Temporary plumbing fix

I need to move the water softener out of the basement to allow for some drain tile work to be done, and am not sure how to deal with the plumbing for this. Essentially I think I need to join the in and out pipes for a couple of days so I can move the softener upstairs temporarily. I looked at where the copper pipes go into the softener - they attach to a F shaped plastic fitting at the back, with two plastic pipes going into the machine, and at one end there is what looks like a plunger (like a syringe) protruding. Do I just need to disconnect the copper pipes and add something between them to create the circuit (obviously we need water during this process)? If so, what should I use? Is it possible to get some form of flexible hose for this pupose, or do I need to create a u-shaped copper fitting?
Any ideas gratefully received.
Mat
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If it does not already have one, add a bypass. That way anytime you need to isolate it or remove it, you can do so.
Mat and Suzy wrote:

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Joseph E. Meehan

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Why don't people on this group answer the question any more, but still feel the need to give a reply?
I figured this one out with the help of a plumber friend - you just need to push in the plunger on the plastic fitting and then remove the fitting from the softener by first removing the c-shaped clips that hold it on the housing. The plastic fitting then stays on the pipes and short circuits the water circuit.
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Mat and Suzy wrote:

Hopefully to offer some useful advice. Often the questions not asked are more important than the question asked. For example, what is the correct answer to someone who asks if pouring acid down a pipe will clean a clog? Well the simple answer is " probably yes." The problem is it will also eat the h*)) out of the pipe. So maybe it would be better to offer the advice that it will damage the pipe and it should not be tried.
Advice can be ignored if it does not apply. Many times it will not apply as the original poster already knows that, but often it can be helpful.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Many water softners are different and are installed different. It's been awhile since I've installed them (used to be a plumber), but I remember about 3 different ways to hook them up. So it's not a particularly easy question to answer, without seeing the installation with your own eyes. And honestly, if I had described it to you...and you misunderstood...and pulled those C clips before the bypass was actuated...well....you'd have a flood on your hands in a hurry. What if the valve was already in "bypass" mode and you pushed it the other way and then tried to remove those clips? Again, instant flood.
What you are describing, is a "built in by-pass" on the softner. It's essentially a bypass valve, that comes with the softner and is installed as part of the installation process. Your plumber friend was exactly right. You should be good to go. And the poster did answer your question, by saying:

But to answer your question one step further....
Let's say, that you wanted to REPLACE that water softner. Chances are fairly good, that you will have to install a new bypass valve (that comes with the softner installation kit) and you'll have to shut the water off to the whole house again. And that may be fine, if the installation won't take long. But if you had a REAL bypass on there (made with REAL valves), you could take as long as you like to remove the softner and not disrupt the water supply in the house.
Furthermore...did you look closely at the bypass valuve you used? It's plastic, as I recall and not particularly sturdy. It might work...but it might not either. Maybe it was overkill, but I always installed a REAL bypass valve, even if the softner came with it's own. Those plastic things never impressed me much.
I'm glad you got your problem solved. And it worked great for you. But somebody else with the same problem may not be so lucky.
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