The economy -- are we replacing or repairing?

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I talked to an appliance repair lady who thinks the economy is picking up.
I think she said that when it's really dead, people do wtihout. If the laundry is broken, they take wet clothes to the laundro- mat to dry, or wash them and take em home wet.
Moderate economy, people repair stuff. (home repair).
Good economy, people buy new.
I'm not sure where we are, now, but I'm really struggling. Me, I think the economy is still bad. Not many people repairing. I talked to a contractor (retired), yesterday. He says the economy is so bad, that builders have gone into remodelling, to keep the cash flow.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Jan 5, 10:20 am, "Stormin Mormon"

There will always be people that do well in a down economy, and people that struggle in a good economy. It's the overall picture that counts, not just that of one person.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

The ancient wisdom was that in a downturn, the two entities that did well, no, make that very well, were shoe repair and religious bookstores.
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wrote:

There will always be people that do well in a down economy, and people that struggle in a good economy. It's the overall picture that counts, not just that of one person. ===================================================== Well, to make Stormin's small picture even smaller, I think he struggles tying his shoes in the morning. Not that he doesn't finally do a good job, just that it takes him quite a while....
--
EA




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On Jan 5, 7:20 am, "Stormin Mormon"

I was in Europe recently when the family I was staying with called the TV repairman to repair the TV. The guy took one look at the TV then proceeded to open it up. He then took out a bag full of parts that he had cut out from circuit boards of old electronic appliances. He found a capacitor and proceeded to replace a capacitor on one of the circuit board of the TV. He closed up the TV and turned it back on. The TV worked great. I asked him how he knew that it was that particular capacitor that was bad without having to test even a single one. He said that that model of TV was designed with that specific capacitor that was too weak that tended to burn out. I asked him how he managed to get a hold of the electronic schematic to know that it in the first place. He said he got it from the manufacturer which is a major European TV maker. He only charged what came to less than twenty American dollars for the whole thing. Here in the US they would want to replace the entire circuit board which would have to be special ordered that’s assuming the manufacturer had it and was willing to sell it and as for the electronic schematic, the manufacturer would refuse to provide it. With the labor and material cost together you would be better off buying a new TV. The moral of the story is: We’re getting screwed here in the US.
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On Thu, 5 Jan 2012 15:39:17 -0800 (PST), Molly Brown

I don't think that was a case of being designed to fail. It was simply not being designed not to fail. Some engineer was micro engineering everything to be exactly as strong as it had to be and he guessed wrong on this particular part. If you save a nickel on a part and you make a million units that is $50,000 directly to your bottom line and there are a lot of nickel parts in a TV. I was in the computer fixing biz for 30 years and we usually ended up replacing the same part on the same machine type over and over until someone came out with an engineering change and put in a better part that cost about a nickel more. At a certain point we were at Radio shack buying the part and doing our own ECs if we got tired of waiting. If it was rated at 50v, put in a 100v or 300v part. That usually made the problem go away.
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I had similar experience. Fixed a GE side by side refrigerator. Probably cost $1500 new. Only thing wrong with it, a .250 push on terminal was cheap quality, and not making proper contact.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

I don't think that was a case of being designed to fail. It was simply not being designed not to fail. Some engineer was micro engineering everything to be exactly as strong as it had to be and he guessed wrong on this particular part. If you save a nickel on a part and you make a million units that is $50,000 directly to your bottom line and there are a lot of nickel parts in a TV. I was in the computer fixing biz for 30 years and we usually ended up replacing the same part on the same machine type over and over until someone came out with an engineering change and put in a better part that cost about a nickel more. At a certain point we were at Radio shack buying the part and doing our own ECs if we got tired of waiting. If it was rated at 50v, put in a 100v or 300v part. That usually made the problem go away.
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On 1/5/2012 5:39 PM, Molly Brown wrote:

Nonsense, I recently repaired two large ViewSonic computer monitors for a commercial customer by replacing the common defective electrolytic capacitors in the power supplies of them both with higher voltage parts. The bill was certainly higher than $20.00 but much less than replacing the monitors with new ones which would break the same way after a short period of time. ^_^
TDD
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I hope you have several small children in your life. Who you can teach your repair skills. Because, the USA certainly needs people who can do useful work, and repair things. Sadly, I may be the end of the line, as I have no kids. And the ones near me are not interested in repairing things. Hmm. Wait, there is the 18 year old Tyler, who lives down the road. He's in trade school, learning how to repair cars. Might be hope.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I recently repaired two large ViewSonic computer monitors for a commercial customer by replacing the common defective electrolytic capacitors in the power supplies of them both with higher voltage parts. The bill was certainly higher than $20.00 but much less than replacing the monitors with new ones which would break the same way after a short period of time. ^_^
TDD
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On 1/6/2012 8:10 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have no children that I know of but my doctor gave me some bad news when he told me I could no longer have children. He said they contain too much sugar and I might choke on the small bones. ^_^
TDD
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Try em fried, instead of boiled. Boiling softens the bones too much.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I have no children that I know of but my doctor gave me some bad news when he told me I could no longer have children. He said they contain too much sugar and I might choke on the small bones. ^_^
TDD
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Bob F wrote:

Giggle.
Does anyone think that if unemployment fell to below 6% and private sector jobs increased to 400,000 per month and new car sales increased by over 30% compared to last year, that Barak Obama could get reelected?
I doubt he'll carry Illinois. Well, maybe Illinois but certainly not California.
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Bub, were those the stats from the last year of GWB?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Bob F wrote:

Giggle.
Does anyone think that if unemployment fell to below 6% and private sector jobs increased to 400,000 per month and new car sales increased by over 30% compared to last year, that Barak Obama could get reelected?
I doubt he'll carry Illinois. Well, maybe Illinois but certainly not California.
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On 1/5/2012 9:54 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I've been trying to find job statistics that make any sense to me. I would like to know the actual employment percentages of the total population over the past couple of decades. I think government agencies are deliberately obfuscating for the administrations benefit.
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That's my best guess, also.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I've been trying to find job statistics that make any sense to me. I would like to know the actual employment percentages of the total population over the past couple of decades. I think government agencies are deliberately obfuscating for the administrations benefit.
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On 01/06/12 02:16 pm, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Are people who are no longer collecting unemployment benefits (because they have run out) still counted as unemployed? How would they be tracked?
How, if at all, are the underemployed tracked -- those working part time who would like to have full-time jobs?
Are people working two part-time jobs counted twice as "employed?"
Perce
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On 1/6/2012 2:27 PM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

That's the point I'm trying to make. I think the rules have changed as to how unemployment is determined. Government bureaucrats, in spite of their personal political leanings, tend to follow their career goals by doing what they think their boss wants. Right now, their boss, fearing the next election, wants a low unemployment number. So, they give it to him.
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wrote:

They're cooking the books, but this isn't how it's being done. There are so many fudge factors in the numbers, it's an easy matter to come up with any number you want. There have been a number of articles recently on the number's they're fudging.
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On 1/8/2012 7:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

"There are lies, damned lies and statistics" Mark Twain or Benjamin Disraeli, whichever you prefer. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 08 Jan 2012 20:16:07 -0600, The Daring Dufas

The government bureaucrat was filling a "stimulus" position and had three candidates, a mathematician, a physicist, and an accountant. Deciding to be fair, as his boss surely would want him to be, he asked each one of them the same question, "What is two plus two?".
The mathematician replies, "For sufficiently large values of two, the result asymptotically approaches four".
The physicist answers the question, "Ignoring relativistic effects, two plus two equals four".
The accountant, upon hearing the question, gets up out of his chair and walks over to the door, closing it. He then whispers, "What would you like it to be?". ...and there, folks, you have your new bureaucrat.
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