Telemarketers

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On 2/26/2016 11:28 AM, Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

So he identified himself as a crook, not a reputable businessperson. The DNC works with reputable businesses. The fact that they are breaking the law will tell you all you need to know about them.
God, this never-ending bitchfest about crooks ignoring the DNC is exactly like people whining that they posted No Trespassing signs on their property and some people trespassed anyway.
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On 2/26/2016 11:38 AM, KenK wrote:

I don't even try as calling numbers are also forged and they just rotate through them.
Pisses me off that the phone company has to know who is doing it and our all pervasive government that only wants to protect us from terrorists don't help.
I tell people that I'm not worried about ISIS as much as my peace being disturbed by these bastards.
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Per KenK:

My impression is that these are little people working for little wages under terrible conditions.
The phone companies make money on this activity, so don't expect anything from them.
Last 3 times I counted, our ratio of telemarketer calls to legitimate calls was 5:1.
Do Not Call Lists are history - for reasons others may care to elaborate on.
So far, I see only two solutions that have promise:
- Crowd Sourcing: A third party intercepts all of your phone calls and makes a determination on whether they are legitimate. e.g. NoMoRobo Main downside appears to be cost: you have to upgrade your phone service to have CallerID and something called 'Simultaneous Ring'.
- Challenge-Response: You set up your phone service in such a way that a caller gets a message like "Press 1 for Sam, Press 2 for Sue, Press 3 for Jack...." and so-forth. People you know learn to press "9" or something to ring through.
The brass ring would be a gold list where the CallerIDs you specify ring right through.
AFIK, this approach requires you to change your phone service over to the right VOIP provider. I am about *that* close to doing this, but I have not yet gotten comfortable with the 911 issue.... 911 is *supposed* to work w/VOIP, but there are things between me and the correct 911 center that are not present with POTS and those entities are not perfect.
The third solution - which seems like it would work, but I would think has zero chance of being implemented - would be "Caller Pays" - like Euro cell phones. I call you, I get dinged for the cost of the call.... The nice-to-have would be the ability for me, the recipient, to press "*9* or something at the end of the call and have it billed to my own account instead of the caller's.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 2/26/2016 12:36 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I get robo calls every day, so we've turned off all the ringers we can turn off, there's the main base unit that can't be turned off, and let the answering machine pick up. Occasionally, we'll check the caller ID in case it may be someone we're expecting a call from on that line. If it's important, they'll leave a msg and we'll call them back. I've started to even get robo calls in my cell phone, and haven't given that number out to anyone but family or the Drs office. So, if I don't recognize the number and they don't leave a msg, I block the number. It's weird how I can block numbers on my cell phone, but can't do it on a land line.
--
Maggie

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Per Muggles:

Your cell phone is a computer - and that is what is doing the blocking.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 2/26/2016 1:15 PM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

ahh ... ok .. that makes sense. Didn't think of it that way.
--
Maggie

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On 2/26/2016 1:55 PM, Muggles wrote:

use it. We screen by caller id.
I also have a business phone which while connected by FIOS is treated by Verizon like a land line and would cost $5 or so a month to block calls. Equal amount for caller id.
Verizon is a thief just like the telemarketers.
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How do you do that? I've not gotten those calls on my cell but who knows what will happen in the future? They seem to be getting everywhere. I never looked on the cell but I've gone though the menus often for other stuff and I can't recall seeing anything about blocking calls. Or maybe it depends on the phone? Or cell service?
TIA
--
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when something closes the door from the inside.
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KenK wrote:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=us.wahooka.advanced.call.blocker&hl=en
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On 2/27/2016 11:51 AM, KenK wrote:

I go to my call history, find the number in the list that I want to block, hold down on that number 'til a pop up menu comes up with a list of options. On that pop up menu near the bottom of the list is the option "block contact". I click that and that number is blocked to my cell phone.
You may have a similar list on your phone call history.
--
Maggie

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I can't get to a menu when I go to a number on my list. Will have to play with it some more. Unfortunately, I suspect my carrier (Tracfone) or cell (LG) do not support this. If I start getting these calls I'll probably have to do some Googling or emailing concerning blocking.
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when something closes the door from the inside.
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On 3/1/2016 10:51 AM, KenK wrote:

Ok. Well, I guess you can only do what your phone allows.
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Maggie

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KenK wrote:

=========snipped======================> I can't get to a menu when I go to a number on my list. Will have to play

I have TracFone and LG34 and use Advanced Call Blocker for that phone. It is $1.99 but some times on sale for $.99
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=us.wahooka.advanced.call.blocker&hl=en
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Just to clarify for those who don't know. Nomorobo itself is free except for businesses. In my case, (FIOS digitial phone), there were no extra charges, Simultaneous ring is part of the package.
I find it hard to accept that the phone companies have to allow phone calls with blocked or faked caller id. (Hey nomorobo just blocked a call as I typed this.) I don't see why Verizon or any other carrier allows faked originating numbers on their network.
--
Dan Espen

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Per Dan Espen:

I don't claim to know much, but would have to ask how the phone company would know whether a CallerID were real or faked.
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Pete Cresswell

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Because they know the originating number. That's in the "meta data" that the government wanted to collect and their billing information. For some reason they allow calls on their network with faked caller ID information.
Here's a nice overview:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caller_ID_spoofing
Looks like spoofing the ID is now illegal in the US. What I want is for the carriers in the US to do the blocking and cut off any other carrier that allows spoofing.
--
Dan Espen

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Hi Dan,
On 2/26/2016 12:24 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

You can purchase a service that drops calls with "blocked" CID. Typically, the call is intercepted with a message: "You must unblock your CID to complete the call. Press XYZ to do so for this call."

Because there are no longer "just a handful" of telephone companies! And, much of it is VoIP (how do you KNOW where that caller is located?). Likewise, calls originating overseas (do you really think all of those customer service reps with those THICK accents are seated at desks in the USA?).
Note there are legitimate cases where a CID *needs* (wants?) to be spoofed. You'd surely not want to have to track which of the THOUSANDS of telephone numbers you could be contacted FROM by a legitimate business concern.
Do you KNOW the phone number that your MD will be using to notify you of your upcoming appointment? Or, the phone number of the radiologist at the local hospital who's calling to give your your results?
So, you rely on "intend to defraud" as the only way to differentiate between legitimate spoofing and nefarious actors. Who do you rely on to PROVE this "intent"? What's the process? What do you do when the perpetrator moves to the next office over in the office complex??
Call authentication has to be something that the callers and callees control -- without the intervention of the phone companies or legislators. To that end, all they can do is give me hooks that make it easy for me to do that. E.g., bill the calling party for the call and let ME decide if I want to "reimburse them" because I WELCOMED the call. Then, just bill (prepay) for access to The Network.
Alternatively, authenticate the actual contact -- like PEM -- so a smartphone can decide to take or drop the call before incurring air time costs.
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Per Don Y:

I am one of those.
My outgoing VOIP calls get the caller ID spoofed to contain my land line number.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On Fri, 26 Feb 2016 13:29:50 -0700, Don Y

Yes, of course. The fact is they take native Americans and teach them to talk with foreign accents, just so customers won't expect much when they call Customer Service. It takes only 4 days to teach them an accent, but they save an average of 6.4 hours every week not assisting customers when they seem to not understand the questions.
After 5 weeks, it's pure profit.
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wrote:

Look into Jolly Roger Phone Company. If you google, it's not the home page. It's farther down and refers to this problem. I'd know the page but FF probably lost the tab for me.
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