Thanks for Jeff Liebermann for suggesting the Costco cable modem!

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On 08/16/2015 06:33 AM, ceg wrote:

In my situation, yes. And it was easier for me to install some network jacks than to deal with wifi's idiosyncrasies.
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On Sat, 15 Aug 2015 19:57:19 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

These are good kids. They're not like I am. :)
The worst they do is *ask* me to get them a movie or two!
(jk)
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On 8/16/2015 1:35 AM, ceg wrote:

Sure, your kids are special and won't do anything while away at school.
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 01:57:36 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I think they watch "Desperate Housewives" on the net. At least I saw that as one of the web sites they visited.
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On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 06:18:00 +0000 (UTC), ceg

One of the nice features that browsers have now is a privacy viewing setting that does not save any tracks.
But none of that matters since your kids are so well behaved. Not like the kids and grandkids I have.
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On 8/15/2015 7:57 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Comcast always seems to charge the $50 then waits for the customer to call to argue about it. Probably many don't call.
I also got the Motorola modem at Costco and did a self-install and initially was charged the installation fee.
The problem I had was with getting them to install a drop, with RG6, from the pole. I told them I needed a drop because the old drop, which I had never used, was RG59. The first three trucks they sent were unprepared to do a new drop. Finally I used a tree trimmer to cut down the RG59 so there was no old drop there to confuse them, and then they were able to put in a new drop.
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On Tue, 18 Aug 2015 01:53:29 -0700, sms wrote:

That brings up a good question which I didn't know the answer to.
Being a cheapskate, I bought my coax cable from the Goodwill for a buck.
I know there are different impedances for coax cable, but I didn't know what letting to look for on the Goodwill coax cables.
So, the one I bought said "CATV" but I don't know if that's the right cable.
Is it?
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On Tue, 18 Aug 2015 19:30:42 +0000 (UTC), ceg

You want something in 75 ohms, not 50 ohms. That means one of the many mutations of RG-6/u.

CATV means CAble TV. That term hasn't been used in many years, so it's probably old cable with potentially ancient connectors. It may also be RG-59/u, which you should not be using (because most of it is garbage).
Incidentally, a quick test of the connector is to just pull on the connector. If it seperates from the coax cable, it's a lousy crimp, bad connector, or both. If you want to make your own cables, buy compression connectors and the right tools. <http://www.ebay.com/itm/171227302904 <http://www.ebay.com/itm/191352097155 <http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=coax+cable+stripper
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Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Tue, 18 Aug 2015 15:57:30 -0700, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

I don't remember it saying what the ohms were, but I'll visit this weekend, and look at the cable. It had nice long copper wires sticking out, so, I think it was home made, but sturdy nonetheless.

I'll look, this weekend, for RG figures, but I don't remember seeing them on the cable when I first bought it. They're getting 90Mbps down (and 10 Mbps up) out of both the Costco cable modem and out the back of the TP-Link router Ethernet cable, so, it's not too debilitating if it's the wrong cable.
The only bad thing is that they're getting only 60Mbps down over the air, but they're stuck on 2.5GHz in a crowded spectrum, so, I'll bring an Android phone with InSSIDer installed to check the noise.
I might even bring a spare ubiquiti nanobridge (Jeff knows what they can do) to check the noise spectrum, and if I do, I'll try to capture it to show you folks. That won't happen until the weekend though.
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<stuff snipped>

It started out being Community Antenna (or Access) TV . . .
<<The abbreviation CATV is often used for cable television. It originally stood for Community Access Television or Community Antenna Television, from cable television's origins in 1948: in areas where over-the-air reception was limited by distance from transmitters or mountainous terrain, large "community antennas" were constructed, and cable was run from them to individual homes. The origins of cable broadcasting are even older as radio programming was distributed by cable in some European cities as far back as 1924.>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_television
--
Bobby G.



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On Thu, 20 Aug 2015 09:11:25 -0400, "Robert Green"

Ok. Thanks for the history. However, I'm correct that "CAble TV" is the current acronym of choice.
Some anecdotal history. I got my start in cable with STV (Subscription TV) in Smog Angeles in about 1966(?). Back then, the acronym had already morphed into "CAble TV". Oddly, the wireless TV [1] companies were also calling their stuff "Subscription TV". The cable companies needed something to differentiate themselves from the wireless companies, so they borrowed the CATV acronym. Notice how nobody wanted to invent a new acronym as it was easier to just steal one from the competition.
[1] Don't ask about this: <http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/antennas/Misc/slides/subscription-TV-antenna.html
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Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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wrote in message

from

radio

as

Indubitably. I just remember recently seeing the two acronyms and their original meaning and thought I would share. (-"

To that I say "Digital Versatile Disk!"

<http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/antennas/Misc/slides/subscription-TV-antenna.ht ml>
Ever see an early Saturday Night Live where (I believe) Dan Ackroyd and Steven Martin are dressed as farmers looking off into the distance and saying: "What the heck IS that dang thing?"
My question exactly. It looks like a roto-tiller for Lilliputians.
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Bobby G.




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On Fri, 21 Aug 2015 16:57:11 -0400, "Robert Green"

That's what happens when acronyms are chosen by marketing or management. The theory is that the acronym has to be clever, while what it represents can be totally contorted and insane, because everyone is only going to use the acronym. The company with the most acronyms (and patents) wins.

Sigh. I told you not to ask, which proves that nobody listens to me. It's an early version of a bootleg wireless subscription TV antenna and receiver front end. It was favored by the Z-channel[1] wireless TV pirates of the early 1970's in Smog Angeles because it had more gain than the official antenna and therefore worked at longer distances. Officially, it's a "disk yagi" antenna, which is roughly a yagi TV antenna, using disks instead of rods. It's actually a very good antenna that quite easy to design and build: <http://www.idealantenas.com.br/ingles/produto/yagi%20disc19/yagidisc19_ing.htm Notice the lack of side and back lobes.
The uglier and stranger looking the antenna, the better it works.
Now, go away please. I just returned from Costco with a new Chromebook and some computah goodies for me and I want to play.
[1] Extra credit to Jeff Angus for reminding me of the company name. <(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
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Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
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Somehow the rule of "expand the acronym" for the first use in an article has pretty much fallen by the wayside. I come across at least a few every day that I have to look up because they're not as self-explanatory as the author may have thought. To be fair, it might have been an editor that elided the acronym expansion, but as far as I can tell, very few websites, newspapers and RATV stations use editors anymore. )-: FWIW, the Global Language Monitor also named the Most Confusing Tech Acronym of 2012:
The winner is SOA (solutions oriented architecture).
I think it actually means "Shi+ Out of Acronyms."

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I listened, I just didn't obey. (-: I don't obey anyone. You wouldn't want to infringe on my personal freedom by expecting me to make an exception for you, would you?

Ah, yagi, another word origin to look up. I didn't expect there would be homework.
Alas, it's not Yaw Aligned Geosynchronous Inductor or any such thing:
A highly directional and selective shortwave antenna consisting of a horizontal conductor of one or two dipoles connected with the receiver or transmitter and of a set of nearly equal insulated dipoles parallel to and on a level with the horizontal conductor.
That's what it is alright. Origin. 1940s: named after Hidetsugu Yagi (1886-1976).
When I bought my first radial arm saw I went to Sears to buy a dado blade kit and of course, there was an attractive young salesclerk working the power tools register that day who clearly didn't know what a dado blade was but probably thought it was something that sounded similar.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/dado is full of dadoes.
FTR, its origin is from 1655-65 and might be from Italian: die, cube, pedestal, or perhaps an Arabic dad game, Now what, you might ask, is an Arab dad game? Dunno. Google is not being helpful:
Angry Arab dad over card game - YouTube www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCzmTXQ7UXg
Ah, Google. It's just not very good at such searches, still.

<http://www.idealantenas.com.br/ingles/produto/yagi%20disc19/yagidisc19_ing . htm>

Upon first read I thought we were talking about physical lobes on the antenna and then I realized you're talking about the polar graph of the radiated power. I poked around Google but couldn't find out why this style of antenna is side/rear lobe-lacking. I'll keep looking. I assume it's the size and linear design that does it. Obviously I am not a radio geek but rather a cross-post asylum seeker from AHR, which seems to have a terminal nitwit troll infection.

Apparently. While the specs don't match the parabolic antenna I use for Wi-Fi, the size of this yagi antenna and its reduced wind load certainly have advantages.

Don't get me started on Chromebooks, Android, Stagefright and Google. My favorite experience with the Chromebook was trying to get connectivity help. No help available unless you're on line, no ability to get on line unless you can get help with the various settings. A bit of a paradox.
Another fine experience for these aging eyes was to discovering how tiny the icons are even on a large screen. Still haven't found a good way around that. Also, no tool-tips but plenty of oddball things happen with mouseovers sending me to pages I am pretty sure I didn't select.
Still, at $150 it beats the hell out of a lot of other options, has HDMI output and sort of even works with my old PS-2 keyboard and Intellimouse trackball using a USB to PS/2 adapter. Unfortunately, the trackball seems to require three times as many revolutions to travel the same distance as it does hooked into a PC. Can't find any settings that alter that behavior. Solve that problem and I will publicly proclaim you as "hero patriae" (for a day).

Netflixers out there can rent it (as I just did - sounds good) at:
http://dvd.netflix.com/Movie/Z-Channel-A-Magnificent-Obsession/70022311
Now go play with your Chromebook which I've renamed my Crohnbook because it gives me such a bellyache. Leaving in a positive note, the Crohnbook does have a far more sensitive wi-fi card than many of my other wi-fi devices and works in places the others won't.
I also understand the newest Chromebooks can run lots of older legacy applications but don't know the details. I guess the industry has finally realized that end users are getting quite reluctant to abandon something that works for the next "greatest" thing in computing.
--
Bobby G.



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It's actually a very good antenna that quite easy to design and build:

Yes, the lobes are the often unwanted directions and ammount of signal pickup/radiated of the antenna.
The Yagi type antennas can be designed for maximum gain or minimum side lobes with decent gain. It all has to do with the spacing of the elements, the number, and the lengths of them. The physical size (length of the boom) does not have too much to do with the side lobes, but the longer it is, the larger and narrower the main beam usually is.
If designed for maximum gain, it will usually have larger and more side lobes. Sometimes the bandwidth (frequency range) will have a factor in the lobes. OUtside of the design frequency range the lobes become very pronounced and the main beam may be distorted and lots smaller.
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wrote in message news:mramg4>>

<http://www.idealantenas.com.br/ingles/produto/yagi%20disc19/yagidisc19_ing .

but

terminal

elements,

I assume that spacing corresponds in some way to the frequency you wish to transmit or receive. Conceptually I still don't get why a rod with all those disks "skewered" like a shish-kabob can focus the radio energy like a parabolic dish.

the

Thanks for the info. I would like to be able to send and receive wifi from a nearby free hot spot but the signal's not quite strong enough. A yagi antenna looks like it could do the trick except that my tablet and netbook don't have external antenna ports for wifi. I asked someone once and they said an antenna connection would cause serious signal loss at wifi frequencies but I don't know if that's true. I know that some people have opened up various wireless devices and added antenna jacks, but I doubt I will be doing that.
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It would take a good diagram to explaine that. I doubt I can explain it in words.
Try to picture a radio wave comming toward the antenna like a flat line. If only a single antenna element the line would mostly pass the antenna and only a small portion would be received. Now picture the antenna with many elements and the line comming toward the antenna. As it hits the first element, it bends like a rubber band, the more elements it passes the more it bends. By the time it gets to the driven element (the one that actually picks up the signal) the signal is bent into a long cigar type shape and more of it will hit the driven element.
The length and the spacing of the elements are related to the frequency you want to receive or transmitt.
There are several software programs that let you do computer modleing of the antennas. Here is a link to one that has a free demo program that allows for simple antenas. http://www.eznec.com/
Most all of them are based on the same basic software program.
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I bought an SB6121, a month or two before it would have made sense to by a 6141, but in any event, the Motorola/Arris anything is better than the Arris/Arris that Comcast provides.

I knew I hadn't paid an install fee, and forgot how that happened. I took the "$8/month" modem/router, because once upon a time, I had so much trouble with cable that they replaced the modem several times before they replaced the drop, and I didn't want to have that argument with customer owned equipment. But, after a month or two of horrible WiFi, I went with the 6121 and an Asus router.

Mine took a couple of minutes on the phone.
In a reply to another post, speedtest.comcast.net shows IPv4 and IPv6 numbers, speedtest.net only shows IPv4.
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Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65

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On Wed, 19 Aug 2015 03:09:23 +0000, dold wrote:

I never heard of "Arris" before. Why do they bother with two names anyway? Why not just an "arris" or just a "motorola" modem?

Comcast told me it's $10 a month for a modem, and $6 for the self install, so, prices are different here in California.

It was pretty quick for me too. The guy just made all the lights blink a few times and that was it. About 10 minutes. Maybe 15 but not much more (I wasn't timing it though - but it was pretty quick).

I never understood IPv6, so, I wouldn't know the difference.
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On Wed, 19 Aug 2015 03:09:23 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@93.usenet.us.com wrote:

Every time some company produces a decent modem, Motorola buys them. The good stuff was made by Netopia and Cayman, both now Motorola companies. However, there was quite a bit of absolute junk being shipped during the transitions. Now that Motorola own Arris, I expect more of the same until things settle down. Incidentally, some of the Comcast "gateways" that I detest are made by Pace, which now owns 2-wire. <http://customer.xfinity.com/help-and-support/internet/wireless-gateway-compare/ I think TG and TC are Arris, SMC is SMC, DPC are Pace. The Gateway 3 drives seem decent (i.e. they do dual band). If you simply take whatever Comcast is leasing, you're likely to get a Gateway 1 or 2 until the supply runs out. If you try to buy your own, the only one of these on the approved modem list is a Gateway 1 (TG862G).

Yep. I'm doing much of the same thing for my customers. The only problem is if they order phone service from Comcast, I'm stuck with a very small list of acceptable "telephony gateway" devices. The latest irritation is trying to get an Arris TM722/TM822 activated. They're both on the approved modem list: <http://mydeviceinfo.comcast.net but not listed as "retail". Customers are buying perfectly legal and brand new devices from various vendors, only to find that Comcast claims that they can't be activated. There's a screwup somewhere. Of course, the ONLY retail telephony gateway available is the Gateway 1 TG862G, which has the wireless problems you describe. I suppose that the TM722 and TM822 will magically go back onto the approved retail devices as soon as the stock of TG862G junk gateways is depleted.

I did one yesterday that took about 20 minutes online total. However, this was a new modem transplant for an existing customer. I plugged in an SB6141, waited about 10 mins for things to settle down. I had a computah plugged directly into the modem. I went to some random web site and Comcast redirected me to the activation page. I gave it the account number and associated phone number. It thrashed around for about 10 minutes updating the modem firmware, rebooted twice, and worked as expected. However, the old modem was still working so I called Comcast support to make sure that the old (customer owned) modem will disappear from the bill. I was blessed with a very concientious support person, who answered every question except the ones that I asked. I guess we'll have to wait for the bill to arrive.

True. Since Windoze 10 seems to use IPv6 before trying IPv4, that's important. I've had a few odd problems which I've avoided by just turning off IPv6 in the router until things settle down and I have some time to assign the blame.
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150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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