This is going to be expensive

This is a picture taken in my basement where the water line comes in.
http://imgur.com/K634A.jpg
I noticed a couple days ago the streak on the wall below the pipe and a small puddle of water below. I know this cannot be good news. I assume the pipe that runs into the house from the street has a slow leak in it, perhaps due to tree roots growing in? I recall now that the grass is always a little greener near the house where this pipe runs. Now I might know why.
How much might it cost to have the yard dug up to fix a water line? Thousands of dollars I fear. Dreading the call to the plumber.
Thanks....
Mike
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In article

I assume this is city water. If you get a water bill I'd notify those folks first and say you have a in ground leak .
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/play/snake-oil-supplements /
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On 10/21/2010 4:02 PM, Bill who putters wrote:

If it's on his side of the meter, they're not gonna care.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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Good point. The sewage side of the water bill is always higher than I think it should be. Perhaps a call might save me a few bucks.
Mike
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Not where I live. I've had a leak on their side of the meter twice, and they said if it was on my side of the meter they wouldn't touch it.
It's not their job. Their job is to fix city/county problems, period.
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On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 11:14:17 -0700, Ron wrote:
[snip]

I had a leak around my water meter once. I called the city and they said it was on my side and they wouldn't do anything.
I didn't know I had a water shufoff valve until it leaked.
--
63 days until The winter celebration (Saturday December 25, 2010
12:00:00 AM).
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wrote:

That could just be ground water getting in around the pipe. I had a similar leak around a pipe in my house along with some leaks from foundation cracks. Had US Waterproofing seal it all up. They injected something into the cracks and chiseled out and replaced the old hydraulic cement around the pipe. Suggest you get one of the waterproofing outfits to look at it. Shouldn't be more than a couple hundred for one leak like that.
--Vic
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I think it is possible to test to see if it is city water. You can watch the water meter overnight to check for water leaks.
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Mike wrote the following:

It could be if the pipe itself is leaking. Have a lot of rain lately? Maybe some UGL hydraulic cement can fix the ground leak. That has been leaking for a while. See the effluent (white powdery stain) around the hole and down the sides of the rust trail..
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Hey Bill, Your brain just farted funny.<g> I'll bet you were going for efflorescence.
Jim
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Thanks for the reply, Bill. No rain in this area for weeks. Which is why I started feeling ill when I saw the small puddle of water on the floor.
Mike
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Maybe ground water, has it rained lately. There are clamps that work to stop leaks on water pipes, so I would think how cheaply I could do it, but anyone you get out wont be motivated to save your money.
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Thanks for the reply. It hasn't rained in Georgia in weeks unfortunately, so I'm pretty sure this water is coming from the pipe.
Mike
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Firstly determine if it is City water. You can do this with a chlorine test kit. If it is not then go ahead and seal it up. If it is I would call the plumber. It could be a leak a lot further out then you are seeing. The water sometimes will follow the path of the pipe.
-Dave
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wrote:

Might be tens of thousands of dollars, but so what. You're loaded. You got lots of money. Just call the plumber, and hand him your wallet and credit cards.
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On Oct 22, 8:01am, snipped-for-privacy@evergreen.com wrote:

I agree with suggestion to figure otu what it is first. A clorine test and checking the meter. Unfortunately not all meters records very slow flows. But it's a place to start. You checked the joint from the incoming pipe to the copper and made sure that is dry? As another poster mentioned, female pvc/cpvc develops leaks over time. It's best to always have the metal half of such a combination be the female side. When I have no choice I use sch 80 female fittings, they are much stronger.
You didn't mention where you are or how far down the pipe is. If your yard has to be dug up the only thing I know that can save you money it to do the digging yourself.
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Thanks for the post, James. It has been very dry here in metro Atlanta for the past couple months, so I'm almost certain it's from the pipe.
The pipe is about 3' underground, which would make digging it myself a possibility. However as Dave mentioned, the leak could be well away from the house. Perhaps I'll dig next to the house to see what I find. Might save some money that way.
Mike
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Hi Bob. It IS is plastic elbow pipe coming out of the wall, then copper. I'd have to guess it was built that way (in about 1978).
Perhaps I'll get a shovel and start digging to see what I can find. Someone else commented, though, that the leak might be well away from the house and the leaking water might simply follow the pipe.
Mike
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The pressure in my house has been low for many years. Galvanized pipe installed back when was closing up. I had a local contractor do a replacement for $800.00, I know this was a good price, however I am also certain it depends on your location and how busy local plumbers are. He had his own little machine to dig the trench My run was approx. 40 feet and 4-6 feet down. Check in your area, talk to local plumbing supply shops for references..etc

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