They did it again!

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Look for information about the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, a division of the Department of the Treasury.
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Everett M. Greene wrote:

The Bureau of Printing & Engraving prints Federal Reserve Notes - and charges the Fed for the product (some $500 million in 2006). The Bureau of Printing & Engraving also prints passports, military identification cards, revenue stamps, and other stuff. The BPE began printing postage stamps in July 1894 but on June 13, 2006, the BPE printed its last postage stamp.
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Are these the new presidential series coins? You are not supposed to spend them but collect them. Thus the government will make maybe 10 billion dollars. My wife said, after sucking us in on the state quarter, she's not collecting these ;)
Frank
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Per Harry K:

When I saw them on TV, I though "geeze, they seem to be another quarter-look alike".
My guess is that it's not so much stupidity as how our government makes many if not most decisions: they listen to the people with money, i.e. businesses - who, I'm guessing, wouldn't want to have to deal with another coin size.
I agree with you: it's doomed by virtue of it's size.
--
PeteCresswell

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Who cares? I can't remember the last time I used cash for anything. I'm not even sure I have ANY cash in my wallet. Do people really still use cash for anything anymore? I doubt I've handled cash in over a year. Where are you going and what are you buying for which you need cash? After all, credit cards are free, they give you cash back, and you can pay your balance in full once a month right online. Why on earth would anyone NOT use them for everything?
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They don't take plastic at yard sales, or lotsa other places normal people shop. And normal people get irritated as hell when somebody ahead of them in line uses plastic for a 2 dollar purchase, at a retailer that doesn't have one of those whiz-bang customer operated terminals. There will always be a need for cash.
aem sends....
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Hmm, I actually DO take plastic at my yard sales, since I am a self- employed merchant, but I guess most people don't. However, since I rarely shop for anything at all, either new or used, I can't say I visit garage sales all that much. I guess since I'm not much of a "consumer" I must not be normal. And, as far as "normal" goes, I can't say that there are any places I shop without the "whiz-bang" terminals. I rarely make offline purchases anywhere except the grocery store, WalMart, restaurants, the post office, and gas stations, and they all have the "whiz-bang" stuff, and it's MUCH faster to swipe a $2 purchase than to deal with bills and coins. That way, I don't irritate you "normal" people. I live in the boonies, not a big city, and I rarely see anyone else use money either. II don't know what you're talking about when you say there's a need for cash. Frankly, since I get at least $700/year in cash back from my credit card issuer, I can't afford NOT to use cards for everything. As always, however, YMMV.
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Per snipped-for-privacy@searchmachine.com:

I guess I'm out of touch bc this is the first time I've heard of that.
What issuer?
--
PeteCresswell

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(PeteCresswell) wrote:

I think Discover was the one that pioneered the concept but others have picked it up. I saw an ad for Chase the other day which said you could have airline miles, points, or cash back -- your choice.
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I have a Chase, Discover, and Bank of America, and they all do that. I only use the BoA, however, because it has the highest percentage with extra "points" on what I buy most. I thought everyone's cards did this.
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On the general subject of money, coins, and the like, I found the following at: http://gocomics.typepad.com/the_sandbox /
Author:MAJOR Michael Irwin ===========================Its the little things that get our attention - in this case, five cents.
At overseas locations, the base economy is penny-less. AAFES (Army and Air Force Exchange Service) does not use pennies; all prices our rounded to the nearest nickel. The cost of shipping pennies is more than the value of the pennies themselves.
Here in Iraq they take it further; no coins at all. But they dont round to the nearest dollar. Instead, they issue "pogs". These mini-gift-certificates are used in place of coins. On one side is the AAFES logo and some suitably patriotic image, and on the other a 5 10 or 25 notation. AAFES makes it clear that "pogs" are cash value as depicted, and can be redeemed at any AAFES world wide for the full value. And really, I dont want carry a bunch of loose change in a combat environment. This program makes sense.
So I have not seen a real coin in several months.
While shopping at the local BX to get something or other I handed the cashier some dollar bills, and put my hand out, expecting a few pogs. An odd weight settled in my hand. I looked down and Lo, there in my hand was a nickel! My two colleagues and I stopped talking and all gazed in wonder at the coin. It was as if there was an angelic chorus in the background, and the image of Jefferson seemed to glow. It was a real nickel. A tangible piece of home! A no-kidding bit of America!! It was a remarkable moment...
To us, but not to the cashier. She looked at the slack-jawed idiot aircrew standing in front of her, staring, then looked at the coin in my hand for a moment, then looked at the three dummies again.
Hey, its a nickel. Get over it! NEXT!
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On 19 Feb 2007 10:36:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@searchmachine.com wrote:

I guess you don't buy candy bars from kids who go door to door.
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I'm so rural I can't see my neighbors, so we've never had ANYONE selling anything door to door. We've never had a trick or treater in 25 years. Again, maybe some people have a need for cash, but not where I live.
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snipped-for-privacy@searchmachine.com wrote:

Taking plastic as a merchant, will cost you an additional 2%, minimum. It's utterly foolish to take plastic, at a garage sale no less.
You know, for someone that claims to rarely shop for anything at all, new or used. And, not much of a consumer. You sure do get a lot "cash back". You have to spend close to $70K a year in order to get $700 back.
I smell a BSer, big time. LOL, thanks for catching yourself up in lies.
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snipped-for-privacy@bogged.down says...

Actually, he's wise to accept plastic (evidently, he already knows that). As a merchant, you wind up selling a lot more stuff if you accept plastic - certainly more than enough to make up the fee. Do you really think that retailers would almost universally accept plastic if there wasn't an economic benefit to it?

That would be true if the cash back was only 1%. Most issuers are now paying at least 2% and many go as high as 5% *after* the promotional period ends, and even higher for certain purchases/merchants. For example, I got 20% on my Citgo gasoline purchases for the first 90 days after I got their card last year. That was $150 just on gas (the fact that they were the cheapest gas in town was icing on the cake). Add another $10,000 worth of purchases at 5% on another card and that adds up to $650 for <$10,000 in purchases. As it was, I bought a couple of major appliances last year, so I don't anticipate quite as much this year. Nevertheless, $700 is not hard to do.

I smell someone who is maybe p*ssed because he didn't get the same deal.
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Well, when you're selling antiques furniture at more than $100 a piece, you have much better sales if you take plastic.

??? If you only get 1% back, yes, but not if you're getting a sliding percentage based on buying habits. Also, if you buy EVERYTHING on plastic, then the points add up quickly. I only spend about 30k on plastic a year, and a huge amount of that is the "extra points" purchases I use for my business, which get about 5%. It's not a "business" card, it's just my consumer card. Everyone can do this. What's the big deal?
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Hayes wrote:

Browsing one night I found a used truck I liked.
Told the salesman I'd have to go home for a check.
Instead, he accepted my American Express card for $11,400.
Evidently he computed that the certain discounted Amex price was worth more than the possibility of me returning with a check.
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Word! When I signed up years ago as an AMEX merchant I opted for a flat rate of $5/month instead of a percentage plus fees. There are some months when I get no AMEX sales at all, but overall I pay less than 1 percent on AMEX sales. If your car salesmen opted for the flat rate it cost him $5 to make an instant $11,400, and that's assuming no other AMEX sales all month! That's why merchants accept cards - they increase sales. Also, they don't bounce!
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wrote:

have tried to use one of my rebate cards at a car dealer after I negotiated a price they wanted to renegotiate the deal.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

It's not uncommon for a dealer to want to renegotiate even if you offer to pay cash. There's profit in financing.
But I think HeyBub's point was that a dealer knows that the odds of someone returning with a check in that kind of scenario are not high. Better to sell the car for $11,400 on the spot rather than risk not selling it at all.
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