tenant handyman rate

My tenant and I are considering some projects that he would complete -- laminate/tile kitchen flooring, countertops (Formica) and fixtures.
In exchange for rent, what's a good hourly rate to consider?
flooring -- 250 sq feet countertop -- 200" total in 3 parts fixtures - kitchen sink/faucet
I'm mostly looking for labor estimates, but if anyone has thoughts on materials, chime in.
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How much does a car cost?
R
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Not at all sure this is a good idea. I'd definitely want to see work he's done before. It's not like cutting grass. Screw up a countertop or floor and you've got big problems.
And assuming I did do it, unless it was someone I had experience with on other jobs or that I was there watching, I'd want to establish a fixed cost for the labor upfront, not leave the meter running....
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?

Same rate any handyman would charge. Usually $20 to $40 an hour depending on location.
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I'll second $20-40. If I had a renter I could count on to do all that, right, I'd be generous. -----
- gpsman
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On 1/27/2011 10:30 AM, woodchuck wrote:

As a landlord myself, I would definitely NOT do an hourly thing. It would be a flat fee, credited only upon PROPER completion. Make sure your expectations are spelled out in advance and agreed upon in writing.
--
Steve Barker
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woodchuck wrote:

What does he earn at his job? Pay at least that.
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dadiOH
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What does that have to do with it? If the guy is unemployed do you pay him nothing? If he's a male model and earns $1000/day do you cough up the dough?
The only things to consider is whether the guy is qualified to do the work and how much a pro would charge. Doing an hourly thing could be smart or flipping stupid, depending.
The OP doesn't seem to realize that there is a much steeper downside than the upside to the situation. Say the guy gets hurt, damages something in the house, damages materials he's installing and they have to be replaced, etc., etc.
The only way it could be a win-win situation is looking at it after the fact.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

No, but he used to earn something.

If he can earn $1000 a day he wouldn't be interested in doing handyman work.

But he *isn't* a pro.

Agreed.
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Appreciate all the feedback.
I was looking for a "rate" to use a guage for estimating the work. Any agreement would be fixed pricing. Example -- laying kitchen laminate flooring -- figuring about 20 hours x 30/hr = 600. I pay materials. I'm pretty sure that is enough time compared to hiring someone to do it. In fact, I could get estimates and then work with the tenant. So if he comes back with an estimate of $1200, well, then I'm not sure this is going to work out. If he says 750, then we are in the ball park and I can start to list out specifics like remove quarter round, repaint existing baseboard, lay floor, paint and replace quarter round, etc.
I'd exect to have the work done, insepected, issues resolved, and then credit towards rent. He's already done some odd jobs -- recaulk a tub, install a toilet rebuild kit -- so I'd like to compensate as a matter of good gesture. The water heater regulator went out -- he installed the warranty part -- I think I paid $75. Caulk a tub, I'm estimating 1 hour, install rebuild kit -- 1 hour. The toilet one is kinda hard to sort out -- it might have been better for me to upgrade the entire toilet.
The real issue is we are upside down on this already -- he's a month behind on rent and now wanting to barter. I am looking to list the property this spring, so if he can do a few minor upgrades, it probably helps me out.
There is a leaky shower -- he believes to be the diverter valve, so that might be a good 1st run. Requires opening up a closet wall to get to the valve, replacing and then patching it all back up. Of course situations like that always can run into new discoveries.
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My point is that what the tenant typically does for income has no bearing whatsoever on figuring what to pay the guy. It's immaterial.

Yes, I understood that part. The question is - is there enough of cost savings between the tenant doing the work vs. a pro doing it to make the added risk and liability worth it.

Okay, the motion carries. ;)
R
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I pay my resident handyman $25 per hour for work above common maintenance in addition to a one bedroom apartment with all bills paid. He's damn good.
Steve
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With 35 years in the rental business I will offer that the deals seldom work out without at least one party being unhappy.
If you feel the need to proceed it should be "by the job", labor only. Let him price it and you agree or disagree. Hourly is an invitation to all kinds of problems.
Good luck and best wishes whatever you choose.
Colbyt
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On 1/27/2011 8:02 PM, Colbyt wrote:

I mostly agree, but with the added question, are these 'needed repairs' or 'upgrades'? If the latter, telling him you won't jack the rent till he leaves, should count for something.
The few times my family found themselves renting out property, any changes were at request of tenant. If we had a warm fuzzy about their skill set, deal was materials plus incidental expenses would be deducted from the rent. Incidental expenses included them hiring pro installation. (Small towns, nobody worried about only working for the actual owner.)
Note that ya still gotta pay taxes on the imputed rent- you simply got labor instead of part of the cash. IRS probably wants it documented as barter labor, but if you mark it down as rent paid in full that month, odds are nobody will ever question it.
--
aem sends...

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woodchuck wrote:

Common: You supply the materials, he supplies the labor.
After the project, it's like prostitution: You've got it, he uses it, you've still got it.
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I agree with many others on this one. Agree on a fair price for the job at the start. When he's done inspect it and then deduct it form the rent. Start with something smaller and if it doesn't work out it won't be painful and you can chalk it up as a learning experience.
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