Temporary Shine on Unfinished Hardwood?

Hello,
I have old, unfinished hardwood floors in one section of my house. I don't have the time (or know how) to finish them permenently so I was wondering if there was something I could "mop" on the floors to make them look a little nicer. Will a Murphey's Oil Soap or something like it help?
Any thoughts?
If you are asking why I don't just finish them...I have friends coming in from out of town next week and don't have time to finish them myself or hire anyone.
Thanks!
Manta
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I bought a very good liquid floor polish at Lowes. Just mop it on with a sponge mop. It would also be easy to clean when you do finish your floors.

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Thanks W. Well. Do you remember the name of the product? Do you recall it having any harmful fumes or is it as easy as it sounds? Finally, how long does it last?
Manta
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However... that polish may very well prevent the varnish from adhering to the wood when he does finish the floors. Bad idea.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Corporate Monkey wrote:

You can mop on a sanding sealer. It's usually the first step in refinishing after the floor has been sanded. I think it would be preferable to oil soap if you're going to be sanding and refinishing later on.
R
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Corporate Monkey wrote:

I suggest you not use a wax or a polish. The sanding sealer sounded like a good idea.
If you use a wax of polish, you are going to have problems when it comes to to finish the floors as you will need to remove that stuff before applying a real finish and after putting it on bare wood that is not going to be easy.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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non-silicone-bearing wax isn't going to cause any trouble if an oil-based varnish is applied after sanding.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I haven't used it recently, but Mop-N-Glo always did a great job for me. It really shined my parquet flooring. I don't know what it contains though.
Barbara
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Almost anything you put on there runs the risk of preventing adhesion of the varnish, once you *do* have them permanently finished. The floor polish suggested by another poster is a particularly bad idea, as many polishes contain silicone, which is almost guaranteed to cause problems with applying a finish later.
One thing that *won't* cause problems with later use of *oil*-based varnish is plain old Johnson's Paste Wax.
I think your best bet is to leave it alone until you can get a professional floor refinishing company in there.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Monkey says...

??!?
Here's the inexpensive fix that promises not to compromise any future plans for the floors:
Tell your friends "look at these wonderful old hardwood floors! Once I get a chance, I plan to...."
Or are these "friends" really your mother in law? ;-)
Cheers, Banty
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Pour used transmission fuild (the red type) on and wipe off the excess. After sanding it gives a great redwood finish and will look great till then. It is the secret that most floor layers and carpenters charge thousands for and would hate to see this trade secret leaked. Completely non toxic and (if used) free for the taking at any tranny shop. Now watch the nervous professionals post away!
-- Troweller^nospam^@canada.com
Remove the obvious to reply. Experienced and reliable Concrete Finishing and Synthetic Stucco application in the GTA.
Corporate

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If the floors are sanded and ready for a finish you could just mop on some water based poly for floors. It dries in about an hour, noes not smell and is very easy to apply. You apply it with a mop. (lambswool applicator actually)
You could do the first coat then sand lightly after your friends leave. Took me less than 1 hour to apply to 500 sq feet IIRC.
I have been racking my brain for the brand product I used. I bought it from a company that rented me my sander. Weldwood sticks in my head but I'm pretty sure that's not correct, weldwood is a glue.
Varithane is one brand, Home cheapo has their own brand and a google search will turn up many more.
Do this google search for some options... http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q=water+based+polyurethane+wood+floor+finish+quick+dry&spell=1
Ahh, while looking some more I remembered, I used something called Fabulon at my old house. Worked great for me. YMMV (Your mileage may vary). I couldn't find too much about Fabulon on the web. Could now be called Duraseal? Not too sure. I would think any of the quick dry, mop down urethanes would be your best solution given your circumstances.
DO NOT use oil soap or anything like that.
Actually, even if they have NOT been sanded yet, I think I would still just mop some water based poly on. Its better than nothing and will come up when you do sand.
Good luck, let us know what you do!

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