Telephones ringing

The telephone circuit in my home has two phone jacks:
Jack #1 serves a Panasonic KX-TG5210 5.8 GHz Cordless Phone and a hard- wire AT&T Trimline phone.
Jack #2 serves a hard-wired AT&T Trimline phone.
When an incoming call arrives:
only one phone rings or only two phones ring. or the loudness of the ringing varies from phone to phone.
How do I get all phones to ring and to ring loudly?
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gary wrote:

Not enough information to provide a cogent answer. Is your home's location urban, suburban, or rural? Is your telephone service provided over copper wires, coaxial cable, fiber optic filament, or some other medium. Is all of the telephone wiring in the home of the same age and type?
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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My home is in the city of Riverside, California. The phone service is via copper wires (about 35 years old).
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gary wrote:

Look at the bottom of each device for the REN, add all the rens for line 1 and for line 2. The phone office has a max REN load of 5.0, other sources may lower, 3.0 or even 1.0 .
If you exceed the max allowed, some or all devices won't ring or work. Disconnect a few to get under the max limit, generally turning the ringer "off" does not change the load.
1 Ringer Equivalent Number is the equivalent load of the standard single line 1960's desk telephone (model 500 or 2500).
-- larry/dallas
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Line 1 (Jack #1): Panasonic Cordless Phone: .1B AT&T Trimline phone: .4A and .7B HAC
Line 2 (Jack #2): AT&T Trimline phone: .4A and .7B HAC
(Both Trimline phones are about 8 years old; the Panasonic Cordless is about 3 years old).
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There's not enough info here and the problem is strange, but I were guessing (and I am) I would be that Jack #1 has a splitter for the two phones. 1 phone is plugged in each side. I but it moves slightly back and forth and somehow's that's causing your problem.
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In article

A modern Central Office switch provides current sufficient to ring approximately 5 of the old-style desk phones (REN 5). This capability diminishes as the distance to the station (home) increases. Generally, the switch is capable of ringing MANY more modern "tone" ringers at the same distance. The R.E.N. (Ringer Equivalence Number) on modern, consumer-grade telephone equipment can be, or can become, notoriously inaccurate.
Assuming all wiring is in good condition with proper connections, if the telephones otherwise work properly, you still may have a defective set. It is possible than an otherwise properly working telephone may be "dragging down" the other ringers.
With all ringers set to HIGH, leave one set unplugged and see what happens. If the trouble persists, reconnect that phone and unplug a different set. If the trouble persists, reconnect that phone and unplug the last set. Lather, rinse, repeat. :)
You could try a NEW telephone and, using the procedure above, swap-out each existing set, one-at-a-time, with the new set then see what happens. If the trouble persists, you would do well to trouble shoot the inside wiring and jacks. If no trouble is found you can always request a service call from your provider. Good luck.
--
:)
JR

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