The cellphone paradox - where are all the accidents?

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On 8/16/2015 6:25 PM, ceg wrote:

What if the same character flaw exists in people that not only contributes to them being drunk drives, but also contributes to being more easily distracted while driving?
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On 8/16/2015 11:03 PM, Muggles wrote:

Ideally, people pay attention to the road. For me, the reallity is that much of the time when I'm driving, my mind is on other things.
One anecdotal experience, is when I got my first cell phone. It was an early model, and set and cord, goes to a bag with a cod and antenna. I had only been on it for a couple minutes, and I was nearly in a wreck. I'd not yet learned the skill of paying most attention to the road, and less to the conversation. Since that time, I've seldom talked on the phone while rolling. But, I have developed more skill at paying attention to the road.
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On 8/17/2015 6:49 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't use the phone often while driving, and in the past had a blue tooth earphone that would answer a call automatically, so everything was hands free. Never had a problem with hands free and talking on the phone that way. The next phone I got had an awkward blue tooth device and I hated it, so chucked it and haven't used it. Rarely get a call while driving, and usually ignore it when it rings. I can always call them back. If I'm in stop and go traffic and at a stop light and it rings, I may answer it and tell them I'll call them back.
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On 8/17/2015 12:52 PM, Muggles wrote:

creates the biggest distraction. IOW, hands free does not make the conversation less distracting.
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On 8/17/2015 1:35 PM, SeaNymph wrote:

link to a multitude of studies.
http://www.nsc.org/learn/NSC-Initiatives/Pages/distracted-driving-how-cell-phone-distracted-driving-affects-the-brain.aspx
Additionally, there is much information about the myth of multi tasking.
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On Sunday, August 16, 2015 at 7:10:02 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

I think you're lost in space again. Listening to music doesn't require your concentration, you're paying attention to every word, so you can understand what the person on the phone is saying. It also doesn't require typing in numbers, looking up numbers in directories, responding because it's suddenly ringing and it may be your boss, texting, etc.
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On 8/16/2015 7:34 PM, trader_4 wrote:

What about talking to passengers in a car? If listening to music isn't considered to be a distraction, then talking to passengers wouldn't be considered to be a distraction, either, correct? Or, some may say all of those things are distractions, so then why would talking on a cellphone be any more or less a distraction than the others things I listed?
My comment said, "I highly doubt it's any more distracting than playing music might be."
Many people have adapted to multitasking. Driving in an act of multitasking all by itself.
Any distraction is only significant if the one dealing with the distraction is not adept at multitasking, or they've added some sort of impairment to their ability to pay attention.
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On Sunday, August 16, 2015 at 11:12:35 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

Wrong, for obvious reasons. A typical person is not nearly as engaged with listening to music as they are with a conversation with a person.
Or, some may say all

You can't understand that there can be different levels of distraction? You're as distracted when you're listening to music on a radio as you are when you're talking to your boss or a customer on a cell phone?

Yes, and again, it's still wrong.

Tests, simulations have shown that most people do have problems when talking on cell phones and that it's a source of accidents. Hell, unless you're blind you'd see it yourself. I regularly see people in cars on the highway, where the car is starting to weave, drift into my lane, or the gutter, slow down for no reason, etc. When I look closely, most of the time they are screwing around with a cell phone.
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On 8/17/2015 6:45 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Where did you get that information? I've seen people talking to their radio's, singing with their music, and otherwise interacting with the controls. That would seem to be distracting to me don't you think??

Sure, there are different levels of distraction, but a persons brain is still engaged with interacting with something besides the road and their car.

In your opinion, but not everyone agrees with that assessment. I can understand both sides of the discussion, tho.

I wonder how accurate those simulations are because people behave differently when they know they're being tested.

I've seen those things happen too, but I wonder why I don't hear about more accidents. It might just be that everyone is more aware of the use of cell phones so we're all paying more attention to the people who get distracted while driving.
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On Monday, August 17, 2015 at 1:48:52 PM UTC-4, Muggles wrote:

Of course you see people talking to their radio. But try looking around on those days when they let you leave the mental institution and see what you see then. But then maybe they don't let you out. That could explain a lot.

Irrelevant because the level of distraction matters.
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Per Muggles:

I have to agree with that.
Used to vanpool to work and therefore had the luxury of studying other drivers.
Every so often I would see a guy reading a news paper while driving in 50-60 mph traffic. Not just stealing furtive glances... I mean *reading* that sucker.
I have no clue how somebody does that and survives, but I've seen it firsthand. I guess some people's brains just work better than most peoples' in that situation.
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On 8/17/2015 8:53 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

geeesh! That would scare me to see that! One day I saw a woman putting on mascara while driving.
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On 8/16/2015 7:10 PM, Muggles wrote:

I agree with you, however, have you ever seen anyone playing a musical instrument while driving?I never have.
Listening to music though, is far different that talking on the phone. The brain can easily tune out the radio since it is a passive activity. The phone requires your active participation and concentration. It has been proven many times.
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So using a cell phone should be much more dangerous AND result in a SIGNIFICANT increase in accidents over the past 20 years as the use of cell phones has exploded. Yet there isn't the slightest evidence of that in the accident data.
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 19:51:58 -0700, Ashton Crusher wrote:

This is the conundrum.
If cellphones are as dangerous as we think they are, then the accidents *must* be going up.
But they're not.
So, something is wrong in our logic.
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On 8/17/2015 12:11 AM, ceg wrote:

According to NBC new tonight they are. We are on track to be higher than 2009, a 14% increase. Could be the highest number of fatalities in years. They said 55% were speed related, 25% cell phone related.
One of you is using the wrong statistics. Me thinks you are FOS.
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On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 20:03:18 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

You're talking fatalities, which is even further removed from accidents than injuries.
Why do you persist in muddling what is so very simple.
You and I believe that cellphone use is distracting enough to cause accidents, yet, those accidents aren't happening.
What part of that is full of shit? (Do you have *better* accident statistics?)
If so, show them.
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On 8/17/2015 10:45 PM, ceg wrote:

http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/why-more-people-are-dying-on-the-nation-s-roads-507057219572
http://www.usnews.com/news/politics/articles/2015/08/17/traffic-deaths-up-sharply-in-first-6-months-of-this-year On the other hand, a growing number of states are raising speed limits, and everywhere drivers are distracted by cellphone calls and text messages. The council estimated in a report this spring that a quarter of all crashes involve cellphone use. Besides fatal crashes, that includes injury-only and property damage-only crashes.
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On Tue, 18 Aug 2015 10:37:55 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

If a quarter of all crashes are "related to cellphone use", then why aren't accident rates going up by a quarter?
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On 8/18/2015 2:46 PM, ceg wrote:

Why would they? With automatic braking, lane detection, backup cameras and the like other rates may be going down. You have to look at all the numbers. Don't forget MADD too.
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