers and hidden wire problems in residential/commercial/industrial environments. These tracers work on energized and de-energized circuits. They identify circuit breakers, find opens and shorts, and trace wires behind walls and underground.
Each kit contains the same transmitter (TR-958) and test lead kit (TL-958). The 958 also has the high-end Receiver (RC-958), adds an Inductive Clamp (IC-958) with Battery Pack (BP-958), and a larger Hard Case (C-958).
Features:
a.. Numeric value and audible signal provide quick and easy-to-understand tracing feedback b.. Receiver display rotates automatically for easy viewing c.. Identifies breakers and fuses d.. Can be used on circuits de-energized/energized 0-600V AC/DC e.. Kit includes: a.. Transmitter b.. Receiver c.. Tracer Test Lead Set d.. Inductive Clamp e.. Battery Pack f.. Hard Carrying Case g.. Batteries h.. Instructional DVD Spec Summary:
Transmitter Operating Frequency: 32 kilohertz, fixed-amplitude, time-modulated signal Current Output of Signal: 200mA p-pmax into 50 ohm Voltage Output of Signal: 30V nominal (2 watts) Operating Voltage: 0 600V AC/DC Battery Power: 1.5V x (4) AA batteries (NEDA 15A, IEC LR6) Battery life: 40 hours open circuit testing / 25 hours short circuit tracing Indicators: On/Off, Line energized, Low battery Receiver Sensing: Magnetic Maximum range: 15 feet underground Signal response: Numeric display and Audible beep Battery Power: 1.5V x (3) AA batteries (NEDA 15A, IEC LR6) Battery life: 20 hours
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JC wrote:

Some people waste their time trying to claim you can't fly to Hawaii on a bicycle. I suppose there are hundreds of different kinds of bicycles and perhaps that's why you just don't get it.
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That's *not* a multitester.
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[snip]

This sounds like the "evidence" for [supernatural being]. People keep saying there's plenty of evidence, than fail to produce any.
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JC wrote:

The code panels are electricians, contractors, inspectors, UL, electrical engineers who design buildings and products. What would any of them know about safe wiring?
We need the code written by the real experts, like JC.
--
bud--

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Obviously, YOU haven't read that inside front cover. You guys sure are defensive. What's the matter? All I said was that I "suspected" that this item in the code was written by some desk jockey. That's because I've read the inside front cover. I did not say for any of you to ignore this part of the code. I did not say any of you had to take my statement as fact. I simply said what *I* suspected. And you guys all got your tailfeathers ruffled as if you had been indicted or something. Geez, I thought you might be growups on here. But not a damn one of you was able to answer my question when I asked all of you defensive sorts to show me where that part of the code was NOT written by some desk jockey.
So, y'all huff and puff and blow off your steam and I'll stick with my original suspicion. You guys would shit your pants if you knew some of the people that write the various fire codes. Guess what? 90% of them are NOT fire prevention techs in any sense of the term.
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JC wrote:

Obviously I have.

If you had reasonable intelligence and read the make-up of the code panels at the front of the NEC you would find they are electricians, contractors, inspectors, UL, electrical engineers who design buildings and products. That is, people who work daily with wiring and equipment and are familiar with electrical safety.
Cite a code panel that is not primarily electricians, contractors, inspectors, UL, manufacturers, electrical engineers who design buildings and products.

I answered your question.
The code is written by electricians, contractors, inspectors, UL, electrical engineers who design buildings and products - people familiar with electrical safety.
Time to fulfill your pledge: "Could you please point out the page that tells me that the point in question was NOT inserted by some desk jockey? If you can, I promise, I'll never help anyone with house inspections."
--
bud--

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Mostly you're having problems with syntax: that junction box for that light connection will not be "covered" in the code sense as long as removing the fixture part exposes the junction box for the fixture. It's still "accessible". But the way you phrased it, without looking at your link, it sounds like a junction box with wires into it wires out of it (nothing else, no fixture) is going to be behind drywall completely. There would be no way to even know where that junction box is located once the drywall is put up. THAT is not allowed by codes! As long as you can remove a wall plate cover, a light fixture, etc, and it's removable by design, then you're all set. You can ACCESS that junction box by taking the light cover off. Now, if there is a junction box with wires going TO a light fixture junction box, and the first junction box is not accessible by taking the light's cover off, THAT would not be allowed, either.
Interestingly enough, I just discovered yesterday that I have two junction boxes illegally installed in the celing - when the attic flooring was put down, it covered two junction boxes. So you can't get at them from the attic OR the bathroom; that's NOT to code; I'll be fixing those when I redo the wiring so they're exposed from the attic side; no big deal as the flooring picks up easily after removing a few screws.
HTH,
Twayne`
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Aaron Fude wrote:

For many years I've used the Buchanan Four-Way Crimp Tool, connectors and insulating caps. The tool crimps the connector on four sides then a plastic insulating cap is snapped over the exposed metal. These connectors are very reliable and don't fall off if installed properly. Here's the best picture I could find of the tool, connectors and caps:
http://www.twacomm.com/catalog/model_C-24.htm
TDD
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Do you mean stranded wire? I never experienced problem using proper size wire nuts over the years as long as I remember. I think hiding junction box with drywall is a big no, no. Think what is the reason you installed junction box? Speakers? I use banana plugs.
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When I do a stranded to solid connections I always strip the stranded wire a little longer than the solid wire. Then I even up the insulation so the bare stranded sticks out above the bare solid and use a wirenut (I learned this from one of the guys on this group a couple years ago when I was just starting out and it has served me well). Twist the heck out of the wirenut and make sure that it is tight. Every connection I make I tug the individual wire to make sure that it doesn't pull from the wirenut. If I think it has the potential to vibrate loose I wrap a few layers of tape around the wirenut and the insulation of the 2 wires. I haven't had a problem.
Shane
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Aaron Fude wrote:

A box of wire nuts will say, "No need to pretwist." If you make good connections with solid wire, I guess you know it's important not to twist the wires clockwise first, as many do.
The trouble with stranded wire is that it tends to twist clockwise as you screw on the wire nut. You may end up with slack under the nut, and the nut may not engage all the conductors.
One solution is to make the end of the stranded wire solid by tinning it. Instead, I twist the conductors together counterclockwise before applying the nut. Screwing on the nut untwists them. As they untwist, the threads of the nut should catch them all.
I test my wire-nut connections by tugging each conductor. Sometimes I have to try again. With stranded wire, I've found wire-nut connections more reliable than crimped connections. I can make a good wire-nut connection where I can't reach with both hands.
I get by with three sizes of wire nuts. B-caps are especially nice. They have room for the spring to expand, which can mean more pressure and friction to hold large solid conductors. Friction doesn't seem to be such a concern with stranded conductors.
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Aaron Fude posted for all of us...
snipped
Anyone used these? Select your poison..
http://www.wago.us/products/325.htm
--
Tekkie Don\'t bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

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Tekkie wrote:

Yea, I have a bunch that I recovered from a job where the electricians had no clue how to use them. The things were included with the new light fixtures. I love the small push in connectors sold by Ideal for changing out ballasts in fluorescent fixtures.
http://www.idealindustries.com/products/oem/push-in /
TDD
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