threaded wire connectors

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Hi,
I've recently realized that I don't feel comfortable making wire nut connections with threaded wire. I can actually make a mean connection with solid wires that professional electricians commend me on. But when it comes to making a connection b/w the solid wires and one threaded wire (as in a recessed light) I feel that the threaded wire loosens the connection. It makes me especially nervous realizing that the junction box is getting covered by drywall.
What's the trick in making a solid connection with a threaded wire? Are there special connectors that can take stranded wire? For example, I like the spring connections on speakers, but perhaps that's not permanent enough for 120v since springs fatigue...
Many thanks for your thoughts in advance,
Aaron
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Aaron Fude wrote: ...

What's "threaded" wire??? You mean stranded, I guess?

What's to commend? Put the wires together, put on the wire nut and twist...

_NO_ junction box should be covered w/ drywall.

No real trick other than there's no such thing as threaded wire... :)
Just make the stripped length of the stranded wire about 1/3rd longer than the solid. I've not looked; I'm sure there's a blurb on it at the Ideal or other manufacturers' sites.
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 10:43:46p, dpb told us...

If you want a little more insurance, you can use solder to tin the twisted stranded wire to basically make it solid. Then combine it with the actual solid wire and you stand a better chance of achieving a better mechanical connection within the wirenut.
--
Wayne Boatwright
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Use these with the built in set screw
http://www.idealindustries.ca/products/oem/lugs/set_screw_connector.php
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Rudy wrote:

Thank you for all the responses and suggestions. Yes, I meant stranded wire.
But to everyone who no-no'd covering the junction box with drywall, what do you suggest I do about this junction box:
http://www.lightinguniverse.com/products/view.aspx?sku#19080
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with sheetrock... and it's perfectly legal, as they are considered "accessible"
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Don't worry about it. The Code requires that all junction boxes be "accessible". In this case, the junction box is "accessible" by removing the fixture can from its frame.
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wrote:

I suspect this restriction is so the connections are easy to locate if there is a fire. But, as a volunteer fireman, I can assure you that during the fighting of a fire we are not going to be looking for a junction box as one of the first things we do is shut the main power. I think this is just another "feelgood" clause inserted by some desk jockey.
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It is not a "feel good" clause, it is to ensure accessability to all connections so that problems can be located, not just for fires, but for maintenance and troubleshooting. They box may never be opened, but if it was hidden how would you even know where it was is it needed to be worked on.
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wrote:

Oh, I'd probably look at a blueprint. Failing that, I'd probably use a multi-tester and track to where a 120 suddenly shows a 240. Lots of ways. Not to be obstinate but there is no really good reason to preclude covering a box with sheetrock other than just convenience. And, that's okay. But it is just a "feel good" measure.
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wrote:

The vast majority of the time there ARE no blueprints on existing homes. You're lucky to even find a written description of wiring sometimes. A multi-tester will not tell you where a buried, inaccessible junction box is located. In fact, there is almost no way short of expensive equipment to even locate it to within a few inches of its actual location. The symptom would not be 240Vac; in a residential NA setting it would be a loss of 120Vac 99.9% of the time. If it goes to 240, there is much more wrong than an inaccessible junction box, which itself gives no indication that it even exists, let alone where it is. It's not covering a junction box with sheetrock that's a problem: It's the inaccessibility of the junction box regardless of coverings that is the problem. IF for instance the box were accessible from the other side of the wall, ceiling, etc., then that's fine. A "hot" junction box is not going to identify itself and in the hands of a poor tech may result in an inability to even realize one exists; while the house burns down that night. But if it's exposed it's easily traced and found to be hot, by any competent tech with a current license. Read the code: It gives the reasons behind it. You're welcome to your opinions but that doesn't mean others need to follow you or should depend on you. Since you participate on this group I have to assume you're involved with electrical work and thus are not credible or reliable. Your attitude makes your comments questionable.
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wrote:

The code requires junction boxes for splices to prevent fires from occurring due to faulty connections, and requires them to be accessible, so electricians can make repairs. OTOH, people who put out fires, tend to use axes, not screwdrivers to do their job
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wrote:

Bingo!
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wrote:

PS: And just to show you how brilliant that desk jockey that included that in the code is, short two 12 guage wires together in one of those blue plastic boxes and see how long it takes to obliterate it.
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JC wrote:

I'm sure the desk jockey included requirements for circuit breakers that would trip before the box got that hot.
If somebody piled confetti on a faulty connection carrying 20 amps, it could reach kindling temperature. The box is intended to let that heat dissipate.
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wrote:

Obliterate what? The blue plastic boxes are irrelevant to anything brought up in this thread. You're trying to change the subject. Do the same with an ungrounded metal box; exactly the same results.
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wrote:

Bingo what? That doesn't make your faulty opinions any more valid.
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wrote:

Not at all; you should read codes and avoid helping anyone with house inspections.
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wrote:

I have the latest code book. 2008 I believe. Could you please point out the page that tells me that the point in question was NOT inserted by some desk jockey? If you can, I promise, I'll never help anyone with house inspections.
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wrote:

Correction, I have the NEC 2005 (NFPA 70). I might have a 2008 handbook or something. But, just open up the front cover and read it for yourself. Desk jockeys, mostly desk jockey's with nothing more than OPINIONS! I mean, come on fella, can you give me a good reason why a National Electrical Code would have a disclaimer of liability for those that follow the friggin code? Geez. They sit around a big room and all of a sudden someone says something like this, "hey, you know what? My nephew, who once worked for an electricians helper, said that it sure was inconvenient trying to track down those dang junction boxes when they are hidden inside walls. Why don't you guys make that illegal?". And as they've never seen an electric wire in their lives say "sure, what the hell".
I can find a hidden junction box within minutes. With a magnet if it's metal and with a multi tester (a bit more difficult) if it's plastic. How hard do you think it is to trace from one outlet to the next, along a wall? It's not foolproof but it's very doable. And once again, if it's for safety, it's just a joke because I'll guarantee you, no fireman is going to wonder around looking for junction boxes. So we come right back to what I said originally, it's a feelgood reg for convenience ONLY!
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