Those Noisy Fan Motors

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My computer power supply fan is terribly noisy when I first turn it on. After a few minutes it quiets down and is fine till the next time I turn on the computer. Then I go in my barn and turn on an electric heater and the fan in there is just as noisy, but it too quiets down once the thing is running for a few minutes. Why do these small fan motors do that? If a bearing was bad, I dont think they would quiet down. I just learn to live with the noise as long as the motors run.
G.T.
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snipped-for-privacy@not-published.com wrote:

Hmmm, Lubrication? And heat makes things expand. Those DC fans are not terribly high quality.
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wrote:

They need oil. On the computer fan, most can be lubricated by removing the paper label right in the center. few drops of oil, and a piece of tape and it's quiet.
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Bullshit. They wear out and by the time howling has started, no lubrication will quiet them. Just replace the worn out thing if you really want to repair it.
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I concur, never attempt to lubricate one of those small computer fans, ESPECIALLY ONE INSIDE YOUR POWER SUPPLY! This could be an indicator that the fan in the power supply is about to give it up. If that is the case replace the power supply before the fan does die and the power supply tanks and takes other more important and heat sensitive components with it. But....... if the machine has always done this since new, and it is a fairly new machine, it is quite possible that you have a thermostatically controlled cooling fan in there and on boot up it does a self-test and fires up at full speed. YMMV.

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Unless you've previously replaced the power supply, chances are that putting in a $5 fan will double its value. (like putting gas in a yugo)
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"but they drive with pride......"
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wrote:

I imagine any lubricate that may cause further damage to the motherboard will void a warranty.
I replace the dang power supply. Noise is telling me the computer needs attention - same with any other fan in the box.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 19:51:56 GMT, AZ Nomad

No, it's not bullshit. But it does require the proper lubricant. Use a grease such as lubricate or wheel bearing grease with the oil and it will last for years. Oil alone lasts a couple of months.
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It is bullshit. If you put axle grease on it then it will never turn again. By the time a fan is howling, it has so much slop in the bearings that it is beyond repair. You can't fix such a fan with any lubricant. Christ. Spend the fucking two bucks and replace it! If your time is worth more than ten cents an hour then it is a bargain.
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On Tue, 30 Jan 2007 14:03:08 GMT, AZ Nomad

Sure you can and it is easy and fast. Takes 5 minutes at most and you don't have to search for a replacement part. I've got 5 computers that have been running over a year with my 'lube job' repairs on the fans and you can't hear a one of them. Best of all lubricants is the lubriplate wheel bearing grease. 2nd best is CV joint grease which looks exactly like the lubriplate.
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Small motors typically have bushings instead of bearings. Bushings wear out sooner. The axle is jigging around inside the bushing until the structure warms up a bit -- could be the axle swelling from heat, or dirty lubricant softening up, or something else a more knowledgeable person will point out later.
I fix a lot of these for clients. Clean the gray gunk off the fan blades with a can of compressed air. That usually solves the problem. If not, replace the fan. They're less than 10 bucks, unless you go for the gaudy ones with LEDs. Clean out all the rest of the dust in
If you want, you can try some light oil, but don't use much. You definitely don't want oil inside your PC. In fact, don't use oil unless the fan blows OUT of the case. I've always just replaced the fan, because I'd have to charge more for half-measures.
I won't presume to advise you about your heater. Your barn might burn down, and then I'd be sad.
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I hate to tell you this, but because you did NOT advise me about the barn heater fan, the heater burst into flames and burned the whole barn down, killing all the animals and several workers. It was horrible. It's your fault for not giving me help. You will be hearing from my lawyer, who is also my wife, and she sleeps with the judge a few times every week, so you dont have a chance to win the case.
Well, OK, I'm just giving you some shit and the latest Jerry Springer episode.... :)
Seriously, I just oiled that fan motor in the heater. It dont seem like it's worn too badly, but the oil quieted it down. There was a little fire though, (almost). I dripped some oil on the heater coil and that sure smoked for a few seconds. It works quiet now.
This heater is strange in design. The motor looks like one of those old record player motors but the coil windings are thick. Probably a #12 enamelled wire. The heater coils are connected in series with that motor. Thats an odd design. I cant understand the point to that, other than if the motor burns out the coils will not heat. Otherwise it makes little sense and that is why that wire is so thick. Thats a lot of amperage to go thru that small motor.
The computer is next. If I dont post a reply in a few days, call Bill Gates and tell him I blew up my computer. I'm sure he will care. I just hope the power supply is not riveted. It already looks like it will be a bitch to remove in this small case.
Another comment. Why the hell do they sell household oil with perfume in it? I hate that smell, and the odor will probably be on my hands for days now. Do they do this for women? They surely dont impress men with that stink !!!!!
(Disclaimer: I just dated myself when I said "record player". If you do not know what a record player is, please contact your grandparents or someone elses grandparents for a worthwhile education in musical history and entertainment.). Or else go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phonograph And just for the record (no pun intended), you could not download records on the internet. You had to go to a record store. Yeah, they really had places like that back in the stone age of the 1900's Oh, forget it, if you're that young, you dont know shit from shinola anyhow. Now, tell me what shinola is!!!!! Hint: It's NOT an Ipod (whatever that is).....
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Gerry Atrick wrote:

Might be because a smaller number of turns of heavier wire is a bit less costly to manufacture? And, a motor wound with heavier wire has a slightly lower chance of the wire breaking from vibration at a termination.
Ampere-turns is what sets what the motor does, and you can get the same amount of them with lots of turns and lower current or fewer turns and higher current.
I confess I've never run into a small heater wired like that, but now that I think about it the setup sounds like it would provide a bit of positive feedback of the element temperature, which sounds sort of bass ackwards to me.
i.e. when the element is cold, the curent through the motor is greatest, causing the motor to run a bit on the fast side, cooling the element more, and conversely when the element was hot and the current draw was less, the motor might run a bit slower, leading to less cooling and an even higher element temperature.
Hopefully someone smarter than me will give us a good reason for that setup, beyond the possibly lower manufacturing cost.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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Depending on the type of motor, it could have its speed determined not by the current, but by the frequency.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Agreed, but what does that info add to this thread Dave?
Isn't it rather unlikely that the OP will be running that heater on anything other than 60 (or maybe 50 ) Hz power?
If "Gerry Atrick" is also the OP, then by describing the motor as a "phonograph motor" style, he's probably talking about a shaded pole induction motor, which was the most common motor type used in record players once they gave up on the crank wound spring motors.
There were a few high end record "turntables" which contained hysteriesis synchronous motors, which would have been the type you brought up, but it's highly unlikely anyone would waste the money on that type of motor to drive a fan, 'eh?
Jeff
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 18:10:19 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

Yes, same person. I was using a different computer and different handle. Yes, its a shaded pole. I could not think of that phrase when I posted. But MUCH heavier duty than a turntable with that heavy winding.

Agreed, just a plain old shaded pole, coil of wire on a laminated core with bearings on each end.

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but the op stated the fan was IN his power supply. If that is the case, and if the fan is indeed failing and not a temp controlled unit, I'd recommend changing out the whole power supply rather then opening it up.

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wrote:

Having worked as an electrician for years, I am not afraid to open the power supply and can safely do it. This "baby case" is so packed that I would likely not find a power supply to fit the darn thing. I hope to get a tower soon and transfer everything to it. At that time I will likely have a new power supply so for now some oil will hopefully keep it running. But, it IS the power supply fanm NOT the CPU cooler. Thats why I was confused when someone said LED lights on the fan. But I found out they put them on some CPU fans, which seems real stupid to me because once the case is shut, who cares..... Just a waste of electricity, even if it is very minimal.
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I guess I consider my computer a hobby, perhaps an obsession, but the insides of mine are clearly visible through the clear side panel on the left side. I can barely hear mine, but I have a premium power supply with a variable speed ball bearing 120mm fan, 4- 80 mm ball- bearing case fans, & a 120mm ball-bearing side door fan, + 1 80mm ball- bearing cpu cooler fan. It runs consistently at 33-40 c cpu temperature with a relatively hot chip (AMD FX55) even during hard gaming
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