Texture to Oil or Latex Paint


Three season porch bare drywall 350 sq. feet
I need a primer coat and a finished color. Because of high humidity, I plan on using an oil-based primer and tinted latex as the finish coat. I want a sand texture wall and usually add the dry texture plastic particles to the primer and apply with a roller. I am thinking it would be less of a mess to roll the primer on and then add the texture to the latex finish coat. Any reasons why this would not work? thanks
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Uhm... I don't think you can put Latex over Oil. I could be wrong, but I'd go with all oil or all latex.

Should be OK, but the finish coats lifetime will be reduced a fair bit due to the extra wear it will see. If you can, use the sand on the first finish coat and then plain paint on the second coat.
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Noozer wrote:

Properly applied, dried and cured you can put either over the other. New drywall primer should have a drywall primer for the right situation. Drywall primers are usually latex, I believe. Vapor barrier on outside?

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On 19 Feb 2007 05:32:03 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

Use an oil based enamel undercoat, not just a plain oil primer. The latex will bond well to it.

Mix the texture with the under coater; the catalyst for texture is water, so mixing it with latex won't bring the desired results you want
thanks Don
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Will that texture be coarse enough to tear off tiny bits of the sponge you use to wipe the walls down, thereby causing you to want to kill yourself for thinking texture was such a hot idea? I've seen a few textured walls like that.
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But dishcloth works fine for wipedown. Never had an issue there. (I use sand, though, for texture.) And it hides better to begin with.
The main disadvantage of textured paint is that it's pretty much there forever, and future options for wallpaper or smooth walls are gone.
Although I do have certain wall areas and ceilings textured for their advantages and I like the look.
Banty
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Well, I've only had to live with two textured walls, neither of which was inflicted upon the house by me. Both were sharp enough to snag *anything* I tried to clean them with. Maybe some people never clean walls. The OP's talking about a room which sounds like it could have lots of outdoor air circulation. In many locations, the air's none too clean, as we can see from the dirt on our siding, windows, cars, etc. I'd go for a smooth surface.
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On Feb 19, 7:32 am, snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

The standard wisdom is to never put latex over oils though it can be successfully done as others have pointed out. Why not just go with latex throughout??
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