They finally found proof texting bans - does it make a difference

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On 1/20/2016 10:22 AM, Muggles wrote:

I don't think so. The distraction is in your brain, not in how fast you can text. While listening to the radio can be distracting, you don't have to look at it to do it. If they aren't watching the road, that's just an accident waiting to happen.
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You might not see some other clueless twerp doing something wrong, but it doesn't stop you driving correctly yourself. You look ahead and see you don't have to do anything for 5 seconds, so you can look at your phone for a bit.
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Muggles wrote:

Driving is total attention business needing all 5 senses. Our store is next door to Starbuck coffee shop. Seeing thru the windows in the shop, all people sitting there is texting burying their face into the smart phones. After finishing coffee, comes out into their parked cars, again texting with car's engine running. What in the world do they have so much to text? Nowadays it is rare sight people doing eyeball conversations. Most of texting is gossips, garbage chit chats, non-productive junks. It is as bad as drug addictions.
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On 1/20/2016 11:39 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

It is addictive, or maybe it just becomes a habit that is just normal for people in this digital age. My kids all text and do Facebook, so I text and check up on their FB's, too, even though I don't really post to FB much at all. I think that's just what they grew up into using as the technology became available - they embraced it.
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On 1/20/2016 12:38 PM, Muggles wrote:

There's nothing wrong with embracing technology, understanding it and being able to use it. Like others have mentioned though, driving requires the attention of the driver.
I don't believe it's normal to be so attached to a device.
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SeaNymph wrote:

Locally there was an incident a teenage boy was playing with smart phone in bed and fell asleep in the night, some how the phone started burning under blanket causing injury to the boy. Anyone who says using handhelp device while driving is safe is an idiot. Sooner or later distracted driving will kill self or some one or if lucky will come out alive from accident caused by distraction. I encourage and give my kids cars with manual shift which requires more attention. I always drive using paddle shift on my vehicle. Is there such thing as forever lucky? Monkeys do fall from trees.... Some parts of Canada fine for distracted driving is 700.00 and they still do. It's an addiction. My route to downtown from home is via freeway or ring road. I see guys/gals reading, doing make ups, drinking coffee/eating, yakking/texting on cell phone, etc. They are menace on the road.
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On 1/20/2016 1:32 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I've seen similar things going on when people were driving. It's crazy when they're going 70mph on the interstate and trying to put on mascara! I don't get why people need to use a cell phone by hand, either, when a hands free device and wi-fi technology allows people to still function and keep both hands on the steering wheel.
I don't think people are going to stop using cell phones while driving, either, so at least they could be required to use the safest options out there. There are constant distractions aside from cell phone use, so we're already used to being distracted. Having a conversation with a passenger, or even listening to a radio is equally distracting as using a cell phone to carry on a conversation.
IF we're going to debate about how cell phone use is dangerously distracting, why aren't we making a fuss about the technology being put in new cars where our phones can be synced with the radios so people can use hands free voice calls more safely? Isn't that distracting, too, but evidently not enough to warrant banning it's implementation into new vehicles.
People are going to do stupid things when they drive, and get distracted by something eventually. I don't know if the solutions is to totally ban the usage of any phone while driving regardless of the technology, or adapt to the technology as it makes cars safer to drive.
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the solution are autonomous vehicles, at which point people can do whatever the hell they want while the car does the driving, and far safer than any human can do.
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On 1/20/2016 2:26 PM, nospam wrote:

While autonomous vehicles may be practical in the future, it'll be quite a few years before that technology is advanced enough for practical implementation. Maybe it'll be something we can actually practically use within the next 20 or 30 years.
Until that happens, though, the best technology that's out there is only installed on new vehicles, and not everyone can actually buy those cars. I don't have any research numbers, but I'd guess a very small percentage of people can actually afford to even buy vehicles with the current smart technology.
I'd also want to know how those people involved in developing the technology have addressed the possibility of maliciously hacking vehicles, and all the issues involved when software is in charge of controlling a 2000 pound rolling weapon?
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it's *already* starting to appear in limited forms and within 5-10 years, autonomous vehicles will be more than a curiosity.
highway driving is likely to be first, which is comparatively much easier than city traffic. the person can then take over at the destination exit and finish the trip.

it'll be standard, just like abs brakes, airbags, etc. are now.

nothing is perfect. what matters is that the collision, injury and fatality rate is lower than it is now, which isn't all that hard to do.
with drunk driving, driving too fast for conditions, unsafe vehicles (bald tires, worn out brakes, etc.), distracted driving and human error completely eliminated, even with an occasional hacker, you're still *way* ahead.
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On 1/20/2016 4:12 PM, nospam wrote:

I'm guessing longer than that before they are anything but in the testing phase, but who knows.... It could happen sooner.

Dumb blond says to cop: "BUT officer! it's an autonomous car - it drives itself! Why did it crash when I got off the highway??"

I wonder if it'll be affordable?

If the purpose of an autonomous car isn't to eliminate collisions and injuries, is it going to be worth the expense just to change the stats a little?

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as i said, it's already happening.
many vehicles have adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and blind spot assist. ford had auto-park several years ago.
last year, an autonomous mercedes drove itself to las vegas: <http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/60-minutes-test-rides-mercedes-benz-self- driving-car/>
autonomous trucks exist: <https://www.daimler.com/innovation/autonomous-driving/freightliner-insp iration-truck.html>
several car makers have announced autonomous functionality as soon as the 2017 model year.

there are *many* advantages to autonomous vehicles, including a *dramatic* reduction of collisions, injuries and fatalities, reducing traffic and being able to make trips otherwise not possible.
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On 1/21/2016 2:46 PM, nospam wrote:

Used to be that only high end cars had stuff like that, but it is filtering down to the more basic models now too. Makes driving less tiresome and safer.
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On 1/21/2016 1:46 PM, nospam wrote:

I've seen a lot of testing going on with such things, but I still thinks it's a decade or more away from fully autonomous cars being the norm on the roads.

I'm somewhat skeptical as the viability and effectiveness, at least any time soon.
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it obviously won't change completely overnight, nor does it have to be fully autonomous either.
even if only part of a trip is automated, that's still a win.

why?
it only needs to be better than human drivers, which unfortunately, is not all that difficult.
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On 1/21/2016 7:10 PM, nospam wrote:

Quite often software fails, gets hacked, or simply doesn't work like it's supposed to work.
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not as often as humans fail.
nothing is perfect, but as long as it does better, it's a win, and since drunk driving, texting, falling asleep, etc., will no longer happen, that's rather easy to do.
keep in mind that autonomous vehicles will have radar, lidar and video scanning 360 degrees non-stop, which means it will be able to see things humans could never see, particularly at night and also in fog.
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On 1/21/2016 8:02 PM, nospam wrote:

I guess I just don't trust the technology to not be hackable.
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you do realize that airplanes, some of which carry 300+ passengers, fly almost entirely on autopilot, right?
nothing is perfectly safe.
cars today can be hacked, just in a different way. someone could sabotage it or maybe just shoot at cars, such as the instance that happened just recently: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_freeway_shootings
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On 1/21/2016 8:49 PM, Muggles wrote:

Bought a new car a couple of months ago. I'm still a bit skeptical but less than I was. My car can easily follow another at highway speeds and adjust speed and even come to a stop with me just steering. Even helps with that with lane departure.
I've posted a link before to Genesis driverless caravan.
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