Thinking About Replacing Tires At Home

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Never heard of them. Are they a big tire store chain? Sell and install tires?

Agree with you. Id never do it myself. Never do exhaust work myself again either. Ha!
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There are a lot of repairs the average person can do by themselves and save a lot of money, but mounting tires sure isn't one of them. Plus, even if you mount them, which is a bitch, you can't spin balance them. If you buy them online, Tirerack has a list of installers throughout the US that they will drop ship them to and they will install them for a reasonable fee.
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Chet is right-on-the-money!
What are you gonna do if you screw-up your tires when installing them?
Please pay a tire company to install your tires.... they have insurance, and proper equipment. If you screw-up your new tires, you have to eat it.
Regards, Dave
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ya gotta be kidding us, right?
(please see last paragraph for my true comment... otherwise, please read full post for tire removal/installation)
The tuff-est part of removing a tire is whats called "breaking the bead"... that's where the tire meets the rim/wheel. With the wheel off of the car,and laying down flat on its side, downward force has to be pressed on the tire near the rim (bead). There are TWO beads per tire, inboard and outboard. I give you my best wishes! Do you see where I'm going with this? NO? --- okay
After that you'll need help. Insert a prybar between the rim and tire and pull the tire over the rim. A SECOND prybar will be needed to do the same. One person holds the first prybar as the second person whales on the first prybar with a big ole' hammer and 'works' it all the way around the rim. Your gonna have to do this 8 times. (4wheels X 2 beads=8) Do you see where I'm going with this? NO?-- okay...
You should replace the valve stems because they're cheap insurance for leakage. There's a special tool that 'threads' onto the valve stem that pulls the old stem out, and installs it the same way. It cost about 20-25 bucks. If you don't have one of these special tools, you can cut the old stem off with a razor/knife from inside of the rim area. Just cut the 'fat' part of the old stem on the inside of the rim as close as possible. But, re-installing the new stem will be the trick... because your going to have to use a pair of pliers, or something to pull the new stem through the hole WITHOUT damaging the new stem. Cutting it will mean certain air pressure loss, and soon, tire failure. Do you see where I'm going with this? NO? -- okay
NOW is the time you've been waiting for... installing the new tires. I'm not sure of your vehicles age, but sometimes cleaning the rim where the bead of the tire meets the rim is good insurance too... use a stiff wire brush. Clean it all the way around (4 rims x 2beads = 8) There is also a chemical called "bead sealer" that will help insure the bond between tire and rim.
Installation is about the same as removal. Two people, two pry-bars, big hammer... BUT WAIT!... you're going to need some rubber lubricate... liquid soap will work just fine. Spread it all around the new tires bead. There's usually a small dot on the outside of the tire... sometimes red, yellow or white. Align that 'dot' with the the valve stem. Good luck and my best wishes! Do you see where I'm going with this? NO? -- okay
Assuming you now have your new tires installed on the rims, without totally destroying them, how are you going to inflate them? I have seen rock-crawlers and artic guys inflate tires by spraying starter-fluid inbetween the bead and rim, and then "flicking-there-Bic" --BOOM!-- (I didn't say this .... Don't try this at home kids, but a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do, I guess). Do you see where I'm going with this? NO? --- okay
Then you have to balance the wheel assembly. Again my best wishes. There IS a special tool that rest on a pendulum, with a bubble gauge much like a carpenters' level. You place your wheel assembly on-top of the balancer, and then 'tack' wheel weight onto the side that the 'air bubble' is on... it cost a few hundred (US) dollars and is VERY primitive. Do you se where I'm going with this? NO? -- okay
With all of the modern technology present today... paying an automotive technician fifty- bucks to mount and balance your wheels is very, very cheap!
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Heh. I just replaced a tire on a trailer, my first experience. Never again...
[I had little choice, since the wheel bolts were rust-frozen _solid_ and I couldn't get the wheel off. The trailer was out in the boonies.]

Wish I had thought of that. Fortunately, I didn't wreck the tire.

This works and is relatively easy: Take a chunk of rope, and wrap it a turn or two around the circumference of the tire and tie it off. Then, using a heavy screwdriver or a chunk of wood, do a "spanish windlass" to tighten the loop. This expands the tire against the bead.
It helps to have something that will dump air into the tire _fast_. Ie: an inflater tank.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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i use a small butane torch. heat up the bolts and wrench off with ease. and if they don't, turn up the heat and melt em off....
-a|ex
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big
And if the lug bolts are that rusty, and it was sitting long enough for tire to dry-rot, what made you think there was any grease left in wheel bearing? Unless it was real old style where you can pull off dust cap and grease with wheel in place, and you did grease it, you were lucky wheel didn't seize up and fail catastropically at highway speed when you pulled it out of there.
Yet another reason I give trailers as wide a berth as possible on the road.
aem sends...
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We tried a torch. And a air-powered wrench (but it didn't have enough pressure to really kick the bolt heads). You can't melt a bolt with a torch like that.
Besides, shearing the heads off those bolts would have made the problem worse. [These were hex bolts, not wheel nuts. Would have left me with shorn off bolt inside the wheel hub. Ugh.]

Only had a couple of Km to go, trailer very light, we went slow, had a chase car watching for things falling off, and the wheels clearly had grease in 'em. Yes, it did have dust caps, but didn't bother visually checking.
Even if the wheel had seized, nothing much would have happened. Very light trailer (a smallish mobile sign), going very slow.

Me too.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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DaddyMonkey wrote:

Third most famous "Last Words of a Redneck" (right behind "Hey guys, watch this!" and "Baby, grab my Duct Tape")...
"Shit yeah, this'll work..."
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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wrote:

The third most famous is " hold my beer would ye"
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Have you ever changed a bicycle or motorcycle tire by hand? If you don't mind hard, frustrating work and busting a few knuckles, it is possible to remove & mount a car tire using only a set of tire irons and something to hold the rim, but I can't imagine why anyone would want to. And you would still need to have the wheels balanced afterwards, though you could use soemthing like "EQUALS" instead of conventional wheel weights. For the $10 or whatever a tire dealer charges for mounting & balancing, it's really not worth doing it yourself, unless you have access to the same equipment a tire shop has. I wouldn't be so sure you could get a better price online, either, especially after shipping & handling is added.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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This is Turtle.
You just picked a money saver ideal that calls for a lot of work and very little savings. You would have to have a lot of tire trouble to justify doing it yourself. Also if you do it yourself you will not spin balance your tires and that alone will get you to change a bunch of tires with low mileage on them. My local tire place competes with any internet tire places as most do. They charge $5.00 to pull tire and break it down and fix leaks, $7.50 to put on any new or old tires and spin balance it , and $235.00 put on 4 Cooper Truck tires R-225-16" / 6 ply , spin balanced and put on. Car tires are cheaper with 4 Cooper R-185-14" 4 ply , spin balanced and put on for $145.00.
To get the quality of the spin balancing and machine installation with no rips in the tires will get you for about $2,000.00.
TURTLE
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