Thermostat

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Hi, I own a Honeywell Vision Pro thermostat. This thermostat has a built in timer with date. With the change in daylight savings time this year. Spring being moved up a couple of weeks & fall is being pushed back a couple of weeks. How can I program it for the new format the government implemented? Thank you Steven
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According to the Bush administration global warming does not exist, so why would such a change be necessary?
<sorry, I don't know how to re-program your thermostat>
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Steven wrote:

Most likely you can't. Contact Honeywell (or whoever installed it for you) to find out for sure.
Chris
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I think this would need a firmware upgrade.

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It looks as though daylight savings time will be longer, but that ceratinly will not affect when Spring and Fall will be. The seasons are based on the orbit of Earth around the Sun.
You may have to contact the company to see how to deal with the change in daylight savings time. Hopefully someone here will know how to re- program the unit to accept the new dates. Good Luck.
-Felder
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As others have pointed out, you probably can't.
But I'm wondering -- what difference does it make? Both transitions occur at a time of year when you don't need to use your furnace *or* your air conditioner a whole lot. Is one hour plus or minus on your setback times really going to make that much difference in your comfort, for the few weeks that it will be out of sync?
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Steven wrote:

Don't think it is possible unless there is a way of updating with new firmware(if it is available) and way of doing it.
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It probably had eprom or plain rom chip in which case it cant be reprogrammed, and who ever said its spring or fall and you shouldn't be using furnace much, I guess it would depend on his location, norther minnisotta I bet he will still be using it a lot. Im still wondering if I will be able to get an update to my old computer bios's for new dates for automatic savings time updates. Or if its handled by windows itself.

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Certainly it depends on location. You're right that in early April, if he lives in northern Minnesota, he'd still be using the furnace a lot. But if he lives in southern Georgia, he wouldn't be using it at all.
Point is that when the DST transitions occur, the furnace is not going to be used enough that one hour difference on the timing of the setback periods is really going to matter much for most people.
To the OP -- if that's not acceptable to you, put your old t-stat on eBay. I'll buy it.

Most recent versions of Windows allow you the option of synchronizing your PC's clock to an internet time server. Do that, and the DST transitions will be handled for you automagically.
For example, in XP, double-click on the time in the lower right hand corner. "Date and Time Properties" box appears. Click the "Internet Time" tab, then check the box next to "Automatically synchronize with an internet time server". Then click OK.
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09 Feb 2007 14:48:26 GMT, Doug Miller wrote:

Sorry, no "automagic" DST transitions from the time servers. Internet time servers running the NTP protocol (the protocol used by that "Internet Time" tab) use UTC, leaving local translations for time zone and DST up to the local client system. As you're running Windows, you'll find these translations in your Control Panel, under "Date/Time" (aka, "Date and Time").
--
Seth Goodman

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--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Just set the damn thing to change temperatures at whatever time you want them to change. What difference does it make if the thermostat thinks that's 7 AM or 6 AM?

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really 6AM, the timing of the setback periods will be off by an hour. The OP wants to avoid having to reprogram his thermostat twice each spring, and twice each fall, to account for the thermostat not making the DST transition at the same time all of his clocks do.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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says...

The user should disable the automatic DST update setting on the t'stat so they only have to manually adjust once in the spring and once in the fall.
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It's simpler still to just ignore it for the few weeks that the thermostat is out of sync with the new DST transitions.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Wrong.
Let's suppose someone has their heat pre-programmed to 70 deg in the evening, 65 overnight, and 70 again by the time they get out of bed, say at 7:00 AM. On March 11, they forward their clock so that when it reads 7:00 AM, the thermostat still thinks it's only 6:00 AM, and the temperature is colder than 70 deg, which defeats the whole purpose of having a digital programmable thermostat with discrete time/temperature pre-programmed settings.
The whole point of having a clock on a digital programmable thermostat is to take advantage of setting the temperature to different values at specific times of the day.
It takes 30 seconds to disable the auto DST adjustment feature, and perhaps 10 seconds, maximum, to manually adjust the time after that, two times per year.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

Nobody should ever have to reprogram the thermostat! At worse, just turn off automatic DST adjustment entirely and manually adjust the clock on the thermostat at the same time as resetting all the other clocks in the house. Changing the clock time by an hour is generally easier than changing thermostat programming, and needs to be done at most twice a year.
Now, the change in DST dates will break the existing automatic DST compensation, and it would be nice if there was a firmware update to fix that, but that's not likely for a cheap device like a programmable thermostat. And how important is the feature, really?
    Dave
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I was going to say that, but I guess he wants the house to get hotter at the last minute, just before he gets up for work, and unless one is a farmer, work seems to be dependant on the clock, not the sun.
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wrote:

I guess I just don't see why it's better to jump through hoops the change the thermostat's DST adjustment than to jump through nearly identical hoops to change the time the furnace comes on in the morning.
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