thermostat wire

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Lithium batteries last ~3 times longer.

Some Vision Pro comes with RTA(return air) sensor. Drill one hole into return air plenum to mount it. One wire from it to thermostat to use this fall back freeze prevention feature.
Being a Honeywell retiree, I am always for Honeywell 'stats.
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On 09/10/2013 12:10 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

I've had good luck with them myself. Only complaint being the latest one I purchased - which appeared to be the updated version of the same on that I had in my last house - only runs off batteries, the directions tell you not to connect the 24VAC wire from the furnace controller. Now it's been in use for several months now with no apparent issues and no battery changes, but just on principle I would prefer that the batteries be for backup only as they were on my old thermostat. Also reprogramming after a battery change is a pain in the keister (it's a 5/2 programmable deal, part of the reason I got it. The other being that it has an "Auto" mode for the few times a year that you may need to switch from heating to cooling or vice versa in the same day.)
All in all, if I'd known that it didn't take the 24VAC input, I'd have purchased a different model. (ordered it online as it was $20-something vs. $60-something locally.)
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Hi, If you must, there maybe a unused battery compartment in that 'stat. Jury rig to put in rechargeable batteries in there and build a small charger/regulator on a breadboard and hang it behind 'stat and drive it with 24V AC coming from the furnace. I'll be 73 next month. My brain still works pretty good but little slow. Always looking for some thing to do or I still play my euphonium driving family crazy(just better half now), LOL! I never used 5-2 programmable one.
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On 09/10/2013 12:47 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

That would actually be a great idea, if I didn't have 20 more important projects to do as well. That's how I would ideally like to have the thing work, have the power actually charge up rechargeable cells which kick in only when AC power goes out for a true zero-maintenance (until the cells actually die 10 years or so down the road) system.
I'm assuming you could just maintain a constant voltage on the cells, that way you could piggyback right on the terminals of the cells and make a crappy little power supply to keep them trickle charged. It wouldn't actually power them up if they were run down, or at least not quickly, but it'd be cheap 'n' sleazy.
nate
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On Tuesday, September 10, 2013 1:19:21 PM UTC-4, Nate Nagel wrote:

Putting the new thermostat you don't like up on Ebay and getting one that runs off system power sounds like a much easier and simpler idea.
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Nate Nagel wr

Hi, There are all kinda ASIC for the purpose, it is not that hard to do. I have two weather stations, one at home(Davis, which is good stuff), one out at cabin El Cheapo Chinese knock off with 2 AA cells. I converted this one to rechargeable Ni-Cads and used a piece of solar cell from garden light to charge them. It is going into 3rd winter now since, no trouble at all. Davis one is on solar charger as it came which is connected to NOAA grid on the 'net.
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On 9/10/2013 11:19 AM, Nate Nagel wrote:

The battery may be connected to the thermostat wires through the thermostat circuitry (not isolated by relay). Charging off of the 24VAC may not be as easy as it sounds.
There used to be thermostats with rechargeable batteries that charged with the voltage across the open stat contacts.
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On 9/9/2013 9:14 PM, bob wrote:

Regular heat pump systems. The thermostat cable installed for a heat pump may actually have 9 wires in the sheath. Me and GB always ran a cable containing more wires than immediately needed. There are adapters available for multiplexing a few thermostat wires into more connections for updated thermostats. The cost of the adapters is cheaper than the cost of labor needed to run a new cable. ^_^
TDD
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If me, I'd go for the 8 wire and buy more thermostats from Braeburn. They were as easy to work with as if they were the corner hardware store!
Can you use the existing wire to pull the new wire? I couldn't some idiot stapled the old wire to the studs!
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On 09/10/2013 10:55 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

Well, that's what you're supposed to do in new construction; in retrofit work you are allowed to not staple it if you aren't opening up the wall... but if you have access to the underside of the floor from the basement usually you can just drill a hole through the plate, or use the old one, and drop the wire from the hole behind the thermostat with only a little fiddling around.
Once I got very very lucky and a sharp jerk on a piece of Romex was able to pop the staples out of the studs enough that I could pull it out and a new piece in behind it (was replacing an ancient 14/2 with a new 14/2WG and replacing one run in an existing wall was all that was required to properly ground a whole mess of work.) Didn't hurt that the new Romex was physically smaller than the old cloth covered stuff; that won't be true when replacing a 3-conductor thermostat wire with a 5 or 8-conductor one.
nate
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