Tecumseh carbs


I've got a 12 year old snow thrower with a Tecumseh Snow King HMSK-100 engine. Carb on this is the float style.
In addition to the regular maintenance this year I suspect I may need to pull the carb off for a good cleaning. Presently it stutters at the higher rpm's and I see where a dirty carb is one of the check items. Carb has never been off previously.
Question for those familiar with these are there any pitfalls to watch out for? Such as gaskets that always rip?,, etc
Thanks
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Jim wrote:

New gasket is readily available or just make one if needed.
Nothing of any consequence in these.
I'd check to see if the problem isn't the throttle shaft has worn the body holes where it goes thru, however as that's a typical problem which yields air inleakage so can't adjust mixture consistently.
If is problem, there really is no cure other than replacement.
--
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I have several machines with Tecumseh engines of various sizes and ages. The Carter carbs they use are a simple float design and not very tricky for the mo.pst part.
Couple of important tips:
with the carb stripped of all external parts including the float, hold it so that your fingers prevent the choke and throttle from moving, and shake the carb near your ear. There is an emulsion tube sealed inside the carb that is NOT replaceable. If you don't hear a rattle from it, throw the carb in the trash, as no amount of effort will ever repair it.
During reassembly, it is CRITICAL that the open end of the little wire that holds the float needle is pointing towards the air filter/ intake end of the carb. Otherwise the needle will not center correctly and you will never figure out why the machine won't run smoothly.
Buy a rebuild kit!
To remove the nitron rubber float needle seat, screw the tiop of a wood screw into the hole in the center and yank it out. It sometinme doesn't come out very easily. The new one goes in with the grooved side down, and can be forced down to it's home with a bolt that is just big enough to fit into the bore.
You can buy a GUNK carb soaker at an autoparts store. Well worth the $30, and you can use it for many years of carb cleanings. Remove all rubber parts as well as all screws, etc, and soak the carb overnight in it. The kit comes in a metal gallon paint can, and includes a strainer basket for the parts. WEAR GLOVES AND EYE PROTECTION! NOT KIDDING! VERY STRONG STUFF!!!
Replace the gasket between the carb and the engine regardless of how good it looks. They never reseal after being disturbed. While you are at the autoparts store, you can buy a sheet of Victor "Victolex JV100" gasket material for a few bucks that will last you and your neigbors a lifetime. Cut your own gaskets. It's really not hard to do. Having a sheet of the stuff means you will never be tempted to reuse a gasket. That will save you a lot of grief.
Here's a good source for rebuild kits and other smal engine parts: http://www.mfgsupply.com/m/c/index.html?id=xVSkpKvM
If you really get stuck, or your emulsion tube is gummed up, they have complete carbs, too.
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On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 09:14:04 -0400, salty wrote:

Thanks for the hints.
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Jim wrote:

That's why you get a carb kit that has all the gaskets.
--
Blattus Slafaly ف ٣ :) ⅞

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On Sun, 28 Sep 2008 09:34:26 -0400, Blattus Slafaly

Carb kits don't include the mounting gasket.
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