Testing dollhouse circuits and bulbs

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No. I'm isolexic, Or maybe they said photolexic. Or polyunlexic.
But I think maybe the real problem was that we didn't have any new wire and the old stuff had curves already in it. I didnt' want to cut off 6 inches to get to the part that was straight.
Also, it wasn't the knot at the top but just an overhand knot I was doing, and one side always seemed to overpower the other.. I eventually stopped making knots inside plugs on the theory I never pull the plugs out by the cord anyhow.

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I've tied no more than a few in my life because I've scrounged so many nice cords with built in strain reliefs for anything I build.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

Craft stores might be even better than toy stores learning about building and refurbishing doll houses. At least some of them.

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On 12/21/2011 12:04 PM, micky wrote:

Michaels probably carried some basic miniature lighting gear, but there are loads of online sources with all manner of transformers, wiring, sockets, fixtures, etc. Don't need to be an electrician to install it.
If it was doable, refurbishing an old dollhouse, I would update it with more modern trans. and wiring...for safety as well as aethetic.

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wrote:

What is the safety issue? The little bulbs don't get very hot.
I have radios going back to the 1930's and their transformers, cords, and internal wiring are in excellent shape. The only thing that wears out is the capacitors, which a doll house won't have.
Aesthetic is a matter of taste, of coures, but I would like to keep it original, and also no one I know uses LEDs for lighting.

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most older radios have NON POLARIZED PLUGS and hot chassis. along with no ground
a real hazard......
these sort of issues are why a wiring upgrade may be a good idea
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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 20:23:32 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"
I'll bet 10,000 dollars that thks doll house has no chassis at all, let alone a hot one. Shake?

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wrote:

I agree. Highly unlikely, but anything's possible. Install a GFCI plug like the one that came with my air conditioner and polarization and grounding aren't much of a issue anymore.
-- Bobby G.
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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 20:23:32 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Its wooden, so it is NOT a "hot chassis"
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news:28267e64-ef7f-4a02-8f25-
<stuff snipped>

Good advice, but for radios. I doubt there's very much metal in the unit anywhere so there's nothing really to ground. As Micky pointed out, the only potentially dangerous part is the line cord. I don't think polarized plugs are much of an issue, either, because of the transformer and what sounds to be all wood construction. The OP can tell us if there's metal used that could become a shock hazard. The easiest solution to all of that is to install a GFCI plug.
-- Bobby G.
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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 19:35:48 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Not very well, but you still count. So I know one person who does.

Aren't they still expensive?

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wrote:

Depends what you call expensive and where you buy them. The loacal HomeDespot wants $23 each for them. I imported mine directly from Hong Kong for $11.80 each, delivered to the door, Quantity 10. And that is the "dimmable" 85-240 volt model, The straight 110 volt non-dimmables can be had for about $9.00 each. Priced 50 watt GU10s lately??

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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 19:34:53 -0800 (PST), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

>>>>>>http://www.radioshack.com/search/index.jsp?kwCatId=&kw=miniature%20la ...- Hide quoted text -

You need 12-14 watt LED 60 watt equivalen(7 watt)t is about $20 at american Home Depot stores. About 50% more in Canada. Wholesaled.com has 9watt for $32 Or check EBAY and order direct from China.
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On Thu, 22 Dec 2011 09:59:33 -0500, "Robert Green"

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recently
how
(-"
Break, break. Where's the message? (-:
-- Bobby G.
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<stuff snipped>

Lethal. One of the very first stories I reported on when I became a police reporter was one of a little 3 year old kid who was on the kitchen counter and kissed his reflection in the toaster. DOA. It turned out that the insides of the toaster had been mangled by repeated attempts to remove stuck items with metal forks. He apparently made contact with the sink rim with his foot.
I'm thinking there's probably an old model train transformer in that house - they had multiple taps and short-circuit protection that made a funny "tick-boom" sort of sound when activated.
-- Bobby G.
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On Wed, 21 Dec 2011 03:33:27 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Yes, I'm quite sure that it's nowhere near 110 at the sockets. My guess is that (a) it was once 2.5 vdc and is now somewhat weaker or (b) it was originally 1.0-1.5 vdc for a softer light.

For now, I'll probably replace the bulbs and see how much works. Later, I may consider replacing the transformer with a battery pack and use LEDs with an E10 base.
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Jennifer - The output of a transformer is AC, not DC. Considering the age of the dollhouse as evidenced by the cloth power cord, it is very unlikely that the output of whatever transformer was used is converted to DC using a rectifier. So, work on the assumption that everything is AC. IF you can find someone who is reasonably knowledgeable, there are ways to test if the voltage is AC or DC, but with your situation, I'd just go with the AC.
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On Tue, 20 Dec 2011 12:42:00 -0800, Jennifer Murphy

I very often use a jumper wrie with alligator clips on each end, especailly for connecting the black test lead of the meter to a grouond, or anywhere I want it connected. That leaves both hands free to use the other test lead. I buy ten 12" wires for 3 or 4 dollars at Radio Shack, and I clip one end to the metal proble of the test lead.
For small things, I put a hat pin, or corsage pin, or straight pin, or headless nail thinner than the original probe in the alligator clip at the other end. So I can test i cramped areas.

For a doll house, if it's plugged into the wall, it's AC. If it runs on batteryies it's DC.
IIRC, you can measuere DC current with an AC meter. The reading will be wrong, but consistent and proportional to the actual value. The RMS iirc. This is with an analog meter. Not sure how digital meters behave.
On the other hand try to meaure AC with a DC meter and the average value will be zero. Because the *average* voltage of AC *is* zero. On an analog meter that's what it will show. Not sure if it would jump around with a digital meter, or not.

Dolls have excellent vision, and don't need much light to read. Don't forget, that if they are only 3 inches tall and you are more than 60 inches tall. the light seems 20 times brighter for them.

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