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wrote:

It doesn't make any difference *what* the device is, it still doesn't matter. Think about it: people connect 1-amp (or less) devices to 15- or 20-amp circuits all the time. Nobody except Stormin Mormon ever dreams there's a problem with plugging a table lamp into a circuit with a 15A breaker.
The exception you're thinking of with regard to welders refers to (for example) using a 30-amp device on a circuit with a 20-amp breaker.
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Since you have a 120v / 30A socket, it should ought to be possible to change the breaker that feeds that to a 20 amp breaker, and then put on the socket that matches your welder.
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Read Article 630 of the NEC. Welders have special rules on the size of branch circuit conductors, because the duty cycle may be less than 100%. They are also exempt from the small conductor ampacity rule 240.4(D), so it may be allowed to use a #14 copper conductor on a breaker larger than 15 amps.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Sat, 13 Jun 2009 17:23:36 GMT, Wayne Whitney

The real; problem with this idea is most small MIGs use a regular 5-15 plug so that will be considered a general use receptacle. Overloading with other equipment down the road is a very real possibility. If you are going to violate the code, his idea of paralleling the 14ga is a lot safer violation. (if there is such a thing)
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Well, if the welder has a 5-15 plug and #14 calcs out as an acceptable branch circuit for the welder, I don't see any violation there. But as you point it, it would be advisable to use a single receptacle and to label it as for welder use only.
Cheers, Wayne
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Rudy wrote:

the FIRST thing to do is to try it on the 15A outlet and see if the breaker will take it. Then, if not, just drop a 20 a. outlet out directly under your panel and use a good 10ga extension cord.
s
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The panel is in the basement, about 50 ft laterally from the garage with all drywalled walls and ceilings in between. (Its now in a bedroom) I don't know why the DOOFUS electrician didn't put the panel in the (attached) garage whe they were building the house. It would have been about 40 ft more "copper" to put it in there. I'da paid it.
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Rudy wrote:

Does the welder have a NEMA 5-15 plug or a 5-20 plug? If it's a -15 plug (has parallel prongs) they are not serious about the 20A rating and you can ignore it -- see what happens, you can run a new circuit later if you need to.
You've already figured out by now that you can't do a "ring" circuit (like I think they do in England) with the 14 ga cables.
Bob
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Ok, you've discussed in depth doubling 14/2's to increase the amperage, but here's a similar question with a twist.
Could I double 12/2's while keeping it protected with a 20A breaker? I'm thinking of a long run where I would be trying to compensate for voltage drop rather than trying to increase current capacity. The broke wire senario wouldn't apply since the circuit would still be in specs. And yeah, I could buy 10/2 but I've got a lot of spare 12/2. Just wondering.
Red
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Red wrote:

The National Electric Code only allows that with really big conductors (*really* big, but I don't remember the cutoff size, something like 4/0.) But I can't think of any reason it would be unsafe if you just did it anyway and didn't tell anybody.
How far are you running? The voltage drop in 12ga wire is not as much as you'd think.
Bob
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wrote:

    One very important reason for codes is to insure that when you are working on a system someone else put in, you know what to expect. When working with wiring, the unexpected is what is dangerous.
    Code is code, it is there for a reason. If you don't know why it is the way it is, then it is even more important that you follow the code exactly. If you think you know what it is the way it is, then that is also a good reason to follow the code.
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Gee where were you recently when idiots recommended removing ground pins and not grounding receptables to save money claiming its safe?
could of used your help at that time
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I have a triple gang box in the basement. Two of the switches are running from the normal/expected breaker but the third is a "3 way" which has power running to it from a different breaker. What does the "code" say about how to alert the "next guy" about this ? So far, I've written this info on the back of the decora plate with a Sharpie hoping the next guy can READ.
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wrote:

There is no NEC requirement or rule about this but a label can't hurt anything.
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Not legally, no. In general, conductors smaller than 1/0 are not allowed to be connected in parallel. There are a few exceptions, but none of them apply in residential situations. [2005 National Electrical Code, Article 310.4]
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Its a 5-15, Bob. The manual says it will work on "position 1" (Lowest setting) on 15A circuit. Guess I'll fire it up on a 15 and see what happens if I switch to 2, 3, and 4.
Sounds like I can work thru the unused 30A "RV" outlet on the outside of the garage and end up with a 20A "inside"
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