Terminating an alarm company contract early

Page 2 of 3  
Dan wrote:

You also might see if your state has a consumer protection office and contact them. Also the Better Business Bureau may help.
Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, Lou
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan wrote:

If any suggestions work please post back.
Lou
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

By the time he gets back to you, or by the time they activate the system, they will have signed their own contract. Use reverse 411 to get their numbre and call them directly. Or you or ask a friend in the n'hood to go over their and get their number, or at least leave a note on their door asking them to call you.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

But what did the company do wrong? He didn't pay for the alarm up front (thats the "all this for $99 commercial") so the deal is that he has to pay for the deferred installation cost over the 3 year contract period.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

I didn't say the company did anything wrong -- OP asked for options to try to minimize his out-of-pocket cancellation charges. I told him where there might be some relief _IF_ (and that's the proverbial "big if") there had been some judgment in his state that the particular form of cancellation clause had been deemed excessive previously or wasn't compliant w/ state law/regulation. Some have been, whether this particular one has or not would be the question. It's a faint hope, for OP, certainly. The contract terms weren't supplied so whether it is actually a deferred installation charge or not isn't known for sure--reasonable hypothesis, certainly.
I also told OP I figured he was stuck but that was really only way he could likely hope for a basis on which to try to refuse to pay. Otherwise, about his only hope is the option of trying to see if they'll accept a partial payment or get the successor tenant to pick it up for him (but that undoubtedly wouldn't get him relieved from the obligation only have the other guy pay it for him as long as he so chose to do so).
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

Please read the OP's posts before you post.
The alarm system was already installed by th property owner BEFORE the OP, as a renter, moved in.
Wasn't anything to "pay for " "up front". The $"$99.00" come on never applied in this case.
Facts matter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jJim McLaughlin wrote:

I did, the OP said he was 15 months into a 3 year alarm contract and wanted to not pay to terminate the contract. He mentioned nothing else.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

You're not too bright, are you?
May 19, 5:19 PM, Dan posted i> > There was no installation. The system/their yard signs/window stickers were > present in the house when we signed the lease. I'm assuming the landlord, > who had lived in the house prior to renting it, had it installed. There was > no mention of a "break" for signing a 3 year contract, or of any alternate > time arrangement, in fact there was no mention of the term at all either > when I called to initiate the service, or when the guy came out to "test it" > & get me to sign, even when I told him we were renting & looking to buy in > the near future. Obviously he knew, but said nothing. I assumed it was > month to month. There is no mention of any term on the front of the > contract, it only appears on the back, which in retrospect I should have > taken 45 minutes to read (all 4 legal-size, fine-print boiler plate-ese > pages of it) while the "technician" stood there twiddling his thumbs. This > was my 1st experience with an alarm company, had I known what I know now, I > would have done things differently. I assumed it was like any other > "utility", cable, electric, telephone, gas, etc., maybe you had an > activation charge, but after that you paid monthly for as long as you used > the service & when you were done, you were done. I'm sure all the arm-chair > know-it-alls will claim they ALLLLLLWAYS read all the boiler plate, > regardless of how long & regardless of who's waiting but most people don't, > a fact the businesses rely on. I have an e-mail in to the landlord > inquiring if the new tenants have signed with them. For all I know, the > people before us are still paying for an early termination, the present > tenants are paying for current service, and they expect me to pay until 2009 > as well. Is this legal? Well I'm sure their army of attorneys has assured > that it is. Whether it's right is another question. > n this thread:
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Jun 2007 08:39:11 -0700, jJim McLaughlin

Come to think of it, I can cancel my in-house telephone and electric any time I wanted, but I didn't sign a contract for them. I just called on the phone and they connected it afaicr. Gas is like that too.
I don't remember cable tv. And I don't know about cable internet or voip.
Cellphones have all kinds of longterm deals.
Burglar alarm companies might well need a contract even when one can cancel at will, because they need the customer to acknowledge the limitations of the services provided. They're not going to send an army if the alarm goes off, only call you and then call the police. I haven't seen one of those contracts yet, but I wonder if it limits the promises it makes on that. like "within 5 minutes".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

BTW, it's "fair" for you to pay the extra 50 or 100. You in effect wagered that yhou would be there the whole three years and save on a 3-year contract over a month to month contract. You lost the bet and it wouldn't hurt to pay extra. If you would have saved 300 over 3 years (8 dollars a month), that's 100 over one year, so the extra 100 paid for 15 months is still losing less than you would have gained had you stayed the whole 3 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Yes. OP said,
"They are billing us for the remainder of the term, nearly $700. Needless to say, I would prefer not to pay for service we will not be using."
See?
To OP: my best advice is to tell them to go take a flying one.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Why would the AG be interested?
The usual deal with the "big box" alarm companies is that they advertise "protect your house and family for $99". Obviously they can't do that so they require that you enter a contract so that you actually pay for the system over the contract term. Nothing illegal about that. The contract contains specific language that needs to be fulfilled. In this case they want to be paid to cover the deferred cost of the installation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

Individually, he isn't -- the point is whether the AG's _office_ has had enough complaints there's been a general action or ruling that makes such cancellation clauses illegitimate in OP's state.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

As OP explained later in the thread, he was a renter and the alarm system was in place when he rented. He has been paying only for service and has no obligation to pay for future service that is not rendered. Any unfulfilled obligation to the alarm company for installation lies with whoever arranged for installation originally.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dadiOH wrote:

Finally, somebody who actually comrehended the fact pattern.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
jJim McLaughlin wrote:

Those facts weren't disclosed initially and we still haven't seen any of the wording of the contract that he signed, so we don't have a clue of what the contract terms are.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL - apparently, neither does he...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And apparently you'd rather been insulting than insightful, but my guess is that well's pretty dry where you're concerned.
Plonk, moron.
Thank you to all who provided helpful replies.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan wrote: ...

It is easy (and somehow more fun, too :) ) to pontificate, though... :(
I'm still guessing your best hope would be for the new renter to simply pick up on the existing contract w/o involving the provider further -- I'm guessing they would want yet another extended contract. What else you might be able to negotiate is anybody's guess...
As I noted, I've done without some services simply because the terms offered routinely are too onerous/one-sided imo and I haven't desired the service badly enough to fight the battle. Fortunately I haven't had to make the stand on something of either real importance or of an insatiable desire otherwise... :)
Good luck...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.