Tenants will not allow access to make repair

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Greetings,
I have some tenants which have water running (leaking) in the basement but they will not let me in to make repairs. What are my rights to get in and make the repairs before waiting the 30 days (or whatever it takes) to evict them?
Thanks, William
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What in the world are you doing asking here? You don't even say which state you are in.
Go to the local authorities, get the information, and do it by the book.
I live in Nevada. What you are doing makes as much sense as me asking what the weather is going to be like tomorrow. From someone in Vermont!
Steve
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How do you know the water is leaking? They probably have a grow operation down there and the water is 'leaking' to hydrate their crop.
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olaf wrote:

Would be interesting to check electric utility bills and let the PD know if there is unusual usage since they moved in :o)
Do you have a lease? What does it say about access? Jeesh - definitely a situation for an attorney.
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Why? Do you think the OP is not capable or reading?
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do after shutting off the water is sell the property, given that he's manifestly not mentally prepared to manage it.
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 20:57:01 -0400, "olaf"

My thoughts exactly. A worse scenario will be a meth lab. Then your house becomes condemned as uninhabitable. Why would any tenant be that "private?" Any concerns about privacy would have been resolved by their being present when you inspect.
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PaPaPeng wrote:

I don't think it is a grow or meth lab. I think they don't want me to fix it out of spite because it is costing me money and I am kicking them out.
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By all means contact a lawyer and have cops cary out order. Around here breaking down a door or forcing entry will get you shot and under our law the shooter will walk.
On 16 Oct 2005 16:14:05 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com"

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<uriah> says...

There's no need to get a lawyer involved for a landlord to gain access to their own property to make repairs.

If he's the landlord, he has every right to have a key to the place. Forced entry shouldn't be required.
As others have said, check the rental/lease agreement and the local landlord/tenant laws. It's not unreasonable for a landlord to gain access to their property to make repairs, especially if those repairs are to protect the integrity of the building.
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The tenants are apparently hostile, and without a lawyer, he can't get the police to intervene. He needs a lawyer.

Okay, YOU gain entry and fix the plumbing for him, then! Please let us know how you make out.

"Reasonable" is not part of this particular situation.
Captain Joe Redcloud
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wrote:

He may have a right to a key, but he doesn't have a key. Let him stick his right in the keyhole and open the door.

Shouldn't be is not the same as "is".

You're right. It's not unreasonable.

BTW, after the super of my building left and the next super only lasted two days, I changed my locks or something and never gave a key to the super or the landlord again. Ten more years.
I didn't know the new super, the landlord didn't know him well, and there was no reason I should trust him. I had three roommates and someone was usually home. But even if I were alone, I wouldn't have given them a key anymore. If they really needed to get in, they could drill the lock, but they never needed to.
Hmm. I don't remember the details, but I have a vague recollection of going to the first super, whom I liked (but that doesn't mean he was honest) or the second super the night before he left and asking for my key back. He gave it to me.
In the next 10 years no one from the landlord ever asked for a key. (When roommates left on bad terms (once or twice out of about 10 or 12 roommates I had) I changed the locks also.)
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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Send them a certified letter that the water will be turned off at a certain date "to prevent further damage" unless they allow repairs to be made. Greg
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Illegal!
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when it is leaking severely and possibly causing damage to the building. Second, I never said to shut off the water. I just said to send them a letter that states that you will.Two different deals completely! Greg
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"First, I find it hard to believe you are not allowed to shut off the water when it is leaking severely and possibly causing damage to the building. "
Of course it's hard to believe, because it's not true. You can't shut off utilities to force people to move, but you most certainly can shut them off if there is a legitimate emergency. And you most certainly can when there is a serious leak that you're trying to fix, but the tenent refuses you access to do it.
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I realize you can not shut off the utilities just to piss off the tenant, but I think a water leak would be a good reason to. Greg
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CRIMINENTLY!
It works something like this.
YOU go by YOUR property. YOU notice a leak in the pipes. YOU attempt to rectify situation, but are barred by the tenant from doing so. YOU turn off the water because the tenant has denied YOU access to YOUR premises.
FAST FORWARD
Now ball is in tenant's court. They must go to authorities and make complaint that the property is uninhabitable. YOU have proof that YOU attempted to make repairs, but were barred illegally from YOUR own property.
It's your property, man. Start acting like it.
STeve
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Depends on your state's laws. As far as I know most have a 24-hour advance notification requirement, which is waived if a necessary repair is endangering life or property.
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Mike Foss wrote:

Greetings,
In this case I gave them 24 hours notice. When I came to the door they had a chain on it. I called the police which arrived and talked to the tenant but said it was a civil matter and that they could not do anything. Before saying that it was a civil matter they said that they didn't really know the laws in this situation.
Hope this helps, William
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