Termites

My significant other is absolutely right about almost everything. So much so, that I am almost doubting myself on this issue.
Here is the problem...
When I bring firewood into the house, I first make a small pile, of about four logs, by my back door. I make this little stack by the door so that I can have quick access to the logs when the fire requires replenishing. It saves me the time of putting on my shoes to walk the extra 10 steps to the wood pile and pulling back the tarp that covers the wood. The trouble, as my S.O. sees it, is that the logs leave crumbs of wood on the asphalt driveway which connects to the concrete foundation outside my back door, will cause termites to invade our house. The only wooden part of my house that is close to it is a painted wooden door frame.
Now granted, you aren't supposed to store wood or have mulch close to your house, but it is my belief is that these little pieces of wood are absolutely and positively no danger of "attracting" termites. Heck, the wood pile is ten steps away! Why wood... errr... would they bother with these little bits of dry wood when they have so many other sources of moist wood all around us? Heck... I live in the forest! <sigh>
Anyway... do any of you see any harm from leaving crumbs of wood... or even a log of wood outside my back door?
TIA Noah
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Not this time. You win, but correct her with great humility!

I leave a day's worth of logs on the redwood deck against my house all the time, and the deck structure and siding are both wood. No, termites don't get "attracted" by a few crumbs. It is however a good idea to keep sufficient space between the woodpile and any structure it sits next to. My main woodpile is under 3-foot eaves, sitting on brick path, and held off the ground by cross- pieces, with a 6" air gap between the wall next to it. Also, keep wood on a dry, well-drained spot. I also criss-cross the wood to hasten seasoning and keep it dry and well drained. Continuously wet wood will eventually begin to rot, and in that state it becomes very attractive to termites.
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This is Turtle.
Termites don't like wood off the ground or not enclosed which will leave them expossed to other insects or birds. If they have to go into a open space before going back in the gound . they will not do it for it's too dangerous to do so.
A few pieces of wood on a drive way has no bearing on termites to be drown to it.
If termites are in your area. What you do with the fire wood has very little bearing if you keep it off the ground and the termites have to come out in the opening to get to it. If you live in a forest your odds are very good of not getting them for they eat moist wood and if your house wood is dry. Your not a very good meal for them. Now after I tell you this the termites will change their mine and start eating dry wood of your home. they will eat pine , hardwood, or others but one wood they don't like and that is what we call rich liter pine. The pine trees that the old old house was made out of. If you go in your attic and see sap dripping out of the rafters. They will not touch it. Most houses built over 80 years ago will have this liter pine in them.
Now there is one type of termite that has hit the U.S.A. now days and started in Florida and has been seen as far as Louisiana and they are Non-Ground type termites and never have to go to the ground everyday to go back to the nest. They will go to your attic and just stay there and never go back to the ground. They fly into your attic or home and are not ground type termites. I'm not clear on them for my bug man who sprays my house was telling me about them and he said they have not got the pattern they like as of not to get rid of them.
I'm not a termite expert at all but i listen to my termite / Roach pest control man. He has them pegged when keeping them out of my house and I have fire wood everywhere around my house. He says keep it off the ground.
TURTLE
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Three major types of termites live here - dry-wood, damp-wood, and subterranean. Many varieties within each group, and different varieties in different areas of the country. Dry wood and subterranean have very different methods of control. All have swarmers, which are mating couples flying off to establish new colonies. Subs do the most structural damage in Florida, and the infamous Formosans in New Orleans are a type of sub. Dry wood terms don't need to leave the wood to get moisture. Subs build mud tubes to get from colony in ground into your wood; they also like entries like openings for pipes and the inside of crawlspaces. Anyone with wood parts on their house should be familiar with the methods of detection and prevention. We have annual inspections, but I've never had a termite inspector ask to open the plumbing access panel to look. I do that myself.
Our condo has had neglected areas, including an exterior panel that had sprinklers blasting it for years. Big hole. Rotted 2x4's. Section of 1x12 with nothing left of it but the paint. Very interesting clue: they do not eat paint.

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This is Turtle.
What is the name of the termite that lives in the attic and does not have to go the ground to get a drink of water ? My bug man was suppose to get with me to give me the name but he can't pronounce it and did not have his books to look it up and forgot to call me back.
TURTLE
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041216 1937 - TURTLE posted:

I think his name is Mergatroyd...
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On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 18:37:33 -0600, "TURTLE"
:) This is Turtle. :) :) What is the name of the termite that lives in the attic and does not have to go :) the ground to get a drink of water ? My bug man was suppose to get with me to :) give me the name but he can't pronounce it and did not have his books to look it :) up and forgot to call me back.
Dry wood termites. Formosan termites in their nesting habits can live extended time out of the ground, but they are a type of subterranean termites.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
Dancing dog is back! http://media.ebaumsworld.com/smartdog.wmv
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 23:54:48 -0500, "Noah Vail"
:) Now granted, you aren't supposed to store wood or have mulch close to your :) house, but it is my belief is that these little pieces of wood are :) absolutely and positively no danger of "attracting" termites. Heck, the :) wood pile is ten steps away! Why wood... errr... would they bother with :) these little bits of dry wood when they have so many other sources of moist :) wood all around us? Heck... I live in the forest! <sigh> :) :) Anyway... do any of you see any harm from leaving crumbs of wood... or even :) a log of wood outside my back door?
The only concern would be if you kept thewood there year round. The colony will have many spots around the yard they will feed at. The same colony can be feeding on the wood pile, getting into your home, feeding off of mulch in your neighbor's flowerbed and any "little" pieces of wood they may come across.
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
Dancing dog is back! http://media.ebaumsworld.com/smartdog.wmv
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They aren't like ants, following a trail of crumbs for food. The risk is in establishing a new colony connecting to your house. The doorway may have a teeny, tiny gap between two pieces of wood, which lets in a little moisture and a few termites. Wood already infested which is stored in close proximity to wood parts of the house and which blocks the view of their entry is risky. If you need to keep it at the door, keep it in a covered plastic tub. They don't like daylight, so don't go crawling over your driveway looking for "scraps". They do swarm, during mating season, and look for entry to the right conditions. Whether a dead limb or your house in not a matter of concern. If their path leads, unobstructed, to your house they will dine. Kind of like keeping teenagers out of the fridge - if you block up the kitchen door, they will open the window :o)
It's kind of funny to see discussion of "attracting" termites. They are everywhere there is wood/cellulose in the outdoors and have a benefit in nature. Just don't want them, hippos, or cobras inside the house :o)

I doubt that crumbs are a threat. But a nice big oak with a dead limb hanging over your shaded, not-too-healthy roof is a threat. Should keep a clear path around the house that keeps wood, vegetation, mulch and the soil at least 6-8" distance from any wood, and inspect inside and outside of foundation regularly.

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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 23:54:48 -0500, "Noah Vail"

There's little concern. But to keep your S.O. happy agree to sweep up the crumbs once in awhile. I suspect a deeper problem than wood crumbs.
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