Temporary Natural Gas line.

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It just seems wrong to talk about 40' of exposed gas line protected from sun and cars by hay bales.
I seriously doubt that that is compliant in any jurisdiction.
However, you've raised my curiosity. What is the layout of this setup such that cars would normally be driving around in the area that the tubing will be run? What type of traffic will you be impeding with the hay bales?
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I'm guessing his plot is on the other side of county road 27, the four lane main feeder from Plotzville where he lives, to Spencertown, where the Agway is. Not more than a couple thousand cars a day. Sound about right?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

It just seems wrong to talk about 40' of exposed gas line protected from sun and cars by hay bales.
I seriously doubt that that is compliant in any jurisdiction.
However, you've raised my curiosity. What is the layout of this setup such that cars would normally be driving around in the area that the tubing will be run? What type of traffic will you be impeding with the hay bales?
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On 12/20/2011 9:03 PM, JIMMIE wrote:

given the input you have here, i'd use soft copper and run it through some pvc to protect it. You'll get flamed for the pex, but it would work.
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JIMMIE wrote:

No sense going overboard.
A hunk of 3/8" plastic tubing should work swell. Gas pressure is measured in OUNCES/sq ft. Put some hay bales on top and you're good to go.
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IIRC, isn't regulated propane pressure about 3 PSI? Natural gas is 11 inches water column, which is not a lot of pressure.
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On 12/22/2011 7:22 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

ERRRRRRR! 11 inches water column is required for some high BTU usage equipment like NG powered gensets. If I remember correctly, most appliances run on 5-8 inches water column which is why gas lines are usually 3/4" and 1". Around here you can get 2 lb pressure service from the gas company and it's indicated by a red face on the gas meter. I like it because I can run 3/8" lines to everything but a regulator is needed for each appliance. I think it's 11" WC, 1/3 lb for propane used in homes, 7 inches WC = around 1/4 PSI. Imagine the pressure of your breath when you blow on the back of your hand and that's like 8 inches WC. 1 PSI = 27.5 inches WC. I have the meters to measure those low pressures, that's why you see little 1/8 npt threaded pipe plugs all over gas equipment so the pressures can be checked and adjusted. One thing a lot of folks don't know is that most gas control valves will lock out if the gas pressure is too high so it's always best to make sure of your gas pressure. ^_^
TDD
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Thanks. Some how, I'm remembering 3.5 inches WC for furnaces. After the gas valve, that is. I've seen the 1/8 inch pipe plugs on various equipment. Natural gas meters, etc.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
ERRRRRRR! 11 inches water column is required for some high BTU usage equipment like NG powered gensets. If I remember correctly, most appliances run on 5-8 inches water column which is why gas lines are usually 3/4" and 1". Around here you can get 2 lb pressure service from the gas company and it's indicated by a red face on the gas meter. I like it because I can run 3/8" lines to everything but a regulator is needed for each appliance. I think it's 11" WC, 1/3 lb for propane used in homes, 7 inches WC = around 1/4 PSI. Imagine the pressure of your breath when you blow on the back of your hand and that's like 8 inches WC. 1 PSI = 27.5 inches WC. I have the meters to measure those low pressures, that's why you see little 1/8 npt threaded pipe plugs all over gas equipment so the pressures can be checked and adjusted. One thing a lot of folks don't know is that most gas control valves will lock out if the gas pressure is too high so it's always best to make sure of your gas pressure. ^_^
TDD
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JIMMIE wrote:

Down the street a high dollar RV burned to the ground when it caught fire. That thing was a tinder box on wheels. Anyway since you asked, you probably have a garden hose that isn't being used this time of year....., why not just use that? It will probably work just fine if it doesn't leak and blow something up and if worse comes to worse you will have the hose already strung out, ready to connect to the water line to put out the fire.. Whatever you do remember you will have to bleed the air for a while before the gas gets to the end of the line. Just curious, is this for a mother-in-law?
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