This electric range install doesnt seem right???

I found why my newly installed range shorted out when I moved the power cord. 2 very cheap components.
1. - the the connectors on the stove are held in place by a plastic clip. very flimsy.
2.- the clamp the holds the cord is not properly fastened to the frame of the stove. the clamp is tight on the wire but the clamp only has two metal wings that keep it from falling out of the stove frame, it is not held securly. You can wiggle the wires and clamp putting pressure on the cheap plastic clamp holding the cord connectors.
One of the plastic catches broke and the wire moved and touched the metal cover causing a short. This had tripped the breaker.
I taped it up and have been using the stove until the repair guy comes out saturday. I will remove all of my modifications and leave it broken like I found it and let them make it right.
My question is, I dont think the cord clamp should be loose where it connects to the frame and I intend on telling the service guy this. you should be able to move the power around and the clamp should stay stationary so the movement does not stress the connections.
Am I correct??
Thanks
Steve
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The strain relief for your 50A cord should be all metal and should be secured tightly to the junction box and you should be able to yank on the electrical cord with some amount of force and not be able to pull out the cord - hence "strain relief". By any chance if its a Frigidaire? My new electrical range was missing the strain relieve and the factory didn't even know what I was talking about and won't supply me with a replacement. They directed me to Sears parts and have me pay for it!! I'm very hesitant to buy anything from Electrolux such as Fridgidaire, Tappan, Poulan chainsaws, etc. - all had problems.
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You are correct that the thing is cheaply made,however the clamp is intended to prevent to cord from pulling out, which it does. Personally, I hate those clamps and routinely replace them with flat service connectors which work much better and you don't need four hands to install them. But the range and all of its cheap hardware do have a U.L. stamp of approval, so what do you do!!!

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the range is a GE
We will see what the service guy does??
Thanks
Steve
On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 16:57:26 -0500, "RBM" <rmottola1(remove

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Steve,

I'm not sure what you are describing with this one. Usually the wires connect to a "bakelite" (basically plastic) terminal block. The wires have ring terminals that get screwed down to the terminal block. The block usually has tabs that stick up between each terminal to prevent wires from touching each other. The terminal block is often just hanging from a metal tab or something and can frequently move around fairly easy.

That's a standard strain relief on most stoves and clothes dryers. I've never been real crazy about them myself, but that seems to be the norm. The cable can move side to side slightly, but the "wings" prevent it from being pulled out.
I would personally like to see a stronger strain relief and a more rugged terminal block, but I guess they'll use the cheapest item that gets the job done. Stoves and Clothes dryers usually don't get moved much anyway.
Anthony
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