temporary patch for asphalt shingles

Grrr- I knew it was getting close & had planned on doing it in 3-4 years, but mother nature says I need to do my roof sooner.
A small section, less than 2 squares total, has started to leak & it looks like it is all pretty weak along the eaves end. I don't see any holes, but several shingles are cracked. It is in a closed in ceiling so finding the exact leak isn't feasible.
I have been looking at options for the whole roof [maybe 10 squares] and hate to jump into something now that I'll want to change when I do the whole thing next year. [I'm in NY & winter is close & I've just got too many irons in the fire right now.] I'm considering some of the metal shingles. If I use them on the main roof, I'll want to do this porch, too as it is right at the entrance of the house.
So I want to throw a 6-7 month patch on some 30 year old asphalt shingles.
I imagine there are good tars that will go on in 50 degree weather and hold up for the winter. Any suggestions?
Or a better approach that will minimize wasted money & time?
Thanks- Jim
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You can damage a lot of wood letting a leak go for a year. Covering the area with a heavy tarp might work.
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If appearance does not matter any of the roll on fiberated mobile home roof sealers will buy you a year or two. KoolSeal is the top of the line product but Lowes sells a generic for about half the price. Pour it on and spread with a broom. May need to repeat over shingles. Buy a 5 gallon bucket for two square, cheaper the 3 singles if you can even find them.
--
Colbyt
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-snip-

Thanks- I think that's the direction I'm headed. Rain should stop by tomorrow. Saturday it should be dry.
The worse it looks the more likely I am to get to the whole roof right away next spring.
Jim
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On 10/6/2010 6:39 PM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Bite the bullet and pay to get it changed out now. They'll be in and out in a week, and come the January blizzards, you will be dry and happy. Nothing is more permanent than a temporary repair, and there will always be some reason why you have to put it off. On a 30 year old roof, if that section has failed, other sections are not far behind. I know you wanna do it yourself and save money, but what is your time worth? And how much income will you lose if you have to take off work and deal with the next leak when the snow is flying?
--
aem sends...

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-snip-

I'd do that if I knew what I wanted for the whole roof. I just don't want rush a decision now that I'll just have to do again in the spring. I might go with metal shingles, or just stick with asphalt-- and have no idea what style or even color I'll go with if I do asphalt again.

The blizzards aren't bad-- it is those thaws in between that wreak havoc. This has a south exposure so ice dams aren't usually a problem.

My boss lets me take all the time I want for home repairs & improvements. Actually that's why I'm retired and she's still working.<g>
Jim
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One problem that you will have is not only trying to fix the existing leaks, but with a 30 YEAR OLD roof, fixing all the new leaks created walking around. I've seen how brittle they get in 20 years. Can't imagine 30.
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I too would bite the bullet and re-shingle. Failing that, a roof repair company should be able to do a torch-on patch over the affected area. This will get you thru the winter.
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-snip-

It's actually in pretty good shape. Southern exposure - but shaded in the summer. 95% of the stones are still on the shingles- even where another section of the roof drops rain on it. No wind to speak of here as we're in a bit of a gully. All the tabs are flat and none are missing. If some ice guard had been installed back in the day, I'd probably get a few more years out of it.
Good news is I don't have to get on it. It is long and narrow-- only 10' deep at its deepest. And the eaves are only 8' off the ground, so I can 'lean and reach' off a step ladder for that section. The rest is only 7' deep. The worst of it seems to be the first few courses, so I'll be able to give them a good layer easily from the ladder.
Jim
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How about just ripping the roof and putting down Ice Guard (or approved equal) over the whole roof? In the Spring you'll be ready to go.
R
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-snip-

I thought about that for a bit-- but you know how that stuff goes. . . One day to do the job. . . but then you get it off and decide to replace some plywood-- notice a 2x that needs replacing. . . mess up some flashing. . . By then I'm rushing because I've got too many other projects going right now.
I decided I'll trust the $50 tar and 3-4 hours invested now so I can leisurely decide what I want on the whole roof and hire the works out next spring. I'm probably not going to do the main roof-- it is 2 1/2 stories up and too steep to walk on.
Jim
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wrote:

Noooooo!? Really? That stuff really happens to you? :-)

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wrote:

That's really a coincidence. The same thing happens when I get near anything.
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Hey Jim. The tar is a waste of time, money and effort. Rip the roof now, see what you're up against, repair any sheathing that needs it, then cover it up with self-adhesive self-sealing underlayment. Use the granulated stuff and it'll get you through the winter no problem. Come the spring you can just start roofing.
R
PS I apparently have some posting gremlins munching my posts. So let me know if this doesn't come through. ;)
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