Temporary roof repair after Wilma advise

My barrel tiled roof was damaged by Wilma. Basically many tiles along the ridge of the roof were either broken, missing or cracked. Here is a picture of one side of the ridge:
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-10/1090906/wilma_roof_ridge1.jpg
A close up view:
http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-10/1090906/wilma_roof_ridge2.jpg
The tiles are ten years old, and I don't know if I should replace the entire roof or just get things fixed.
Getting a roofer to come by to take a look will take weeks, no one is answering phone calls now, and everyone needs a roofer to fix their damaged roof. I also need an insurance adjuster to come take a look, but I just don't think what I had will exceed the $10000 deductable I have for windstorm...I had roof damage and fence was blown away.
Last time I spoke to someone to repair my roof, he told me my tiles have been discontinued and I was lucky I had two pieces left. What will they do if there is no longer any replacement tiles?
Should I put some tarp on my ridge in the mean time in case it rains? How would I attach the tarp? Duct tape?
Thanks for any advise,
MC
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miamicuse wrote:

With tile roofs the primary waterproofing is provided by the underlayment. It looks like your ridge tiles blew off because they were mortared in place - a common failure when the mortar is incorrectly applied during initial installlation. If your underlayment is in good shape (not cracked or torn) then you don't need to do anything for now. Since the underlayment will degrade with long term exposure to the sun replacing the ridge tiles promptly would be a good idea - this time use an adhesive attachment such as PolyPro or even RT-600 (assuming the mortar pads are still in place). If you replace all the ridge tiles it probably won't be necessary to get an exact color match.
http://www.polyfoam.cc/products/roof/stormcheck.html http://www.osiproseries.com/adhesives/products/rt-600-roof-tile-adhesive /
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miamicuse wrote:

A new tile roof done to HVHZ standards costs about $500 a square (100 square feet), so don't underestimate the potential cost.
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Some breakage of tile is normal wear and tear. After all the stuff is a close kin to pottery. Walking on the roof can and will damage the tiles. Especially if I were to do it ~300 lbs. If the field is free of cracked tiles then I would consider just replacing the cap. Tile should last 25-40 years. Do you have the original warrantee? They will not replace the caps but the cracked tiles might be replaced.
Preventing water from entry to the home is always a good idea. Duct tape is not the choice I would use. A tarp and some strechies is what I would use.
Replacement might be another roof.
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SQLit wrote:

Nowadays the most common roof tile is made out of concrete, not clay.
In Florida concrete roof tile is required to be tested to withstand several hundred psi, and if properly installed (using a foam-in-place paddy system) you can walk on these tiles without damage. I haven't tested this myself but I've had 275 lb roofers walk all over my roof during and after installation without breakage.
This is not true of older concrete tiles such as 'Duntex', a crummy Florida and Texas tile that will disintegrate if a basketball is dropped on it!
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I can walk on mine OK. My problem is getting up there. I am real nervous on a ladder, no kidding. My wife even laugh at me when I climb on a ladder.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 18:33:37 -0500, "miamicuse"

Make your wife fix the roof. Would serve her right.
But seriously, my condolences. I have two friends who live in Tamarac. I think they are condos so no responsibility for the roof, but tiles flew off, breaking the windshields of two family members visiting one of their next-door neighbors. Her car was in the garage, but it's a one car gararage.
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 11:46:21 -0500, "miamicuse"

$10.000 deductible? I think you need a new insurance company !!!!
As for the tarp. Tie ropes to the holes, run them down the roof to the rain gutters or put eyelets in the overhang and eaves. Tie ropes to that or use bungee cords on the ends of the ropes. The eyelets will later unscrew and a little caulk will fill the holes.
What is stopping YOU from replacing the bad tiles if you can not get a roofer?
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

You obviously don't live in coastal Florida. 2% or 5% deductibles for windstorm damage are common here.
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Actually this is not possible. Many insurance companies no longer take policies in south Florida. You are lucky if you can find ONE to insure you, there are no real choices out there. If you make a claim or two, they drop you. If I reduce my deductable to $5000, my rates probably will double. Next year I am looking at a substantial increase, and with Wilma, even more. Even if my repair bill is $10000 I am still not sure I will risk my rate by filing a claim. South Florida is very different from rest of the country.

Well, I do a lot of stuff, but climbing on a ladder to the roof is something I cannot do, my knees get weak when I get up the ladder. I am OK once I am on the roof, but I have a real phobia when I am on the ladder about to set foot on the roof and also when I get off from it. I can't explain it, but it's true. Some of it has to do with the Krause ladder I have (very skinny), but most of it is me (psychological), plus having two neighbors who fell off their ladder last year does not inspire any confidence.

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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 18:32:13 -0500, "miamicuse"

Thank God I dont live there if that is the case !!!! Insurance companies are all ripoffs anyhow. I bet you still pay out the ass for coverage.

tarp it for you.
Good Luck
Mark
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On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 18:32:13 -0500, "miamicuse"

I don't have a tremendous fear, but getting off and on the ladder are definitely the worst parts. Much easier however if the ladder extends 3 or 4 feet above the edge of the roof.
Mine just barely passed the gutter the first year I was here and had to install a roof fan. I planned ahead and carried everything up in one shot. I was sitting sideways, near the top. I cut the shingles and the wood, and wanted to install the fan, but it seemed I hadn't brought it up with me. I finally found it right behind me. I had been too scared to turn more than 70 degrees. So I couldn't see it.
But I got the job done, and done well.
But the next day, I was sore all over, even though nothing was heavy or required force. It was one big isometric exercise, sitting so still with all my muscles tense, for fear I'd relax and roll off.

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I also have Wilma cap damage - perhaps 10-15 tiles total. Some fell off (one went through my screen enclosure and busted on the floor). Most are still up there.
If I can get up there (2nd story) - somewhere I read to walk the tiles horizontally, putting weight on the end of the tiles to prevent cracking.
Then all I have to do is adhesive the tiles? Sounds fairly easy, though a bit scary.
Gary
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It may just be our wind code but tile in Florida has 2 screws in it, along with the bedding.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The attachment method (mortar, one part adhesive, two part adhesive, nails, screws...with or without battens) for tile in Florida depends on the type of tile, the slope of the roof, the manufacturer's design and installation instructions, and the rated wind load - the latter of which varies by location within the state.
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garz wrote:

Yes, that is correct. Use RT-600 as the adhesive
Helpful instructions: To avoid breaking tiles, there are certain methods of traversing the roof that may minimize damage. Typically, it is recommended to step at the bottom three inches of the installed tile. This is the portion of the tile that is supported by the lapped tile beneath it and the weight is then transferred through it to the deck below. Orient your feet in a direction parallel with the ridge and try to distribute your weight evenly and walk as softly as possible. On S shaped tiles, it is recommended for you to distribute your weight with the heel and toe on the high points of adjacent tiles.
Another option that proves helpful, particularly when a work task may distract you, is to use walk pads to distribute weight over a larger area you may be working on.
Pads may be fabricated in a number of ways but are typically made from sheets of plywood cut into 2' X 2' sections. The underside of these pads can then be fitted with softer material such as carpet or rigid foam that willhelp spread the weight and prevent slippage.
It is also recommended to stay away from hips or valleys to avoid breaking specially cut tiles that would be more difficult to replace. The exception to this would be in situations where the hips and ridges are attached by being bedded in either mortar or foam, in which case, they may be preferred walking paths.
Valleys can also be ideal access paths, if the tiles are cut away from the center of the valley wide enough to allow foot traffic on the valley flashing instead of the tile. Take special care when walking on valley flashing, as the metal can be slippery.
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What town are you in? E-mail me, I may have somone who can tarp it for you. If its just the ridge caps I would just replace them with whatever tiles look closest. they do not need to be an exact match to the originals, just any ole gray ridge should look fine. Don't use duck tape or duct tape. yes tarp it. FEMA also has a tarp program call 1-888-ROOF-BLU or some such thing but I'm typicly loath to involve the government in my personal affairs.
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I am in Hollywood/Dania Florida. If you know someone please email me it would be greatly appreciated. I called 1-888-ROOF-BLU it's operated by the Corp of Engineers and they told me they only will work in Shingle roof not tiled roof.
MC

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miamicuse wrote:

That's because the tarps are nailed in place - you obviously can't do that with a tile roof.
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