The Robbers Got Extra Lead With Their Dominoes Pizza

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SteveB wrote:

Yeah, Marvin had to do things "his way." In the police/sheriff's academy, they tell you (if common sense can't figure it out), that cops should wear clip-on neckties (for reasons that are obvious to you an me).
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Conspiracy and robbery, maybe reckless driving and moving violations, any weapons offenses if found in possession of any, receiving stolen property.
But the getaway car driver did not commit homicide of his criminal partners - the cops did, maybe justifiably.

- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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And Melanie Furder is a girl I used to boink in high school.......
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On Sun, 30 Dec 2007 23:47:17 GMT, "Dr. Hardcrab"

Well who hasn't boinked Melanie Furder?
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wrote

...and everyone knew her as 'Nancy'......
;-]
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Don Klipstein wrote:

There is a very old truism arising out of English common law. The man that starts the horse drove the wagon. Starting in that context means to apply a rod cane or whip to the subject. A very common order in the British sailing navy was "Start that man." The petty officer so addressed would apply a knotted rope end or cane to the offending sailor.
A similar principal applies to civil law in the US. The catch phrase is when you commit a tort you are along for the ride. It means that you can be held answerable at law for the unforeseen but foreseeable consequences of a negligent act. In criminal law the principle is expressed as "intent follows the bullet." No matter were the bullet comes to rest the shooter is responsible for its damage. Felony Murder just takes it back one step. Death during an armed robbery is a foreseeable result of starting out to commit one. Anyone who undertakes an armed robbery is guilty of some degree of criminal homicide in any death that arises out of that undertaking of that crime. -- Tom Horne
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In PA, if a robber drops a safe on someone's head while crawling through a ceiling, it's felony murder.
But if a robber points a gun at the intended victim and pulls the trigger and the victim dies, it's something higher than felony murder - it's second degree murder, automatic life without parole.
And if a robber shoots up an armored car driver as Plan A without giving the driver a chance to live by complying with a carjacking, then it is higher still - obviously premeditated, first degree murder. Two sentences are available: Life without parole, and death row.
And if a cop or a getaway car driver has a tire blow out and fatally crashes during a chase, the DA may press a felony murder charge and the jury may return a guilty verdict, but then the courts get an appeal added to their workload because the robber is not why the car had a defective or underinflated tire or why an overloaded dump truck dropped a piece of scrap metal on the road. But the DA gets re-elected for "being tough on crime".
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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