telephone rings at night

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Obviously you are blind to the obvious. Phonecompany cant solve it, new phones etc dont solve it. It's clear that you are experiencing paranormal phenomena. Is the ringing at the same time? If its 2-4 AM that is the prime time for spirit activity. If you dont act fast your family is in serious danger. Your denial gives the demon strength.
jerryl wrote:

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On 7 Aug 2006 14:48:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@backpacker.com wrote:

Jim is right. 2 to 4 AM is the low-rate calling period for spirits. This actually interferes with a lot of their other activities

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buy new phones!
Searcher
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wrote:

Phones need enough power to ring properly - "Ringer Equivalence Number" (REN) should be a the bottom of the phone. Add those numbers up (total of all phones), generally a home can handle five phones on the power supplied by the telecom.
Also consider some type of interference, CB radio, HAM, local AM station, wireless devices, etc.
ET phoning home?
Oren
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That's a REN of 5. Many newer phones have a REN much lower than 1.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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WoW!, this generated a lot of responses.
I'm not a telephone engineer however I am an electronic tech.
Basically a telephone rings because of the presence of a ninety volt AC signal sent out from the local toll office. You phone rings because of that voltage being present.
I suggest that Bell South connect a simple recorder to your phone line for a period of time to see the level of the "ring" voltage and time/frequency. Its easy for stay voltages to be induced into wires, that's likely what's happening in your home.
Your home (and phones) are not possesed!
I understand why the BS technician gave you his cell & home numbers. This has become his quest. I myself have often had puzzling technical problems that have stumped me. Typically when I do find the solution it's one of those "Why didn't I think of that?!".
Please let us know what the final solution is.
Handi_ca
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wrote:

Help me here, please. I've been "bit" while touching/working with a phone line in my home. Never did I imagine it being ninety volt AC. What little I know is that this a constant low-level voltage and for the phone to ring it needs a higher voltage...but 90 volt AC?

Only by more items using telecom, like DSL, DTV, modems, fax...yawn. Newer devices need less voltage than older ones.
Oren
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About 35 years ago, I measured the voltage in Chicago, and it was a lot lower than 90. I think I measured it in NYC or Baltimore and it was 90 or near there. I don't know if the difference is time or distance. But I wouldn't be surprised if the voltage varies by location.

Not yet, but the OP needs more garlic.
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wrote:

The ring voltage varies. I measured 75VAC here. Perhaps the 90VAC is to overcome losses on long lines (I'm in town).
BTW, it's 50VDC when the line is not in use.

--
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Ringing voltage is 90VAC at 20Hz and it is superimposed on about 40 volts DC. The number of phones and the line resistance will affect the voltage tha you actually read in your house.
The DC on your phone line varies. Typically, it was alway from central office -48 volts which usually runs about -52 volts. However, I recently noticed my line is around 60 volts. It is not directly connected to a central office, but instead, to an underground remote about 2 block from me. This was done in order to allow more people to get DSL. Also, when the line is active, the voltage across the line will be lower.
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wrote:

I forgot just what I measured in that last case, but it was a lot lower.
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Are you sure it is 90v AC, in my checks to build a phone ring detector many years ago, and in internet research I have found that the ringer is 70 to 90v pulsed DC not AC. The actual phone runs on 12v DC.

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I measured the voltage myself. Mostly many years ago with both voltmeter and oscilloscope, and recently with a meter, and again just now.
With no phones off-hook (all phones hung up), I just got 43 volts DC. I have heard other figures for what this is supposed to be, including 40, 42, 48 and 50 volts.
The ring signal is AC with peak-to-peak voltage 80-100 volts (more often at least 90) superimposed upon the DC. I remember clearly an oscilloscope (many years ago) showing the AC to be just strong enough for the AC peaks in the polarity direction opposite that of the DC to outweigh the DC just enough to have peak voltage in the polarity direction opposite that of the DC polarity being a few volts. The AC peaks in the same direction as the DC, combined with the DC, had a peak voltage slightly over twice the DC voltage. Makes me think 90, maybe 95 volts. Sadly, I can't remember whether the waveform was sinewave or squarewave and I can't remember whether the frequency was 20 Hz or 25, althoug several seconds with Google is making me lean towards 20 Hz sinewave.
With a phone off hook, I just found the DC voltage to be 6 volts. This will vary with make and model of phone and I was expecting more.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Tue, 8 Aug 2006 00:47:23 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

20Hz sounds right, although there may be different frequencies in use elsewhere.

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Mark Lloyd
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~100 VAC.
The actual phone runs on 12v DC.
-48-52 VDC
--
:)
JR

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On Mon, 07 Aug 2006 20:38:27 -0500, Jim Redelfs

DC voltage when phone off-hook. The audio is about 1VAC.

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wrote:

If the ringer used DC, those ring-control cords wouldn't work. Such a cord uses a full-wave rectifier.
The AC ring (75VAC here) is on the same wire as the 50VDC talk voltage. The combined voltage would vary from -25V to +125V (50+-75). Removing the AC component allows the phone to work but with no ring.

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Mark Lloyd
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I like this idea. Regardless of the bickering over what the ring voltage is *supposed* to be, a test recorder would show whether what is coming down the line in the middle of the night resembles what you are getting from the central office switch on a normal ring. If it's the same then an actual call or something with the switch is the likely culprit. If not then maybe crossed wires, induced voltage, etc.
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I can't help, but I do have the same problem on an occasional basis. I definately want to know what you find out.
Bob
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