"Tar paper" on roof of small overhang

Small -- 4x6 +- wooden "eyebrow" or overhang on back porch (S. exposure).
Have to replace old worn cover (what we used to call "tar paper".
Any difference between individual shingles and sheet, in terms of wear?
I assume ease of replacement better with indiv. shingles, but cost of installation higher?
Your wisdom appreciated.
HB
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On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 1:17:12 PM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

Probably what they call "rolled roofing" around here. It is a cheap roofing material, basically a giant rolled-up shingle, a heavy asphalt backer with fine aggregate embedded. Not as durable as shingles, but certainly more durable than 30lb felt.

If you're talking rolled roofing, individual shingles are much more durable.

Probably.
I would want this eyebrow or whatever the hell it is to have a roof that matches the rest of the house.
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On 7/2/13 1:17 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

What is the pitch (or slope) of this overhang ?? Shingles are not recommended on flat or nearly flat roofs. (IIRC minimum of 1:4 pitch). Rainwater can wick up under flat-lying shingles and cause water damage. Use "roll roofing" instead, not "tar paper or felt", in a color to go with rest of roof.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/GAF-Mineral-Guard-Roll-Roofing-Charcoal-1002180/202052411#.UdMykevrkfo
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On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 1:17:12 PM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

Shingles and sheet of what? Hard to believe that the roof just has tar paper on it now. What's on the rest of the house? You would think the porch would have the same roofing, unless the porch roof is too low pitch and has rolled roofing, ie hot tar type which is usually used on flat roofs. What is the pitch?

I doubt there is much difference in the cost of doing a porch roof either way. But if it has enough pitch for shingles to be used, then rolled roofing is going to look like hell.

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On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 12:17:12 PM UTC-5, Higgs Boson wrote:

erence between individual shingles and sheet, in terms of wear? I assume ea se of replacement better with indiv. shingles, but cost of installation hig her? Your wisdom appreciated. HB
Roll roofing over an adhesive vapor barrier like used along drip edges.
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Any chance that you could upload a photo (through http://tinypic.comor another similar site)?
I think that would make it a lot easier for people to see what you need and what would work best.
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On Wednesday, July 3, 2013 7:23:15 AM UTC-7, TomR wrote:

OK, here is pic to show angle of "eyebrow" roof on back porch.
http://tinypic.com/r/35ko77d/5
Hope this will help recommend shingles vs ??
Also: must shingles be underlaid with ? specific name of product?
Much TIA
HB
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Thanks for the photo. I was surprised because when I read "eyebrow" in your original post I was thinking of the curved type of eyebrow roof structure. If you go to Google Images at http://www.images.google.com and do a search for ---> eyebrow roof <--- you'll see what I mean.
So, what you have is an overhang over a porch with a flat pitched roof. And the pitch is enough that you have a choice of using individual shingles or roll roofing or other options.
It would probably help if you posted a photo of the existing roof so people could see what is there now, how it connects to the house, etc. And, if the photo (or another photo) could show another part of the roof for the rest of the house, people could get an idea of whether to try to match that style etc. With a better photo or two of the actual roof, people here could also let you know if you need drip edge etc. I know a little about that, but not as much as others here.
Are you thinking of doing this yourself or having someone else do it? That could make a difference also in terms or which roofing materials you may want to use.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Yes, you're right. I'm not exactly sure how they do that.
It looks like he may have a stucco finish on the back wall. If so, and if good flashing is already there going under the stucco, then maybe the new roof can go under the existing flashing (by lifting it a little?) and then use roof cement -- I don't know; I'm just guessing.
Or, maybe channel out some of the existing stucco along the roof line (with an angle grinder), try to run the new flashing under that and over the new roof, and then roof cement? -- again, just guessing.
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On Friday, July 12, 2013 3:38:19 PM UTC-4, TomR wrote:

That's the general idea. I haven't done flashing with stucco or roll roofing, so can't help there. But it's a prime candidate for a screw up if you have a "handyman" doing a roofing job. On the other hand, might be hard to find a roofer that wants to do a small job like that.
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On Friday, July 12, 2013 12:42:37 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Guys, you're in my Will (all $4.50 worth <g>) for catching angles that wouldn't have occurred to me! Let's hear it for AHR!
So I'll get rolled roofing (no more outmoded terms like "tar paper") and find a roofer that can squeeze me in.
Huge thanks.
HB
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On Sat, 13 Jul 2013 20:36:37 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Unless the deck is thicker than 3/4", the nails are supposed to protrude. Looks like crap on a soffit though.
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3/8" to start with. Add another 3/8 or 1/2" and 1 inch nails either just peek through or do not protrude..
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Of course, we don't know what adding a second layer will do the junction of the overhang and the house. At a minimum, it will probably need to be flashed, at worse it will not work with the the house siding. Hard to say without a picture of the top surface and the wall.
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On Tuesday, July 2, 2013 10:17:12 AM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

OK, here is pic showing angle of "eyebrow" overhang on back porch.
http://tinypic.com/r/35ko77d/5
This was about whether to use shingles or sheet. Recommendation so far was for shingles. Need to put something underneath? Name of product?
Big TIA
HB
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On Thursday, July 11, 2013 4:43:04 AM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

Pitch is OK for shingles. What the pic doesn't show is what's on the rest of the roof? Why doesn't that section have the same shingles or roof as the rest of the house? That would be normal.
As far as shingles, the application is as follows:
15# or 30# felt
if you're in an area subject to snow, freezing weather, code usually requires water barrier material from the eaves up to 2ft past the heated wall for that section instead of felt
drip edge along eaves and rakes
flashing where the roof meets the house
shingles
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On Thursday, July 11, 2013 4:11:03 AM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Here's pic showing how overhang attaches to back of house. No prob. with (what little) rain we get; it just runs off. Note that rain vent from (flat) roof does not discharge onto overhang.
http://tinypic.com/r/xde9mp/5
Thanks for cold weather info, but not applicable here; this is So.Calif coastal.
Also, there's not a question of aesthetics -- matching the overhang to roof. Roof is flat tar paper (except in front; peak w/Spanish tiles).
Is this enough info to decide whether felt and shingles or felt and roll? ISTR that shingles was preferred, though more expensive (?)
I'm not doing the work myself. Looking for skilled handyman. If not found, will have to bite the bullet and hope to catch a roofer between big jobs.
Thanks to all for input.
HB
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On Friday, July 12, 2013 12:01:13 AM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

From the pic, I still can't see how it matches the rest of the roofing, building, etc. And what you keep calling "tar paper" is most likely rolled roofing, which is what is used on many flat or very low pitch roofs.
So, up to you what to use. Normally, I wouldn't use a handyman for any roofing project. One mistake and you have leaks. But if you do, the critical area is where the roof meets the building, which needs to be flashed correctly. And if you go with a handyman, shingles are going to be the likely choice, I don't think many handymen are going to do rolled roofing.
Either will work. It's up to you to decide if shingles will look better and then there are the color choices, 3 tab or architectural, etc. You can see what they look like at HD, Lowes, building supply houses, neighbors houses, etc.
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On Thu, 11 Jul 2013 01:43:04 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

felt is what is usually called "tar paper" Heavy "tar paper" with a stone finish is called "roll roofing" which would be your other option. With the pitch and size you have there, a bundle of shingles should just about do the job Roll roofing doesn't make as good a job without a lot of extra work/care.
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