Telephone line troubleshooting

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My telephone service is out. I have scheduled a tech to come out tommorrow, but if I can troubleshoot this myself I am willing to try. Here is the situation: The telephone tested the line remotely and did not find a problem. I do not get a dial tone on any of my phones. I have disconnected all devices from their jacks and tried reconnecting one at a time. I did not get a dial tone on any of the lines after disconnecting everything and letting the system sit for several minutes. Although I do not get a dial tone on my telephones, I still have a high speed internet connection. This strikes me as odd, but I don't know how these things work. I do not have a more modern network interface. Instead I have an entrance bridge. My multimeter indicates that I am getting about 24 volts between the green and red wires. One site I have read says this should be closer to 48 volts. Does this suggest the problem might be at the phone company? Are there any other relatively simple things that I can check? What would should I do next?
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Step one is to determine if it is the phone company or your house. To do this, go outside and find the box where the lines come in. Inside is a connector from the house to the phone company. Disconnect the house, plug in a phone to the interface, see if you have a dial tone. If yes, it is your problem and expect to pay for the service call.
You did the right thing taking all the phones off the line so th at should eliminate the problem if it is one of your devices. Have you done any work in the fast few months? I lost my phones after an unused line was cut, but the corrosion did not short it out until months later.
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I don't have a network interface box so there is no telephone plug where the wires come in. Instead there is what I believe is called a entrance bridge. I tested for voltage between the green and red wires. I got 24 volts. I am not sure whether this is within the range of voltage I should find.
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Belated, maybe, but what do you measure INSIDE the house?
David
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PaulD wrote:

Plug a corded phone into the jack in the entrance box. If it works the problem is in your house.
--

dadiOH
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 08:26:13 -0800, PaulD wrote:

If you had wiring problems one of the first things to suffer is your DSL.
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That is what I would think. Yet I still have my DSL connection. So is there a problem that would cause my telephone line not to work, but that would not prevent my internet connection from working?
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Google "DSL filter". It seems like a bad DSL filter might affect the phones but not the computer connection. Just guessing here.
Jerry
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wrote:

Hard to imagine tho. I beleive a DSL filter goes on each voice phone line, meaning each one would need to be faulty?
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Unless one is shorted internally and dragging everything else down with it?
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Not necessarily. Some of the material I googled indicated that a DSL installation might involve a splitter, right at the phone line entrance to the premises. One line in, two lines out. One of the two lines goes to the DSL modem only. The other line goes to all the voice telephone jacks. In this case, 1 filter would suffice for all the voice jacks.
Jerry
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That is the way our older installed DSL is; there is one 'filter' right after telco. line enters the house which separates the telephones from the DSL. After that it is separate wiring to the phones around the house. In newer and 'self' installations there is often a filter at each phone which prevents DSL from getting into the phones and/or they from interfering with the DSL. Don't think the OP has enough circuit analytical skills to trouble shoot the situation. And seems to be averse to totally disconnecting the telephone pair outside to prove whether it is IN or or OUTSIDE his house? It may be one side open outside, something shorting (or semi shorting) the line, defective modem, defective filter. Agree that in most cases if it's outside it's telco responsibility. If inside, these days of competition etc. customer responsibility. But he should be careful about not messing it up more for the telephone tech to have to fix!
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terry wrote:

That's the way I wired my DSL. The line come in the house; no interface box, just a lightening arrestor/terminal box. The line splits; one to a DSL filter, to the phones; the other to the DSL modem and one additional wired phone with its own DSL filter.
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On Tue, 27 Nov 2007 09:08:20 -0800 (PST), PaulD

Your DSL can and does get by on only one wire. I went through this with local VZ, with the same symptoms and the same results. First, it is a telphone problem. Work with the folks at VZ tel vice VZ broadband. Here are some of the things I was told:

Of all that I did, calling VZ and telling them that my next call was to the VA Public Utility Commission appeared to be the most effective. HOWEVER, I then,per the instructions in the phone book, emailed their consumer complaint folks. I told them that having no 911 for 5 days was totally unsat, and the next email was going to the SCC, just as they provide for in the book.
The problem, which was never disclosed. simply went away by the end of the day Oh, the next day, the phone was fine and the DSL went out BTW - I was advised that "the requirement" is that POTS be restored within 24 hours, since you have no 911 service. That is the point I hammered home to the phone company HTH starrin
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48 volts is about right if no phone or other device is "off the hook". Although I would have expected a somewhat lower number, 24 volts could indicate some device is still trying to use the phone line. Are you sure there's nothing you've overlooked - an autodialer in a burglar alarm, an unused computer modem, a caller-ID box?
As others have said, assuming your internet connection is DSL, the fact that it's working is a pretty good (although not 100%) sign that your phone line is in good shape.
Eric Law

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Surprising as it seems, this is just not true. It is quite possible to have DSL and no dial tone. This often is the case when the line gets shorted out by something like water in the box (has it rained hard lately?), or animals gnawing on the insulation, or just plain corrosion. In some ways the DSL signal is more tolerant than POTS. BTW, if your DSL is still connected, then you don't have everything unplugged. Try unplugging the DSL and plug in one phone to check for a dial tone.
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BobJ



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Um... gee... that's why I put the "not 100%" part in!
Although in my experience with maybe 30 different installations, I've seen "dialtone with no DSL" numerous times, have never seen "DSL with no dialtone".
Good idea about unplugging the DSL though, and as other posters have said, the filters too.
Eric
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In article

Well, that clinches it: You're making it up. Quit it and leave the poor company alone. <big grin>

It can be helpful if, using a working phone (cell phone, neighbor's phone, etc), you dial your number and see what you get. Ring/no answer would suggest an OPEN somewhere. A busy signal would indicate a line fault/short somewhere.
Take a working phone to the Network Interface and plug it in. Since you don't have one, and you even made that abundantly clear, I thought I would join the others and make the same, inane suggestion anyway. <sigh>
Since you don't have a SNID (Standard Network Interface Device), you can probably await a repair without worry for a charge, even if the trouble is INSIDE your home.

Yeah, it did me, too, the first time I encountered such a repair. DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) will work over a SINGLE conductor, even a rather faulted one. It takes a "clean" pair for dialtone to work.

I don't either, but I've managed to fool my employer. Please don't tell on me. <g>

That's as good a term as any other. Without seeing the situation, I suppose you have a "grandfathered" demarc. That is simply a station "protector" device where the service "drop" and station wire are "commoned" on binding posts. This is not a bad thing.

OK, you are an order of magnitude beyond the average telephone subscriber simply by virtue of using the word "multimeter", much less possessing and using one.
24 volts across the pair suggests an OPEN pair.
Ideally, one side of the pair should have -0- volts with SOLID continuity to ground while the other side, with one test lead connected to ground, should have -48 to -52 VDC.

Wait for your phone to ring. I'll bet "they" don't even have to come to the house. Please let us know what happened. Good luck.
--
:)
JR

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wrote:

The voltage should be 48 volts but only if nothing is connected to it. Disconnect your DSL and check your voltage.With it connected it should be 24 volts. A DSL will work with they call a dry line. In other words you do not have to have phone service to use he internet . If your internet works and you have 48 volts with DSL and everything disconnected then the fault definitely rests with the phone company.
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Andy Petro wrote:

I don't think so. DSL is just an add on, the line looks the same. Mine, 2 minutes ago, read 46 volts across the tip and ring. The lower voltage, 46 volts instead of the higher 48 to 52 volts, I think, comes from the fact that my line comes from a remote vault about 3 blocks away. The DSL also comes from that vault. They use a Lucent product called Lightwave 2000 to remote the line from the central office to the vault.
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