Telephone Wiring Mystery

Page 3 of 4  
wrote:

FET. The ringer itself runs off the wall wart or the battery.

The old system always had enough juice to run a few phones but the central office could tell how many bells you had connected if they looked. Back in the old "illegal phone" days people did not want them to know about the extra phone they stole. Ma Bell did not sell phones, they only rented them. Until the late 70s decision against ATT, it was a breach of contract to hook anything to a phone line without renting a DDA coupler from Ma.
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On 01/01/2013 11:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

OK. I'm just stating the fact that it couldn't be exactly zero.

I wish I still had one of those phones. The ones you could get in any color you wanted as long as that was black.
I suppose most young people wouldn't know what to do with the dial.
Actually, my grandmother had a white one. The one that was around where she worked with porcelain and the (white) slip dripped on it.

IIRC, those things were really expensive. I don't quite remember when they were required. I remember when they (phone companies) SAID they were required and it was common to ignore the rule.
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wrote:

"0.0" is not exactly zero. It is less than 0.05, though.

I remember my grandmother saying the same sort of thing when she was forced to get her first dial telephone.

Sure, hams got around them for years. IIRC, there was a specific exemption for them (relay).
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On 01/01/2013 04:24 PM, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

True. It still looked like zero.
[snip]
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wrote:

A FET front end is micro amps. There is more incidental load on a POTS line from damp insulation along the way.
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wrote:

I still have 2 rotary dial phones here. The one in the garage was the original one from the phone company with my number in the dial. The other is a pay phone out in the tiki bar. My grand kids may not even know it is a phone.
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I had that problem at someone's house, the phone is "over there on the table" and I simply could not find it. Cordless thing, on a charge stand. Who'd have known?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I still have 2 rotary dial phones here. The one in the garage was the original one from the phone company with my number in the dial. The other is a pay phone out in the tiki bar. My grand kids may not even know it is a phone.
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On 1/1/2013 9:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Back in the 90's I did some work for a nice lady and her mother when I noticed they had a mint condition 1940 model rotary dial phone from Ma Bell. I asked them about it and where they had come up with such a nice old phone. It turned out to be the original phone they had obtained and were still paying a lease on to BellSouth. The nice lady was 73 and her mother was 100 years old. ^_^
TDD
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On Tue, 01 Jan 2013 12:06:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Did they really care? During the 60s I ran hundreds (thousands?) of ham radio phone patches using home brew equipment attached to the phone lines. Stateside we hams often CQed (called) other hams in cities that had relatives and used their phone patches to beat Ma Bell out of long distance charges. I also ran phone patches for service people overseas, mostly Viet Nam. I think the phone company was well aware but didn't really care unless we took down a line. They certainly never bothered me.
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not paying THEM for it.
Money-grabbers.
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It mostly applied to commercial installations. IBM designed and built a better modem than the Bell unit (faster and more reliable) but they were at a disadvantage because the customer still had to rent the coupler.
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In 1969 I troubleshot a DEC modem that was in a rack, made from TTL logic. That was a production model with the PDP-8I series. I was a real data communication technician, whoopee. Still used a coupler.
Greg
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After all these years, I just realized the ironic situation. Out of tech school I was offered two jobs. One at DEC, and one at ATT. I was destined to work on phone lines! That didn't last long, I got drafted.
Greg
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On 1/1/2013 11:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I've removed many an abandoned in place gear like that from backboards in phone rooms in older office buildings. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

That is the real test
You got it right.
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On 12/30/2012 7:56 PM, croy wrote:

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On 12/30/2012 03:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

How do you get 4? If you had flat cable, there would be only 2 ways. With individual wires it's 4! (4*3*2*1 = 24). 6! (6*5*4*3*2*1 = 720) for 6-wire cable.

I suppose they decided it'd cost too much to include a bridge rectifier.

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wrote:

Or a diode or two are blown. That happened to an old (PCMCIA) modem of mine. Actually, it came that way. I used to carry a coupler and a reversing coupler when I traveled.
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wrote:

OK silver satin, rib up, you have tabs all up, tabs all down, one up on one end, one up on the other end. That may only be 3 electrically

In those days a bridge rectifier was selenium, not silicon and about the size of 4 saltine crackers stacked with a quarter between each of them
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On 01/01/2013 11:12 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I had to read that a few times, but I think I understand that now.
You're using flat cable (not individual wires, so that factorial stuff is out).
You mention 2 variables (the position of each plug), leading to 4 combinations. There's another variable, you could turn the cable upside-down before attaching the plugs. These variables would seem to allow only 2 different cables (straight-through or reversed). where's the third one?
BTW, I'm reminded of the "combination logic gate" I built in college. It had 8 functions: AND, OR, NAND, NOR, X-NOR, X-OR, X-NAND, X-AND. The last 2 have on useful function, but they're still there.
[snip]

I've seen those old rectifiers. If a modern rectifier cost too much, I suppose that would too.
- Mark Lloyd http://notstupid.us
"I think that naming your ignorance God and pretending that, having named it. you have converted ignorance to knowledge is a sorry approach to the unknown."
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