Testing dollhouse circuits and bulbs

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They might help to identify the replacement she needs. They may be better marked** than the one good bulb. Plus she won't have to carry the one good bulb with her when she goes out to get replacement bulbs.
I don't throw away bad parts until I have everything working.
**Which is not to say the OP needs exactly what was in there before. Only that the base fit the socket and the voltage be right. Different makers of bulbs may well use different part numbers, for example.
(My father made a picture album in 1936, and in 1990 I went to a lot of the same places and took a lot of the same pictures. I wanted to add facing pages to his album, to show the changes in 53 years, and I wanted to use the adhesive corners to hold the pictures, like he used.
(Most camera stores had clear vinyl, which of course have the advantage of letting one see the corners, but I found one store that sold the black paper corners my father used, identical, complete with the same error in part of the embossed line.)

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<stuff snipped>

I don't throw away bad parts. Period. (-: Unless there's absolutely nothing I can cannibalize or jury rig later.
-- Bobby G.
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Start by finding out the voltage requirements of the bulbs, then see if your power supply is working properly putting out the right voltage for the bulbs. Replace all the bulbs while you at it, sounds like more are bad than good. This will make further troubleshooting easier and may solve all your problems to start with.
Jimmie
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Continuing on, I bought an old doll house several years ago and it had problems with lighting too. After replacing the bulbs I found that several of the switches were bad. The one house is the limit of my experience and my local hobby store owner was the source of all my info. Oh yeah a little contact cleaner in the light sockets helps too. I use DeOXit. I recommend using this on all the bulbs and switches.
Jimmie
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Jennifer,
Get a lightbulb that fits into the socket. Wrap it in cloth and whack it gently with a hammer. You want to break the glass. Once you've done that cut the filament. Now you can measure the voltage on each filament wire.
Dave M.
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I've had those size bulbs in my hands, years ago. Your suggestion is sincere, but I really doubt that it's practical. The inside wires are too small, too close together. And the bulb inside the doll house is going to be in an odd direction.
That ranks up there like breaking a popsickle stick or tongue depressor with enough wood left connecting the two halves. We did that (unsucsessfully) for a cub scout project.
--

Christopher A. Young
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This is an old radio pilot light bulb
#50 is a 6 volt... May have been run from a battery or a transformer Look here for a chart
http://oldradios.co.nz/data/index7.htm

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I want to thank everyone who offered helpful suggestions and advice. I got started too late to get the dollhouse lights working so I just finished fixing up the house itself. It was a big hit on Christmas morning. When I get some time, I'll finish the lights. My plan is to replace the transformer with a battery pack and use LED lights. I'll probably have to replace the four toggle switches.
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On Tue, 27 Dec 2011 07:49:40 -0500, "Robert Green"

We got it all fixed up except for the lights. She absolutely loved it. Once she saw it, she lost interest in opening up any other presents. It really is a cool dollhouse. It has a very realistic brick chimney on the side, windows that actually slide, and all kinds of little accessories.

Thanks for the pointer. I don't completely agree with you about a transformer being as safe as a battery pack, but it woulod be a biug improvement over what's there now. The other advantage to batteries is no cord to trip over. Everything is inside the house.

Those power supplies look like they have a round plug like for cameras and computers. Would I get a compatible plug to mount on the side of the dollhouse? I didn't see anything on the website.

I'm not sure how I'd use that type of LED. I don't want to remove the E10 base sockets. I couldn't find any E10 base bulbs on their website.
They are available other places:
This place has several types for 12vdc and they come in colors:
http://www.ledlight.com/e10-screw-base-t10-concave-led-light.aspx
Here's another, but a lot more expensive:
http://www.bulbtown.com/LM1012MS_W_LED_MINIATURE_BULB_E10_BASE_p/lm1012ms-w.htm
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